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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
The creeks are full, the fields are soggy, and the drought that had Maryland farmers and water managers so worried late last year is finally behind us. "Certainly in Maryland, there's no drought left," said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the National Climate Prediction Center in Camp Springs. "It's hard to get 8 inches of rain and still have drought." Improved rainfall in recent months has nearly filled Baltimore's three reservoirs. Farmers in Southern Maryland, where the dry conditions lingered longest, are happy.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
This spring it is likely that fishing with live aquatic bait again will be permitted in Liberty, Prettyboy and Loch Raven reservoirs, which had been closed to the use of live bait for fear that contaminated bait might lead to zebra mussel infestation in Baltimore's water supply.A proposed regulation has been approved and forwarded by the Department of Natural Resources for implementation on Feb. 14, following a public hearing and an open period for public comment on the regulation.In order for live bait to be used in the reservoirs, it must be purchased from a dealer whose source of supply and holding equipment has been certified free of zebra mussels by the DNR.The regulation was formulated with the cooperation of the Department of Public Works and the Maryland Aquatic Resources Coalition.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1999
Hurricane Floyd caused record stream flows in many Chesapeake Bay tributaries, dumped 5 billion gallons of water into Baltimore-area reservoirs and may have ended the region's lingering drought."
NEWS
By Bill Burton | March 1, 1992
Six or seven years ago, a transoceanic ship discharged freshwater ballast into one of the Great Lakes to start a series of events that have struck home in Carroll County.That is how fisheries scientistsin Ohio figure the zebra mussel hitchhiked to North America from Europe. Quickly, Lake St. Clair was infested, then Lake Erie, followed by others in the Great Lakes chain and, eventually, spreading into NewYork and the St. Lawrence River.Infestations were detected last year in the upper Susquehanna River.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
Maryland may be suffering through one of its worst droughts ever, but Baltimore-area residents hooked up to the city's water system have little cause to worry that their faucets will run dry anytime soon.Despite assertions by state officials that all of Maryland is gripped by a water crisis, the regional network of reservoirs and pipelines developed by Baltimore over the past century has secured enough of the precious liquid to last well into next year, even if the skies yield not another drop, its overseer says.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2002
Ten days of April showers gave Baltimore its first month of above-normal rainfall since August, according to the National Weather Service. But forecasters say the region still faces a serious water shortage problem. Rainfall at Baltimore-Washington International Airport totaled just more than 4 inches. That was an inch more than the April norm -- an inch now subtracted from the 12-inch deficit that had accumulated since August. The bonus rains kept farmers in business, but it has not rescued the region from drought.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 2003
As the Bush administration spends hundreds of millions of dollars to repair the pipes and pumps above ground that carry Iraq's oil, it has not addressed serious problems with Iraq's underground oil reservoirs, which American and Iraqi experts say could severely limit the amount of oil those fields produce. In northern Iraq, the large but aging Kirkuk field suffers from too much water seeping into its oil deposits, the experts say, and similar problems are evident in the oil fields in southern Iraq.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | July 22, 1991
Baltimore area residents have a chance tomorrow night to speak out on whether they want logging and recreation in the forests around the reservoirs that supply drinking water to 1.6 million city and suburban residents.A public meeting has been scheduled at 7 p.m. at Loch Raven High School in Baltimore County to seek citizen comments on the city's management of the watersheds of Loch Raven, Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs in Baltimore and Carroll counties.The meeting marks the first time that city officials have sought public comment on their oversight of the more than 17,000 acres of forests and open space surrounding the three reservoirs.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
With water levels falling in Baltimore's drought-depleted reservoirs, the voluntary water conservation efforts the city has urged on customers since January may no longer be enough. The city's water managers say they are "seriously considering" imposing mandatory curbs on water consumption. "Voluntary conservation helped us early on. But with the continued heat and dry weather, we have not achieved the goals we were seeking," said city Public Works Director George L. Winfield, in a statement read by DPW spokesman Kurt L. Kocher.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,Sun reporter | June 30, 2008
For the past eight months, Luke Brackett has been part administrator, part lone ranger. Hired by Baltimore City in November to spearhead the creation of a new police force to protect the three city-owned reservoirs in Baltimore and Carroll counties, Brackett spends part of his days patrolling the watersheds and part interviewing applicants interested in joining his force. "I'm tasked with bringing the department to life," Brackett said. "We're still getting our feet wet, no pun intended."
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