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BUSINESS
June 29, 1996
Columbia Gas of Maryland yesterday filed a proposal with the state's Public Service Commission that would offer about 36 percent of the utility's residential customers a choice in buying natural gas.The plan, which will be offered to 10,000 customers under a two-year pilot program beginning Nov. 1, is similar to one that Columbia Gas' sister company filed earlier this month in Pennsylvania. The program is expected to reduce customers' natural gas costs, said Gary J. Robinson, president and chief executive of Columbia Gas."
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is asking for its fourth rate increase in as many years, one that would raise distribution charges to residents getting both gas and electric service by nearly $15 a month on average. The utility filed the $185 million request Wednesday with Maryland regulators, who have reduced past requests significantly. BGE said it's in the middle of a multiyear effort to upgrade infrastructure in order to improve service, and it needs to cover its costs. The company wants permission to raise distribution rates - the charge for moving energy to customers - by $6.57 a month on the average residential electric bill and $8.53 a month on the average residential gas bill.
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BUSINESS
By Gady Epstein and Timothy B. Wheeler and Gady Epstein and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening upped the ante in the electricity deregulation debate yesterday by calling for a 7.5 percent cut in residential rates, to last for five years, in legislation being written by the General Assembly.The governor's proposed rate cut pleased consumer advocates and environmentalists, but drew skepticism from leading legislators, and opposition from utilities and businesses who contend that such a cut would be too deep and last too long.With just four weeks left in the 1999 legislative session, Glendening is making a late entry into the electricity competition debate -- showing that he may be interested in passing deregulation, if it's on his terms.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. asked Friday for a monthly surcharge on gas customers to cover part of the cost of replacing old pipes, a request that comes in addition to the rate increase and electric surcharge it is seeking. BGE said it asked state regulators for permission to charge residential gas customers 32 cents a month and business customers $1.87 a month, starting in February. The utility intends to ask for higher monthly surcharges in each of the following four years — effectively topping out at $2 for residents and $11.55 for businesses, though some of that amount ultimately could be pushed into base rates.
NEWS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
Talk about an electric jolt. The average bill for a Baltimore Gas and Electric customer will rise by 72 percent - or $743 a year - after July 1, the state utility commission said yesterday as it released the results of a reverse auction among suppliers to provide electricity to Maryland utilities. The increase for BGE's 1.2 million residential customers will be one of the biggest one-year price hikes in the nation. And yesterday's news was the most tangible evidence yet that the power market is quite different from the scenario that state lawmakers and regulators predicted seven years ago when they approved a deregulation plan intended to spur competition and lower prices.
NEWS
February 10, 2003
ToadNet Inc. a privately owned Internet service provider located in Severna Park, has acquired Radicus Internet LLC, a Baltimore-based Internet service provider. The acquisition of Radicus Internet, which provides access and related services to business and residential customers in the mid-Atlantic region, further expands ToadNet's reach into the mid-Atlantic market. Radicus Internet's more than 1,300 business and residential customers gain access to ToadNet's full range of Internet services provided through its regional network.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2002
The Maryland Public Service Commission reaffirmed its commitment yesterday to electric deregulation and customer choice - allowing residential customers to choose an alternative power supplier. The PSC statement was a response to a Jan. 16 report from the Office of the People's Counsel that said 18 months of deregulation had produced little in the way of competition or new services. Until there are options and clear consumer benefits, the OPC report recommended, the Maryland General Assembly should consider suspending electricity choice for the state's 1.8 million residential customers who could face higher prices when rate caps begin expiring in about two years.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
In the first major examination of Maryland's effort to restructure the electricity market, a report released yesterday by the People's Counsel said that deregulation has failed to produce competition and new services for residential customers since it began 18 months ago. The report recommended that until there are clear consumer benefits, the Maryland General Assembly should consider suspending electricity choice for the state's 1.8 million residential customers...
