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By BILL ATKINSON | February 15, 2005
MICHAEL A. CONTE used to be a big shot. He ran RESI, Towson University's respected economic think tank, oversaw more than 100 employees and was responsible for bringing in millions in revenue. He was so busy he hired people to buy his groceries, clean his house and fix his computer when it broke. He bought clothes, cars and anything else he wanted on his six-figure salary. He could be abrasive and opinionated, too. But a bitter contract dispute over his firing killed his dream of making RESI an internationally known economic power.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 31, 2007
I have heard it from merchants. I've heard it from car dealers, Realtors and bankers. Sure, Maryland's economy is slowing, they concede. Homes are sitting empty. Store sales are sinking. Loans are going bust. But the thousands of jobs that the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission is shifting here will not only keep Maryland out of trouble but ensure decent growth even if the country goes into recession. If only it were so. Base realignment will limit any pain, true. But the defense jobs moving here are a smaller part of the economy than many believe, and their potential effects have been widely exaggerated.
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BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
For the second time in four years, a prominent economist is departing Towson University's economics research arm, RESI Research & Consulting. Anirban Basu, the director of applied economics and senior economist, will leave the organization next month to be chairman, chief executive and chief economist of an independent economics research and consulting firm in East Baltimore. Basu and an economist who recently left the Johns Hopkins University launched Optimal Solutions Group LLC about two months ago. "There was this desire to be entrepreneurial and ... to build something new," said Basu, 34. "There is not a lot left for me to do at RESI."
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | February 15, 2005
MICHAEL A. CONTE used to be a big shot. He ran RESI, Towson University's respected economic think tank, oversaw more than 100 employees and was responsible for bringing in millions in revenue. He was so busy he hired people to buy his groceries, clean his house and fix his computer when it broke. He bought clothes, cars and anything else he wanted on his six-figure salary. He could be abrasive and opinionated, too. But a bitter contract dispute over his firing killed his dream of making RESI an internationally known economic power.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
Michael A. Conte, who founded and built the Regional Economic Studies Institute at Towson University into a respected regional force, is out as director of that organization, Conte and the university acknowledged yesterday."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
Michael Conte, the former director of Towson University's well-known RESI economic institute, created the institute and ran it for nine years before the university wrongfully fired him, his lawyer told a Baltimore County jury yesterday. "The institute was his idea, his creation, his baby, and to have it taken away from him has just been crushing," said Philip Zipin, Conte's lawyer. But the university's lawyers told the jury yesterday that Conte mismanaged the institute, alienated the staff and ran up a debt of nearly $1 million before he was fired for incompetence in 1998.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Maryland's economy should remain healthy for the next nine months, and its strength beyond that depends on the national economy, economists at the 1999 Economic Outlook Conference said yesterday.The most telling statistic to emerge from the conference, which was sponsored by the Regional Economic Studies Institute (RESI) at Towson University, is the forecast of a 1.7 percent employment growth rate in the state despite an expected national slowdown, the economists said.The employment growth rate for 1998 is projected to be 2.1 percent, and that was for a year with a robust national economy, the economists said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2001
A Baltimore County Circuit Court jury awarded $927,000 yesterday to Michael A. Conte, a former Towson University professor who sued the school for firing him as director of the RESI economic institute in 1998. A jury of 10 women deliberated seven hours before finding that the university breached its five-year contract by firing Conte after two years as director of RESI, which does economic research for state and private agencies. Conte said that he considers the verdict a moral, but not a financial, victory.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
Michael A. Conte, who founded and built an economic think tank into a respected regional force before he was dismissed from Towson University in 1998, is seeking nearly $250,000 in bonus pay from the college, according to documents filed at the Circuit Court of Special Appeals in Annapolis. The events surrounding Conte's dismissal as director of the Regional Economic Studies Institute (RESI) were also detailed in the court documents. Conte and the university had previously declined to elaborate on what prompted his departure.
NEWS
November 23, 2003
TOWSON UNIVERSITY'S respected RESI economic research institute spent months analyzing other states' tax revenues from legal slot machines, and its study underscores an obvious bottom line worth repeating often in advance of the opening of the Maryland legislature in January. Unfortunately, the study, released this week, also provides some potentially misleading fodder. First, the simple but useful truth: If the main reason for legalizing slots is to generate more money to help heal Maryland's long-term structural budget deficit, then the state must insist on the highest possible cut of the take.
