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NEWS
May 13, 1992
* Annie F. Burgess, 93, of Ellicott City, retired clerk:I don't think they should have any more building. They got enough as far as I'm concerned. I've been a resident of Howard County all my life. I think there's too much building in all of the county. I'm tired of all these buildings.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
The would-be developers of a residential neighborhood in Frederick are suing the federal government over alleged groundwater contamination from neighboring Fort Detrick. Waverley View Investors LLC, which owns 92 acres near the long-standing center for biological research, says "the U.S. Army's negligence in its chemical handling and disposal practices" dating back decades has led to levels of trichloroethylene of up to 42 times the federal maximum contaminant level. The corporation, based in McLean, Va., says the contamination has prevented it from realizing plans to develop the land for 732 homes.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
An environmental contractor just outside Sykesville has asked the Carroll Circuit Court to review the mayor's and Town Council's decision last month to rezone a neighboring property for residential development.While it's more usual to see neighborhoods trying to keep out industry, this judicial review is sought by Enviro Serve Inc. of the 7400 block of Buttercup Road, a training school for construction workers that serves the East Coast in remediation work such as asbestos and lead-paint removal.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
A Baltimore-based developer is seeking to build an outlet mall with more than 100 stores in White Marsh - just across Interstate 95 from White Marsh Mall and The Avenue at White Marsh. Paragon Outlet Partners wants Baltimore County officials to allow changes to a previous plan for the 88-acre site that sought more than 1,200 housing units plus office space in a mixed-use development called Nottingham Ridge. The company proposed a single-story, 440,000-square-foot outlet complex as the first phase of a larger development that could include about 250 residential units and non-outlet shops, according to R. Kelvin Antill, Paragon's development partner.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
The County Commissioners put the final touches yesterday on a growth-control measure that would limit residential development to 1,000 units a year.The bill, which is intended to direct growth to areas where schools, roads and public services are adequate, was altered slightly during a three-hour work session attended by developers, attorneys, municipal officials and representatives of the Carroll Economic Development Commission.The commissioners plan to enact the revised measure at 8: 30 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
July 29, 1999
PLANNERS know that stimulating residential development is a way to revitalize declining urban centers. Witness Baltimore's recent proposal to turn the fanciful Bromo-Seltzer Tower near Camden Yards into apartments. Indeed, at many locations, city developers are responding enthusiastically to the call for residential conversions.But officials haven't had much success coaxing a similar housing revival in Towson.Towson, a so-called "edge city" by virtue of its concentrated office space and major retail, is not in decline, but county officials have long-range concerns.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
Faced with a burgeoning enrollment at Mount Airy Elementary School, the county commissioners decided yesterday to limit residential development in the unincorporated areas around the town to 50 lots a year. The building limit, which can be reviewed at any time, takes effect immediately and will remain in place through 2007, the commissioners said. Mount Airy Elementary, built in 1935 and expanded in 1987, has a capacity of 675 pupils. Its enrollment is 738 pupils. Next year, enrollment is projected at 833 and, by 2007, the number could reach 1,000.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
A Baltimore-based developer is seeking to build an outlet mall with more than 100 stores in White Marsh - just across Interstate 95 from White Marsh Mall and The Avenue at White Marsh. Paragon Outlet Partners wants Baltimore County officials to allow changes to a previous plan for the 88-acre site that sought more than 1,200 housing units plus office space in a mixed-use development called Nottingham Ridge. The company proposed a single-story, 440,000-square-foot outlet complex as the first phase of a larger development that could include about 250 residential units and non-outlet shops, according to R. Kelvin Antill, Paragon's development partner.
NEWS
July 30, 2001
Shaner is vice chair of U.S. tennis panel Carol Shaner, president of Franklin/Thomas Association Management Inc. of Ellicott City, has been appointed vice chairman of the U.S. Tennis Association's Technical Committee. Richard Della joins Rainmaker Group Richard Della has joined the Rainmaker Group, a golf course and residential development company, as a vice president of development. He will work with Rainmaker Associates Ltd., the residential development arm of the company that developed Timbers at Troy Golf Course in Elkridge.