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | September 27, 1994
The average Potomac Edison customer will see a $3.71 rate increase on the November utility bill, rather than the $8.63 requested in April, company officials said yesterday.Potomac Edison, which serves about 9,400 customers in Carroll County, has said a residential customer who uses 1,000 kilowatts of energy a month will now pay $74.46 each month rather than $70.75.Company officials won the increase -- the fifth requested this year -- by arguing that it was necessary to help pay for a scrubber system on its coal-burning power stations in West Virginia.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1994
FREDERICK -- Potomac Edison rate increases are exceeding the rate of inflation, causing frustration among customers on fixed incomes, state Public Service Commission representatives were told last night."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers will be paying higher rates this year, with the average bills rising by several dollars a month, to cover the cost of upgrading the utility's infrastructure. Maryland's Public Service Commission, which regulates the company, said Friday it approved an increase to distribution rates that will cost the average residential electricity customer an additional $3.33 a month and the average residential gas customer an extra $2.70 a month. The utility had sought larger rate increases.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
As many as 300 Verizon customers in West Baltimore lost service Thursday after cables were cut, the company said. The outage to telephone and DSL service affected state government offices, small businesses and residents, Verizon spokeswoman Sandra Arnette said. Service was expected to be restored by midday Friday, she said. Arnette said the damage to equipment in an alley off West North Avenue near Pennsylvania Avenue was the first act of vandalism reported in Baltimore since Sunday, Aug. 7, when members of the Communications Workers of America and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers began a strike after their contract expired, she said.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. customers are expected to save as much as $161 annually when rates begin to plunge this summer to their lowest level since a massive rate hike in 2006. Maryland ratepayers will enjoy lower electric bills starting in June — extending a downward trend that began last October and is expected to continue through 2012, according to BGE. The lower rates stem from cheaper prices obtained at a recent electricity supply auction — and reflect a global drop in commodity and energy prices.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2009
Lower electricity rates next winter Residential customers of Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. can expect electricity rates to be lower next winter compared with the past one that resulted in increased complaints about higher-than-expected utility bills, state energy regulators said Thursday. The new projections are based on bids for electricity for two-year power contracts that begin Oct. 1. The recent bids from an auction completed Monday reflect lower wholesale energy prices. The actual rates will be released by June 1. However, BGE residential customers will pay $16 more on average for their annual bills from June to May 2010.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | May 29, 2008
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers will get a one-time break from rising electricity bills in September, when the utility begins distributing $170 credits as part of a plan approved by state utility regulators yesterday. The bill credits were contained in a $2 billion settlement that state lawmakers approved last month to resolve a dispute with BGE's corporate parent, Constellation Energy Group Inc. Lawmakers passed the deal in the final hours of the legislative session, ending a long-simmering feud over terms of the 1999 deal to move the state to a deregulated power market.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | August 28, 2007
Sheirmiar White launched Ohms Energy Co. in spring 2006 with a promise to beat Baltimore Gas and Electric's rates, hoping to show that deregulation could deliver lower electricity prices. Instead, Ohms last week became the latest example of how alternative energy providers have struggled to gain a toehold in Maryland despite BGE's 70 percent rate increase over the past year. The state Public Service Commission indefinitely suspended Ohms' license to sell power Friday after it fell behind on payments to suppliers and disclosed that it could no longer serve its 2,100 customers.
NEWS
April 19, 2004
ELECTRICITY CUSTOMERS across the state are in for a shock. Beginning this summer, a 5-year-old freeze on prices begins to thaw for residential users in the Washington suburbs and on the Eastern Shore. Rates are estimated to rise as much as 35 percent. Some state lawmakers had hoped to cushion the blow by allowing county and municipal governments to negotiate prices on behalf of residential customers so they could take advantage of their collective buying power in the newly deregulated electricity market.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Even as they offered support for legislation that would create a task force to monitor electricity deregulation, regulators, utilities and energy suppliers urged state lawmakers yesterday to be patient as competition develops in Maryland. The state "must stay the course" and allow the 1999 deregulation law to "stand the test of time," said industry representatives at a joint hearing held by two powerful legislators who recently introduced a bill to create a joint oversight committee on electric customer choice and competition.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | January 14, 2007
Seeking to avoid the turmoil BGE underwent over plans to sharply raise electricity rates last year, the utility serving thousands of homes in parts of Howard and Carroll counties and Western Maryland has asked regulators for permission to increase rates this spring -- well before price caps expire. The idea, Allegheny Power says, is to impose two 15 percent surcharges and use the money plus interest to soften the blow for consumers when the company's price caps take effect in 2009. Those affected by the plan will get a chance starting this week to offer their opinions to the state's Public Service Commission.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | January 14, 2007
Seeking to avoid the turmoil BGE underwent over plans to sharply raise electricity rates last year, the utility serving thousands of homes in parts of Howard and Carroll counties and Western Maryland has asked regulators for permission to increase rates this spring --well before price caps expire. The idea, Allegheny Power says, is to impose two 15 percent surcharges and use the money plus interest to soften the blow for consumers when the company's price caps expire in 2009. Those affected will get a chance, starting this week, to offer their opinions on the plan to the state's Public Service Commission.
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