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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
With state money for the county's Resident Trooper Program likely todisappear by July, Commissioner President Donald I. Dell has been suggesting that this is the time for Carroll to create its own police force."
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | January 26, 1992
At times Wednesday evening, nine of the county's top law enforcementofficials acted like a group of college students berating their teachers for giving them too much work to do in too little time."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 9, 1992
A tentative and somewhat fuzzy picture of what a county-run police force would look like was developed last week.After their third two-hour meeting, members of the county's police study committee came up Wednesday night with a sketchy outline of such a force, stressing that nothing they discussed would necessarily end up being recommendedto the commissioners.The force would consist of a chief, one major, two lieutenants, six sergeants, 45 officers and 11 non-uniformed employees. An existing9,000- to 11,000-square-foot building would be renovated into a headquarters and jail.
NEWS
June 23, 1995
Carroll County residents have always accepted as an article of faith that using the resident trooper program of the Maryland State Police is the best means of protecting lives and property. After two embarrassing incidents this month, the relationship between the state police and the county needs to be re-examined.The failure of the state police to respond to a report of vandalism in New Windsor in the early hours of June 11 was inexcusable. After receiving a call about a band of juveniles rampaging through town vandalizing cars and buildings, the duty officer said he could not dispatch anyone on the basis of one complaint.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Three new troopers, graduates of the 105th Trooper Candidate Class, will begin work in Carroll on Jan. 3, Lt. Bruce Tanner, commander of the Westminster barracks, told the county commissioners Wednesday.The lieutenant said four additional troopers will be transferred to the barracks on March 1, but that Tfc. Matt Jones, now assigned to Westminster, will be transferred to the Hagerstown barracks."The three new troopers will spend eight weeks training with seasoned troopers and, hopefully, will be permanently assigned here," Lieutenant Tanner said.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | December 2, 1993
Union Bridge and New Windsor officials are considering additional police coverage, despite their opinion that each town's needs are being served adequately by the state police Resident Trooper Program.Officials in each town have been investigating the options because residents have complained about the enforcement provided by the current arrangement -- one trooper for whom the towns share expenses and who patrols each town for four hours five days a week."Knock on wood, Union Bridge's crime is nothing compared to some other areas.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
The dedication yesterday of the $3.1 million state police barracks in Westminster was, said Lt. Terry Katz, "a perfect time to reflect on the past and look to the future."Katz was joined by Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, state Treasurer Richard N. Dixon and other state and local police and civilian dignitaries who welcomed past barracks commanders, including Carroll County Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning.Katz also welcomed the return of a half-dozen retired troopers who opened the old barracks in 1961 and most of the first 10 resident troopers.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1997
Construction of the new state police barracks in Westminster, delayed a year by the State Highway Administration's concerns over road design, is on target for a spring groundbreaking, authorities say.Bids for construction are to be advertised soon and are expected back by the end of January, said William S. Ebere of the facilities management division of the Maryland State Police in Pikesville.Weather permitting, construction could begin in March or April, meaning that the new 11,600-square-foot barracks might be completed by June 1999, Ebere said.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 23, 1992
To former Sheriff Grover N. "Sam" Sensabaugh, three years is far toolong a wait for a county-run police force.But to just about everybody else on the commissioners' police force study committee, putting the first patrol officers of a Carroll department on the streets ispractically impossible before January 1995.As the 10-member committee met Wednesday night, they hammered outearly projections on the time and expense necessary for establishinga county police force.And while all of them agreed that some start-up time was needed -- to hire a planner, build or renovate a headquarters building, draw up policies and procedures, hire a chief and interview officers -- Sensabaugh didn't seem to think that the processrequired the two years that others in the committee were proposing.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
State and local officials will break ground tomorrow for a Maryland State Police barracks in Westminster.A one-story, 11,900-square-foot facility will replace the existing barracks, state police said. The $3 million project could be completed by summer 1999.Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Maryland State Police Superintendent Col. David B. Mitchell are expected to attend the 11 a.m. groundbreaking ceremony at the barracks at 1100 Baltimore Blvd.The new barracks will include a 4,200-square-foot garage, and will be built slightly west of the existing facility, said Lt. Leonard M. Armstrong, commander of the Westminster barracks.
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