NEWS
November 28, 1999
BALTIMORE County Councilman Vincent J. Gardina's proposed 18-moratorium on residential development may be just the device needed for the county to realize its economic development goals on the east side.Moratoriums generally act like floodgates. While in place, they stop development. Once they end, a torrent of development follows.Business development has always been the rationale for extending Route 43 beyond White Marsh to Middle River. Now that the road's construction is receiving its final approvals, county officials worry the new thoroughfare may generate a flurry of unintended residential growth.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
K. Hovnanian Homes is planning to develop a community of townhomes in Dundalk on the land that used to be the North Point Drive-In theater, which closed three decades ago, and more recently served as an outdoor flea market. The 108-unit development will be called The Townes at North point, according to St. John Properties Inc., which in partnership with N.P. Investment LLC, sold K. Hovnanian the 11-acre parcel of land at 4001 North Point Boulevard for $2 million. K. Hovnanian, one of the nation's largest home builders, plans to break ground on The Townes later this year.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Eastern Baltimore County residents say a bill before the County Council could open the door to poorly planned development on a key tract in the Middle River area near Route 43. "Let's work on a better bill, please," said Allen Robertson, president of the Bowleys Quarters Community Association, during a council work session Tuesday. Robertson said his group wants the council to withdraw or table the legislation. The measure, proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's administration, would allow residential development on part of an 800-acre tract near White Marsh Boulevard that is now zoned for industrial use. County leaders once hoped the site would attract major employers.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2012
A battle over the future of the closed Chestnut Ridge golf course in Lutherville is continuing, with the company that bought the property now suing the Baltimore County Council over its decision to limit the land's development potential. In a lawsuit filed last month in Baltimore County Circuit, CR Golf Club LLC, which has ties to Timonium developer Cignal Corp., claims council members made an unfair land-use decision this summer that limited the number of homes that can be built on the approximately 230-acre property off Falls Road.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 26, 2012
There's a transformation taking place this fall that is obvious from the former National Brewery in Brewers Hill. On a terrace just below the iconic Mr. Boh sign, I observed a construction army at work along Conkling and Dean streets. Over the summer, they labored on the creation of more than 600 new apartment rental units in low-rise buildings. Week by week, floors rose. Balconies appeared. Parking decks arrived. And sweeps disappeared down an ancient brick powerhouse chimney. For years, this eastern end of Canton was a hard-toiling industrial neighborhood, served by ships and rail sidings, surrounded by rowhouses and dotted with church steeples.
EXPLORE
September 12, 2012
Developer Jackson-Shaw has started the next stage of residential development at Brickyard Station, a 63-acre transit-oriented community in Beltsville and Laurel. JLB Partners purchased land to construct 433 multifamily units, with completion expected in fall 2013, and Ryland Homes is starting construction on model homes prior to developing more than 400 single-family homes and townhomes in the community. Both projects represent a combined investment of $200 million for Brickyard Station, Jackson-Shaw officials said.
EXPLORE
By John Culleton | September 8, 2012
It's a common refrain, and sometimes uttered for various reasons: We need to continue to control residential growth in Carroll County. My reason? New residences attract growing families - and growing families burden our school system. It is stated in the press, and even in the school system, that our school population is shrinking. That may be, countywide, but in my view the situation would have more gravity if I did not see portable classrooms still parked at most of the schools in the southern part of Carroll County.
NEWS
February 29, 2004
Runaway growth a burden to residents It is disappointing, but not surprising, to learn of the new proposed "fire tax" to cover the cost of fire and emergency medical services for Carroll County. This is one more example of the cost of residential development being born by the existing homeowners, instead of the developers causing runaway growth. As reported in The Sun, a public hearing was held Sept. 22 in Union Bridge regarding the proposed annexation of a 126-acre parcel for a residential development, with another planned development that could triple the inhabitants of our 1,100 population town.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
Workshops, hearings to be scheduled on zoning law changes Revisions to Carroll County's zoning law and ordinance on subdivision standards will be considered at public workshops and hearings expected to be held in the next few months. The county commissioners voted yesterday to forward the proposed changes for public discussion. This is the latest action in the county's efforts to revise growth laws during a yearlong freeze on residential development. Last month, county planning director Steven C. Horn presented changes to the adequate public facilities law, and the commissioners voted to schedule a public hearing.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2012
The Harford County Council is poised to attempt action to ease development restrictions imposed by the Maryland General Assembly in the 2012 session. In short, the restrictions apply to areas outside Harford County's official development area. That area, known as the Development Envelope, is served by public water lines and sanitary sewer service, making it most suitable for large scale residential and commercial development. The affected area, even on county planning documents, is largely rural.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
The Howard County school board is scheduled to reconsider Tuesday a measure that would determine which schools can accommodate new residential development. Each year, school officials craft a chart that designates the areas ripe for development under the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance by labeling schools as open or closed. The ordinance ensures that roads, school buildings and other infrastructure can handle more residents. Recently, the school board failed to pass the chart, voting in favor of it 4-3. The chart requires at least five votes for passage and allows for the student board member, who has limited voting powers, to cast a vote.
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