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Resettlement

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NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | September 19, 1990
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has agreed to reimburse the state for 30 days' resettlement expenses for 62 foreigners who arrived at Baltimore-Washington International Airport from Kuwait last week without any money, jobs or places to live.The reimbursement was approved on Monday after federal officials recognized a need for long-term support for hundreds of people who fled their besieged homeland but had no ties in the United States.The Maryland Department of Human Resources, which coordinated the reception efforts at the airport, planned to go before the state Board of Public Works today to seek approval of a contract with the New Windsor Service Center in Carroll County.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Maryland officials said Wednesday that most of the more than 2,800 immigrant children who have come to the state from Central America this year have been resettled with family members. Fewer than 50 are housed in a group setting at any one time, said Human Resources Secretary Ted Dallas, and only for less than a month while awaiting placement in a private home. He said the facility is in Baltimore County but declined to say where. Dallas said the children have shown themselves to be resilient in the face of the problems of their homelands and the arduous journeys that brought them to the nation's southern border.
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NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | August 30, 1993
DALLAS -- Bewildered and anxious, Mohemmed and Hussein find it difficult to comprehend that they and thousands of their fellow former Iraqi soldiers are at the center of a budding controversy.Just a few months ago, they sat in refugee camps, waiting for a chance to escape the threat of death. And they thought they had found it in places like Dallas. But last week, mounting criticism about their presence in this country shattered their peace."There is fear now among our people," said the 26-year-old Hussein, who, like Mohemmed, 25, would allow only part of his name to be used.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
As a boy, Abdi Hassen helped his father nurture and harvest maize, wheat and tropical fruits — until the early 1990s, when his father vanished. "He was disappeared because of his political opinion. I don't know if he is alive or not now," said Hassen, a refugee from Ethiopia, as he stood among lush garden beds in a Highlandtown alley. Hassen, 31, spends much of his days in the alley, taking copious notes on the plants' progress and the pests that appear on their leaves. The garden is part of the International Rescue Committee's New Roots program, which aims to help refugees carry on the agricultural traditions of their homelands.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
HAGERSTOWN -- Mukhabbat Gilmanova picked plastic honey bottles off the assembly line and placed them, still warm, in a cardboard box. Gilmanova, a Russian Turkish refugee with a shy smile, might seem an anomaly in this Western Maryland city that's not exactly known for its international population. But another Meskhetian Turk works beside Gilmanova at Parker Plastics. Other packers on the shift hail from Haiti and the Ivory Coast. They are refugees, too. In the past several years, more than 200 people, largely from countries in Africa and the former Soviet Union, have quietly landed in Hagerstown, population roughly 37,000.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 25, 1993
NEW YORK -- Kareem Jakubovic fights his memories, trying to push the atrocities of Bosnia's war from the forefront of his mind. Perhaps his anxiety about starting a new life in the United States, he says, will distract him from worse thoughts.Mr. Jakubovic is among the first batch of 500 refugees from Bosnia and Herzegovina to land in the United States. A survivor of two concentration camps in Bosnia, he arrived in New York last week on his way to resettlement in Detroit. He was wide-eyed at the busy Manhattan streets, and he scoffed at the flavor of his first beer, a Heineken, which he found watery.
NEWS
June 5, 1995
Harry N. Rosenfield, 83, who helped create the federal school lunch program in 1946, then supervised the resettlement of European refugees in the United States, died Friday at his home in Washington.In 1946, as the chief assistant to the administrator of the Federal Security Agency, a precursor of the Department of Health and Human Services, he helped draft the legislation that created the school lunch program.Two years later, after serving as delegate to the U.N. Economic and Social Council in Geneva, President Harry S. Truman named him commissioner of the Displaced Persons Commission, which was responsible for supervising the admission and resettlement of refugees after World War II.By the time the commission expired four years later, he and a staff of 2,500 had helped bring more than 500,000 refugees to the United States.
NEWS
By Courtland Robinson | June 20, 2007
Today is World Refugee Day, when more than 70 countries around the globe are commemorating the humanity of 33 million people displaced inside and outside their countries and the inhumanity that has forced them to leave their homes. The Scandinavian countries are launching a campaign, "Let's Keep Them Safe," aimed at discouraging forced repatriation of refugees and asylum-seekers. Angola is holding a poetry contest to raise awareness about sexual and gender-based violence. Brazil will host a soccer tournament, Nepal is sponsoring a film festival, and Romania has organized a handicrafts bazaar.
NEWS
By Annie Wilson | June 20, 2002
TODAY IS World Refugee Day. It is no cause for celebration. There are about 15 million refugees in the world, of whom 80 percent are women and children. Some are eking out an existence in cities far from their homelands; many live in squalor in refugee camps of neighboring countries. Very few - less than 1 percent - of the world's refugees get a chance to start a new life in a third country. The United States is the leader in refugee resettlement. The president, in consultation with Congress, determines each year how many refugees may come here and from which countries they may come.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
More than 100 people shared information on refugees and resettlement opportunities at the Maryland Refugee Advisory Council's annual meeting last week in New Windsor, officials said this week.The council met Dec. 2 with Lavinia Limon, director of the Federal Office of Refugee Resettlement, and state coordinators from Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, D.C., at the Brethren Service Center."Everyone wants to work together to help refugees fit into society and become self-sufficient," said Kathleen Campanella, the center's public information coordinator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Duff Goldman quite literally ate his way across America to film the series "Sugar High" last year - from sea to sugary sea. And we aren't talking Hollywood smoke-and-mirrors eating, where it looks like someone is tasting something but is really spitting it into an off-camera bucket. It was real - all too real, as Goldman now realizes. Bread pudding. S'mores. Apple strudel. Mousse. Maple bacon doughnuts. Bananas Foster. Fried dough. Cookies. Pie. "I was literally eating dessert all day, every day, for seven weeks straight," he says, explaining how he "blew up," gaining no less than 30 pounds, though he was too depressed to get on the scale to see an actual number.
