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NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
Baltimore planning officials have withdrawn a City Council proposal that would have made it easier for group homes, including those for recovering addicts, to open in residential areas. Officials of Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration, retreating from statements made this year, said the city will abandon the proposal until the state addresses neighborhood concerns. The measure, virtually identical to a proposal that died last year in the council, would have allowed certain group homes offering rehabilitative or medical assistance - including for drug and alcohol abuse - to open in residential areas.
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NEWS
January 12, 2013
Baltimore City health officials are right to view the over-concentration of liquor stores in poor and predominantly African-American neighborhoods as a threat to public well-being. They point to academic research showing statistically significant increases in violent crime in communities with an overabundance of liquor stores, as well as a host of other ill effects such as domestic violence, lower life expectancy, cardiovascular disease and sexually transmitted infections. But they didn't need to examine the literature to learn that.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
A pilot wind power program for Baltimore County was withdrawn Monday before a County Council vote after community groups complained the measure failed to protect residential areas from nearby turbines. "I didn't have the support for it," District 5 Councilman Vincent Gardina, who sponsored the measure, said after the council session Monday night. He called it "bad timing on my part" in introducing the bill during an election season. "There was a lot of opposition that came in. People weren't paying attention" to the emergence of the bill during a work session last month, he said.
NEWS
December 15, 2012
Fifty years ago, I had a wild ride with another teen driver who must have set numerous speed records for residential areas. "Don't worry," he assured me, "it's the slow drivers who cause all the accidents. " A month later, he totaled the family car. I was reminded of this by the recent letter in which a writer advocates raising speed limits to solve the speeding problem ("Raise the speed limit by 10 mph, then make it stick," Dec. 12). That doesn't work; studies by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety have shown that many drivers will exceed the speed limit no matter how high you set it. What really jumped out at me was his assertion that "drivers obeying speed limits that are set too low cause accidents when other people are forced to change lanes trying to get around them.
NEWS
November 3, 2000
THE CITY WILL intervene to help six Baltimore neighborhoods stave off what is all too often viewed as inevitable: Their continued decline once the first signs of fraying are spotted. Over the next two years, the city plans to channel $4 million in public funds to the neighborhoods, along with a like amount from foundations and lending institutions. This Healthy Neighborhoods pilot program represents a shift from previous city policies, which concentrated on trying to rescue residential areas already past the point of no return.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2006
The Baltimore City Council voted last night to give preliminary approval to a zoning law change that would make it easier to open drug treatment centers in the city, even in residential neighborhoods. The measure supported by Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration seeks to broaden the definition of health care clinics to include the centers and to remove the requirement for council ordinances to open them. The 15-member council's action last night advances the ordinance to the Oct. 30 meeting, where it is expected to be up for a final vote.
NEWS
October 26, 2007
Developments President Bush (shown above with a couple who lost their home) surveyed the damage in the hard-hit community of Rancho Bernardo. He declared seven counties a major disaster area, making residents eligible for federal assistance to help them rebuild. Four charred bodies were found in an apparent migrant camp east of San Diego that was burned by a wildfire straddling the Mexican border, authorities said yesterday. If the fire was responsible for the deaths, it would raise the toll to seven people.
NEWS
March 11, 2012
When the Mays Chapel planned unit development was approved by Baltimore County, part of the agreement was that there was to be a school built as part of the project. Since it is sorely needed now, the county should build a school that serves the area. It has been many years since this agreement, but the county hasn't fulfilled its promise. There are many children who are living in the area considered Mays Chapel. While it is true that one of the closest residential areas is a retirement community, that should not affect where a school is located.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
Baltimore County residents feeling besieged by cellular telephone towers and wireless communication industry representatives clamoring for more antennas found agreement on one thing yesterday: A proposal to regulate the placement of towers needs more work.At a public hearing held by the county's planning board, community leaders argued that proposed zoning restrictions were too lenient."The residential areas are under attack," said Louis W. Miller of Timonium. Holding up the proposed regulations, he added, "This is a monstrosity of nothing."
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 23, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- Kuwait pleaded yesterday for international help in quenching its fields of burning oil, a job complicated by poisonous gas and growing lakes of oil.Minister of Oil Rasheed al-Amiri said Kuwait needed "whatever new technologies, whatever new ideas, whatever support" any countries could give. The task "is too big. It is going to take a long time," he said.Experts exploring the fields where Iraqis exploded more than 500 oil wells have found unexpected complications, he said.About 35 wells were damaged but not set ablaze by the blasts, and about seven of these are spewing deadly hydrogen sulfide.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
A man was shot and killed Tuesday night in Baltimore's West Forest Park neighborhood, as killings in the city's Northwest District approached the total for all of last year. While the Park Heights area in the northern portion has long been a troubled area, half the killings in the district this year have occurred in the southern area, where there is lower crime and neighborhoods consist mainly of single-family homes with well-kept lawns. Maj. Johnny Delgado, the district commander, said he thinks police enforcement efforts in the northern part of the district have led criminals to venture southward.