NEWS
November 23, 2003
TOWSON UNIVERSITY'S respected RESI economic research institute spent months analyzing other states' tax revenues from legal slot machines, and its study underscores an obvious bottom line worth repeating often in advance of the opening of the Maryland legislature in January. Unfortunately, the study, released this week, also provides some potentially misleading fodder. First, the simple but useful truth: If the main reason for legalizing slots is to generate more money to help heal Maryland's long-term structural budget deficit, then the state must insist on the highest possible cut of the take.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
For the second time in four years, a prominent economist is departing Towson University's economics research arm, RESI Research & Consulting. Anirban Basu, the director of applied economics and senior economist, will leave the organization next month to be chairman, chief executive and chief economist of an independent economics research and consulting firm in East Baltimore. Basu and an economist who recently left the Johns Hopkins University launched Optimal Solutions Group LLC about two months ago. "There was this desire to be entrepreneurial and ... to build something new," said Basu, 34. "There is not a lot left for me to do at RESI."
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2002
The economies of Maryland and the nation will likely struggle in the first half of next year, but then should perk up as businesses begin increasing investment in their operations, an economist said yesterday. Anirban Basu, senior economist at RESI Research & Consulting, Towson University's economics research arm, said corporations that have been slashing budgets will pump money into new computer systems and telecommunications equipment, giving the economy a boost in the second half of next year.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 6, 2002
LAST APRIL a state trade group declared Manugistics Inc. to be the "Firm of the Year" and a "pacesetter" in Maryland's technology industry. Unfortunately, the award was well-deserved. Rockville-based Manugistics, which creates software linking industrial producers with vendors, lost $48 million last quarter, is laying off as many as 166 people and boasts a stock that sells for approximately 4 percent of its price two years ago. Behold the pacesetter. Other firms are doing what they can to keep up. Corvis Corp.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
The Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation, with one of the state's busiest Web sites, is selling banner ads to defray the cost of maintaining the site. The department joins at least one other Maryland state Web site and a small number of other states and municipalities across the country that sell ads or sponsorships to offset technology costs. The site owes its popularity mainly to a free, searchable database that anyone can use to research 2 million real property accounts within the state's borders.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2002
The state's Web site for researching real estate transfers has undergone a significant overhaul in an effort to provide the public with more information on Maryland house sales. Instead of finding information on just the most recent sale, users will now be able to research deeper into the sales history of a house. The site will show the sales history of a property up to the last three transactions. "We remain the only state in the country whereby you can search real property assessment and ownership information," said Ronald W. Wineholt, director of the state's Department of Assessments and Taxation.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | October 10, 2001
ECONOMIST Michael Conte got on Towson University's bad side long before his bosses there accused him of incompetence and betrayal. It was the bonus. As director of the university's RESI economics institute, Conte thought he was owed $124,000 in incentive pay for 1997. That was on top of a base salary of $127,000. It must have seemed outrageous. Even Towson's full professors made an average of only $57,000 at the time, and top school administrators apparently balked at the idea of an employee making more than they did. University President Hoke L. Smith earned $140,000 that year, a school spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2002
The economies of Maryland and the nation will likely struggle in the first half of next year, but then should perk up as businesses begin increasing investment in their operations, an economist said yesterday. Anirban Basu, senior economist at RESI Research & Consulting, Towson University's economics research arm, said corporations that have been slashing budgets will pump money into new computer systems and telecommunications equipment, giving the economy a boost in the second half of next year.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Though the United States has clearly dropped into recession, government moves forced by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks virtually guarantee that the downturn will be milder than that of 1990-1991, a local think tank's chief economist predicted yesterday. Maryland should suffer less than it did in the last recession and benefit more from the rebound, added Anirban Basu, chief economist at RESI Research & Consulting, a Towson University think tank. The promised infusion of billions by the federal government, in tandem with the central bank's aggressive interest-rate-cutting campaign, should shorten the recession and hasten the rebound this time around, he said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | October 10, 2001
ECONOMIST Michael Conte got on Towson University's bad side long before his bosses there accused him of incompetence and betrayal. It was the bonus. As director of the university's RESI economics institute, Conte thought he was owed $124,000 in incentive pay for 1997. That was on top of a base salary of $127,000. It must have seemed outrageous. Even Towson's full professors made an average of only $57,000 at the time, and top school administrators apparently balked at the idea of an employee making more than they did. University President Hoke L. Smith earned $140,000 that year, a school spokeswoman said.
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