NEWS
By Jill Pardini | June 4, 2012
"Welcome to America. " It's a traditional greeting that implicitly embodies notions of acceptance, hope and opportunity. But that simple phrase can also be used as a taunt, as I witnessed during a youth soccer game in Baltimore where the teams were starkly divided by race, religion and language. "Welcome to America" served as a derisive cheer hurled across the field when the fairer-skinned team scored against a team made up of refugees and asylum seekers from Nepal, Bhutan, Iraq, Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia, Eritrea, Tanzania and Guinea.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 31, 2009
At first, the police only beat her. They had come to the two-room stone house where Abeba Hagos Enday lived with her four children to conscript her husband into the Eritrean army. When she told them - truthfully, she says - that she didn't know where he was, they gave her an ultimatum: Find him before we come back, or we will kill you. "I had to leave," Enday says through an interpreter. Enday, 39, is one of about four dozen Eritreans who have arrived in Baltimore since July, the first members of a group that resettlement officials expect to rival the current big three - Iraqis, Bhutanese and Burmese - in admissions during the next year.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | January 12, 2008
A Baltimore group dedicated to rescuing abused and abandoned dogs and cats has been selected to foster three pit bulls formerly housed at kennels in rural Virginia owned by suspended NFL quarterback Michael Vick, who was convicted of federal dogfighting charges. The dogs have been taken to Maryland and are being housed with various "foster families," according to members of Recycled Love Inc., a volunteer nonprofit organization. The locations of the dogs are not being made public for fear that someone interested in having a "Vick dog" might steal them.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
A whopping 1 percent of the 36,000 people of Hagerstown were born outside the United States, so maybe the attempt to resettle about 40 refugees a year there was asking for trouble. In any case, trouble was what it got. A few townspeople were up in arms over the hiring of refugees - mostly from Africa and the former Soviet Union - at a local plastics plant. Theirs, by the way, were among the 2,000 jobs that Hagerstown has added just since 2006. Then a pregnant woman from Burundi had a spell of morning sickness on a public street, and once the hazmat team had arrived in full moonsuit get-up, you could guess that the municipal welcome mat wasn't going to stay out much longer.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
HAGERSTOWN -- Mukhabbat Gilmanova picked plastic honey bottles off the assembly line and placed them, still warm, in a cardboard box. Gilmanova, a Russian Turkish refugee with a shy smile, might seem an anomaly in this Western Maryland city that's not exactly known for its international population. But another Meskhetian Turk works beside Gilmanova at Parker Plastics. Other packers on the shift hail from Haiti and the Ivory Coast. They are refugees, too. In the past several years, more than 200 people, largely from countries in Africa and the former Soviet Union, have quietly landed in Hagerstown, population roughly 37,000.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 6, 2000
WASHINGTON - The United States will vote against a World Bank loan to resettle thousands of Chinese farmers on Tibetan land, a move that could derail yet again a project that has become a lightning rod for criticism of the lender, a Tibetan advocacy group said yesterday. The bank's executive board is scheduled to vote today on whether to lend the $40 million to China to finance the resettlement. The United States voted against the loan when it was proposed last year, triggering an internal investigation by the bank, so its decision this time around is considered crucial.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dana Kinker and Dana Kinker,Sun reporter | June 14, 2007
Fleeing their homes and former lives to escape danger and persecution, refugees from countries including Burma, Iran, Somalia and Sudan settle in Southeast Baltimore seeking new lives and new opportunities, but not without facing hardships in the process. The personal accounts of the difficulties and triumphs of area refugees can be heard at "Voices of Refuge," a celebration of the United Nation's World Refuge Day, which will be held at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson tomorrow at 8 p.m. Presented by the International Rescue Committee of Baltimore and Por la Avenida, the event provides area refugees the opportunity to gather, and others the opportunity to learn about the lives and cultures of their refugee neighbors.
NEWS
By Courtland Robinson | June 20, 2007
Today is World Refugee Day, when more than 70 countries around the globe are commemorating the humanity of 33 million people displaced inside and outside their countries and the inhumanity that has forced them to leave their homes. The Scandinavian countries are launching a campaign, "Let's Keep Them Safe," aimed at discouraging forced repatriation of refugees and asylum-seekers. Angola is holding a poetry contest to raise awareness about sexual and gender-based violence. Brazil will host a soccer tournament, Nepal is sponsoring a film festival, and Romania has organized a handicrafts bazaar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dana Kinker and Dana Kinker,Sun reporter | June 14, 2007
Fleeing their homes and former lives to escape danger and persecution, refugees from countries including Burma, Iran, Somalia and Sudan settle in Southeast Baltimore seeking new lives and new opportunities, but not without facing hardships in the process. The personal accounts of the difficulties and triumphs of area refugees can be heard at "Voices of Refuge," a celebration of the United Nation's World Refuge Day, which will be held at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson tomorrow at 8 p.m. Presented by the International Rescue Committee of Baltimore and Por la Avenida, the event provides area refugees the opportunity to gather, and others the opportunity to learn about the lives and cultures of their refugee neighbors.
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