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BUSINESS
June 27, 1993
Residential construction leaps in Las VegasOUESTION: In what region is homebuilding most active?ANSWER: Florida, the mountain states and the "oil patch" region have experienced the most homebuilding activity in recent months, according to a report from U.S. Housing Markets. Overall, the number of building permits for residential construction has been steadily increasing in most regions of the country since the fall of 1991.The most dramatic increase of residential construction in a single metro area is in Las Vegas.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
To win the two-bedroom Canton condo Jillian Rimmer wanted, she offered to pay $75 more a month than the asking rent of $1,600. It worked: The landlord chose her bid, and she and a roommate live there now. "I was willing to pay that for the great location and parking," said Rimmer, who is in her early 30s and who moved to Baltimore from Columbia. "I had quite a bit of trouble finding a place. Pretty much as soon as a listing went online, it was gone. " Many interested in urban living face the same problem in Baltimore's competitive rental market, in which a limited supply of quality rentals in popular neighborhoods such as Federal Hill, Fells Point and Mount Vernon have tenants scrambling to secure leases.
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BUSINESS
August 18, 2002
At an industry seminar last week in Las Vegas, construction economist Bill Toal, formerly of the Portland Cement Association, forecast a 1.6 percent drop in total construction for the year, with an expected increase of 1.4 percent in 2003. Toal based his forecast on orders for cement products, which are considered a good indicator of construction activity because of their widespread use in residential, commercial, industrial and public works construction. Toal said that while some sectors remain weak, the economy is showing signs of improvement, with housing starts in particular still robust.
BUSINESS
By Bob Erle and Bob Erle,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
The state's homebuilders are embarking on a new campaign to highlight the economic influence of residential construction on local taxpayers and to counter criticism of their supposed role in area sprawl. Members of the Home Builders Association of Maryland will outline a new study during a conference in Baltimore this week showing the tax dollars that new homes provide area jurisdictions. Builders want to emphasize the jobs that residential construction creates and the tax revenue it generates.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2000
Future-construction home contracts in Md. down 8% in September Contracts for future residential construction in Maryland for September dropped 8 percent to $226.6 million from $245.3 million when compared with the corresponding period last year, according to statistics from F. W. Dodge, a publisher of construction market reports. Residential construction includes single- and two-family houses, and apartments. However, year-to-date construction contract figures are 19 percent higher than in 1999, $2.78 billion vs. $2.34 billion.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1995
HUD to offer incentives on repossessed homesSeveral sales and marketing initiatives to promote the sale of repossessed homes were announced last week by the Maryland state office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.Beginning Saturday, HUD will advertise a "Property of the Week" which will be sold for 30 percent less than the last list price. This program will run for four weeks.Buyers who settle on HUD-designated "hard to sell" properties between Aug. 1 and Sept. 30 will be eligible for up to $300 in moving assistance.
BUSINESS
By Bob Erle and Bob Erle,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
The state's homebuilders are embarking on a new campaign to highlight the economic influence of residential construction on local taxpayers and to counter criticism of their supposed role in area sprawl. Members of the Home Builders Association of Maryland will outline a new study during a conference in Baltimore this week showing the tax dollars that new homes provide area jurisdictions. Builders want to emphasize the jobs that residential construction creates and the tax revenue it generates.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | May 5, 1992
New housing permits granted in the Baltimore area shot up 41 percent in March compared with the same month last year, signaling a revival in residential construction, the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments said in its latest report.The region, which includes Baltimore and the five nearby counties, recorded 1,090 permits for new housing units in March, the agency said."Just by the volume of permits coming in, we see that a rather significant upturn is occurring," Josef Nathanson, council research director, said yesterday.
NEWS
July 27, 1994
By voting to limit developers to recording 50 lots a year per subdivision, the Carroll County Planning Commission has come down on the side of controlling residential growth. While there is no magic in this figure, it halves the number of houses that developers currently can build in each of their subdivisions in a year.It is clear that other types of growth controls, such as building moratoriums and limits on permits, create more inequities thanthis arbitrary limit. Building moratoriums may freeze construction in large areas of the county but have no effect in other areas.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1995
Future home contracts 22% lower than April '94April contracts for future residential construction in Maryland were 22 percent lower than in 1994, according to figures released by the F. W. Dodge Division of DRI-McGraw Hill Inc. of New York. F. W. Dodge reported that contracts for one- and two-family houses and apartments totaled $198.5 million in April compared with $254.5 million during the same period last year.Despite the April decline, residential construction in Maryland is up by 19 percent for the first four months of 1995 at 960.2 million compared with $807.