NEWS
March 11, 2012
When the Mays Chapel planned unit development was approved by Baltimore County, part of the agreement was that there was to be a school built as part of the project. Since it is sorely needed now, the county should build a school that serves the area. It has been many years since this agreement, but the county hasn't fulfilled its promise. There are many children who are living in the area considered Mays Chapel. While it is true that one of the closest residential areas is a retirement community, that should not affect where a school is located.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Harbin Farms employees recently began stacking large pumpkins on display, in addition to their second most popular seasonal items — mums and a wide variety of apples. Kimberly Taylor, who runs the produce stand with her husband, Michael, and her uncle, had worried that a year and a half dispute over zoning might have prevented the fall display from going up. The stand has been at Route 99 and Old Mill Road in Ellicott City since 1958, when it was part of a larger family farm.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
A pilot wind power program for Baltimore County was withdrawn Monday before a County Council vote after community groups complained the measure failed to protect residential areas from nearby turbines. "I didn't have the support for it," District 5 Councilman Vincent Gardina, who sponsored the measure, said after the council session Monday night. He called it "bad timing on my part" in introducing the bill during an election season. "There was a lot of opposition that came in. People weren't paying attention" to the emergence of the bill during a work session last month, he said.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2010
Have you ever driven 40 mph or more on a street posted at 25 mph? I have – though I have attempted to restrain myself in recent years – and I suspect most Maryland motorists have done so at one time or another. Like many of us, I've been lucky too in that I've never been caught speeding except on a major highway. But a demonstration this week of how even what most of us consider minor increases in speed affect the ability to stop for a pedestrian brought home the reality of how dangerous it is to flout the posted limits.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
Pedestrians be damned! That must be what some people are thinking in regard to the condition of local sidewalks. Now, a full month after the snow, there are still many sidewalks that are simply unusable. I just came back from a run on this glorious sunny day, and for much of the distance I was forced to run in the street (sorry, mom, yes, I am fine) because of large, lingering mounds of snow. Loch Raven Boulevard, Goucher Boulevard, Hillen Road, Burke Avenue, Bosley Avenue, Kenilworth Avenue, Towsontown Boulevard, and Bellona Road all had large portions of sidewalk (in public areas, residential areas and in front of businesses, the jail, university property and a firehouse)
NEWS
March 10, 2010
Pedestrians be damned! That must be what some people are thinking in regard to the condition of local sidewalks. Now, a full month after the snow, there are still many sidewalks that are simply unusable. I just came back from a run on this glorious sunny day, and for much of the distance I was forced to run in the street (sorry, mom, yes, I am fine) because of large, lingering mounds of snow. Loch Raven Boulevard, Goucher Boulevard, Hillen Road, Burke Avenue, Bosley Avenue, Kenilworth Avenue, Towsontown Boulevard, and Bellona Road all had large portions of sidewalk (in public areas, residential areas and in front of businesses, the jail, university property and a firehouse)
NEWS
December 15, 2012
Fifty years ago, I had a wild ride with another teen driver who must have set numerous speed records for residential areas. "Don't worry," he assured me, "it's the slow drivers who cause all the accidents. " A month later, he totaled the family car. I was reminded of this by the recent letter in which a writer advocates raising speed limits to solve the speeding problem ("Raise the speed limit by 10 mph, then make it stick," Dec. 12). That doesn't work; studies by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety have shown that many drivers will exceed the speed limit no matter how high you set it. What really jumped out at me was his assertion that "drivers obeying speed limits that are set too low cause accidents when other people are forced to change lanes trying to get around them.
NEWS
October 26, 2007
Developments President Bush (shown above with a couple who lost their home) surveyed the damage in the hard-hit community of Rancho Bernardo. He declared seven counties a major disaster area, making residents eligible for federal assistance to help them rebuild. Four charred bodies were found in an apparent migrant camp east of San Diego that was burned by a wildfire straddling the Mexican border, authorities said yesterday. If the fire was responsible for the deaths, it would raise the toll to seven people.
NEWS
By ROCHELLE McCONKIE and ROCHELLE McCONKIE,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
Anne Arundel has become the first county in Maryland to enforce the state's more stringent noise pollution laws, County Executive John R. Leopold said this week. Under the agreement forged with Maryland Secretary of the Environment Shari T. Wilson, police can fine people up to $10,000 for each day they are cited for exceeding 65 decibels from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., and 75 decibels at other times. Previously, the county noise ordinances did not have specified decibel limits. "If it's a one-time, brief, loud noise, that's usually not going to cause a great deal of heartburn," Leopold said in an interview.
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