BUSINESS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2003
Theft at residential construction sites has become an expensive part of doing business, according to Maryland homebuilders. Builders, police and insurance workers said items such as lumber and appliances often disappear from residential construction sites when building crews go home for the evening. With added costs to replace stolen goods and increased liability insurance rates, the often underreported crime is hurting contractors' profits and consumers, experts say. The National Association of Home Builders estimates that the losses increase the cost of a new home by 1 percent to 2 percent.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2003
Faced with growing pressure from builders and the threat of future lawsuits, Anne Arundel County officials will debate an issue today that has bedeviled jurisdictions across the region: how to balance school construction and new housing development. County Executive Janet S. Owens and Planning Officer Joseph W. Rutter Jr. want to come up with a more accurate way to calculate the number of open seats in local schools, while assuring developers that they would wait no more than six years to get the green light for a project, regardless of available seats.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2002
At an industry seminar last week in Las Vegas, construction economist Bill Toal, formerly of the Portland Cement Association, forecast a 1.6 percent drop in total construction for the year, with an expected increase of 1.4 percent in 2003. Toal based his forecast on orders for cement products, which are considered a good indicator of construction activity because of their widespread use in residential, commercial, industrial and public works construction. Toal said that while some sectors remain weak, the economy is showing signs of improvement, with housing starts in particular still robust.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
After months of wrangling, Carroll's commissioners strengthened county growth-control measures yesterday to reduce the number of homes built each year and to deter housing developments away from areas with inadequate schools and public services. The revisions to Carroll's concurrency management ordinance, enacted in 1998 to ensure growth does not outpace the county's ability to provide services, take effect immediately and are retroactive to July 1. Nearly 700 homes are set for construction in the county - outside municipal limits - next year.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
After months of wrangling, the county commissioners strengthened Carroll's growth-control measures yesterday to reduce the number of homes built each year and to deter housing developments away from areas with inadequate schools and public services. The revisions to Carroll's concurrency management ordinance, enacted in 1998 to ensure growth does not outpace the county's ability to provide schools, roads and services, take effect immediately and are retroactive to July 1. Nearly 700 homes are set for construction in the county - outside municipal limits - next year.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
Looking to solve problems generated by Carroll's burgeoning growth, about 70 town leaders and residents met with the county commissioners last night to discuss proposals to limit residential development. The commissioners unveiled proposed revisions to Carroll's growth-management ordinance, which was created in 1998. That ordinance set limits on residential construction - 1,000 homes a year for six years - to ensure that development would not outpace the county's ability to provide adequate infrastructure.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2002
After months of wrangling, Carroll's commissioners strengthened county growth-control measures yesterday to reduce the number of homes built each year and to deter housing developments away from areas with inadequate schools and public services. The revisions to Carroll's concurrency management ordinance, enacted in 1998 to ensure growth does not outpace the county's ability to provide services, take effect immediately and are retroactive to July 1. Nearly 700 homes are set for construction in the county - outside municipal limits - next year.
NEWS
August 7, 1994
The following editorial appeared in another edition of The Sun recently:Carroll County* By voting to limit developers to recording 50 lots a year per subdivision, the Carroll County Planning Commission has come down on the side of controlling residential growth. While there is no magic in this figure, it halves the number of houses that developers currently can build in each of their subdivisions in a year.It is clear that other types of growth controls, such as building moratoriums and limits on permits, create more inequities than this arbitrary limit.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2001
The Maryland Mortgage Program is offering a new Web-based system that will enable participating lenders to increase their efficiency by completing basic tasks online. The Lender Online Loan Reservation System allows lenders to obtain up-to-the-minute information about funds availability, reserve funds and check the status of a loan, and access interest rate changes, manuals and documents. The MMP - the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development's largest financing program - provides roughly $200 million a year primarily for low- and moderate-income first-time homebuyers.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2000
Future-construction home contracts in Md. down 8% in September Contracts for future residential construction in Maryland for September dropped 8 percent to $226.6 million from $245.3 million when compared with the corresponding period last year, according to statistics from F. W. Dodge, a publisher of construction market reports. Residential construction includes single- and two-family houses, and apartments. However, year-to-date construction contract figures are 19 percent higher than in 1999, $2.78 billion vs. $2.34 billion.
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