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NEWS
April 10, 1992
Because Maryland's Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski thinks the top Pentagon command is "dead wrong" in its structuring of the active and reserve forces, and we think it is "dead right," her judgment call on this military issue requires further examination.In a letter to The Sun published April 3, Ms. Mikulski, a Democrat, said she opposes "slashing cuts" in the National Guard and reserves announced by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney."In the 'new world order,' we need a smaller force that can respond quickly to emergencies and maintain our flexible response capability," the senator wrote.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon began alerting 43,000 Reserve and National Guard troops late yesterday for the possibility of yearlong duty in Iraq or Kuwait as part of a rotation plan that would reduce the overall U.S. military presence in Iraq by next spring, senior military officials said. The alert warnings and deployment orders approved yesterday by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld reflected deep concern by Pentagon officials - and within the administration - over stresses that large mobilizations have placed on reservists and their families.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon began alerting 43,000 Reserve and National Guard troops late yesterday for the possibility of yearlong duty in Iraq or Kuwait as part of a rotation plan that would reduce the overall U.S. military presence in Iraq by next spring, senior military officials said. The alert warnings and deployment orders approved yesterday by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld reflected deep concern by Pentagon officials - and within the administration - over stresses that large mobilizations have placed on reservists and their families.
NEWS
By Craig Gordon and Craig Gordon,NEWSDAY | October 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - After failing to attract large numbers of foreign peacekeepers to Iraq, the Pentagon is drawing up plans to rotate in as many as 30,000 more reservists early next year, despite growing worries in Congress about strains on the force, defense officials said yesterday. These troops would join three 5,000-strong Army National Guard brigades already in line to go to Iraq as part of an expected yearlong rotation to replace U.S. troops now in Iraq. U.S. Marines also may be sent back into Iraq by February to ease the burden on overstretched Army forces that normally shoulder U.S. peacekeeping duties.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - In coming weeks, tens of thousands of National Guard and Reserve forces, from military truck drivers in South Dakota and engineers in Utah to Special Forces soldiers in Maryland, are expected to be called to active duty, part of a huge buildup aimed at forcing Iraq to disarm or face war. The number could rise to more than 30,000 this month and swell to more than 200,000 throughout the winter, perhaps rivaling the 265,000 reservists called...
NEWS
By Craig Gordon and Craig Gordon,NEWSDAY | October 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - After failing to attract large numbers of foreign peacekeepers to Iraq, the Pentagon is drawing up plans to rotate in as many as 30,000 more reservists early next year, despite growing worries in Congress about strains on the force, defense officials said yesterday. These troops would join three 5,000-strong Army National Guard brigades already in line to go to Iraq as part of an expected yearlong rotation to replace U.S. troops now in Iraq. U.S. Marines also may be sent back into Iraq by February to ease the burden on overstretched Army forces that normally shoulder U.S. peacekeeping duties.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Dick Cheney authorized yesterday the call-up of an additional 72,500 National Guard and reserve troops to serve in Operation Desert Shield, an action certain to affect civilian life throughout the nation.The new authority, which does not require the approval of Congress, more than doubles the number of citizen-soldiers the Pentagon may call to active duty. The Army is expected to call up more of the 122,500 guardsmen and reservists now available than any other branch of the military.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 30, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The military draft should be resumed immediately if President Bush orders U.S. forces to drive Iraq from Kuwait, a former top Pentagon manpower official told Congress yesterday.Two senior Democratic senators -- Sam Nunn of Georgia and John Glenn of Ohio -- agreed. They warned that conscription might be necessary even if the United States refrained from war and decided instead to maintain a large military presence in Saudi Arabia while waiting for sanctions to force Iraq to retreat.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 2000
WASHINGTON -- An Air Force major at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware was charged yesterday with disobeying an order for refusing to take the Pentagon's mandatory anthrax vaccine, the first active-duty officer cited in a growing, nationwide revolt that has centered on National Guard and Reserve forces. Maj. Sonnie G. Bates, 35, a C-5 cargo plane pilot with 13 years of service and glowing reviews, could be sentenced to five years in prison for declining the six-shot regimen, saying he fears it is unsafe and untested.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - In what might be preliminary steps toward another war with Iraq, Army military planners are moving from Germany to the Persian Gulf, the Navy is speeding up deployment of carriers to the region and the Marines are conducting exercises in the remote expanses of the Kuwaiti desert. But the clearest signs that hostilities are imminent will first be apparent at the remote Air Force bases in the American Midwest and Southwest, where the country's radar-evading stealth aircraft are kept, as well as at a sleepy Army town in southern Kentucky, home to elite helicopter-borne troops.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - In coming weeks, tens of thousands of National Guard and Reserve forces, from military truck drivers in South Dakota and engineers in Utah to Special Forces soldiers in Maryland, are expected to be called to active duty, part of a huge buildup aimed at forcing Iraq to disarm or face war. The number could rise to more than 30,000 this month and swell to more than 200,000 throughout the winter, perhaps rivaling the 265,000 reservists called...
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - In what might be preliminary steps toward another war with Iraq, Army military planners are moving from Germany to the Persian Gulf, the Navy is speeding up deployment of carriers to the region and the Marines are conducting exercises in the remote expanses of the Kuwaiti desert. But the clearest signs that hostilities are imminent will first be apparent at the remote Air Force bases in the American Midwest and Southwest, where the country's radar-evading stealth aircraft are kept, as well as at a sleepy Army town in southern Kentucky, home to elite helicopter-borne troops.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The Bush administration is acknowledging, after years of government denials, that the nation's ability to fight a large-scale war overseas is in peril because of a crippling shortage of manpower in the U.S. merchant marine. William G. Schubert, Bush's maritime administrator, said in an interview that he does not believe the Pentagon could find enough sailors to operate its cargo ships if military forces were deployed for a sustained overseas campaign. He plans to pursue several immediate remedies, including pushing for the creation of a new Merchant Marine Reserve, and said solving the manpower crisis will be "a very top priority" of his administration.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 15, 2000
WASHINGTON -- An Air Force major at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware was charged yesterday with disobeying an order for refusing to take the Pentagon's mandatory anthrax vaccine, the first active-duty officer cited in a growing, nationwide revolt that has centered on National Guard and Reserve forces. Maj. Sonnie G. Bates, 35, a C-5 cargo plane pilot with 13 years of service and glowing reviews, could be sentenced to five years in prison for declining the six-shot regimen, saying he fears it is unsafe and untested.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A congressional watchdog agency and the Pentagon's inspector general are probing an insurance program that went awry when thousands of reservists ordered to Bosnia found they could collect $5,000 per month during their deployment in addition to their military pay.As a result of the apparent snafu, the Pentagon is scrambling to find at least $72 million to pay claims from about 3,000 reservists now in Bosnia who signed up for the hefty benefits...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has quietly begun a new effort to have U.S. university personnel, including college undergraduates, help out during international crises by performing some of the classified intelligence work now carried out by the agency's Washington headquarters staff.The idea, prompted by the CIA's current budgetary squeeze, is to arrange for students to be trained to help analyze intelligence about particular countries for which the agency is short of staff. Those students would then serve as a kind of reserve force that could be called to Washington in emergencies.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has quietly begun a new effort to have U.S. university personnel, including college undergraduates, help out during international crises by performing some of the classified intelligence work now carried out by the agency's Washington headquarters staff.The idea, prompted by the CIA's current budgetary squeeze, is to arrange for students to be trained to help analyze intelligence about particular countries for which the agency is short of staff. Those students would then serve as a kind of reserve force that could be called to Washington in emergencies.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The Bush administration is acknowledging, after years of government denials, that the nation's ability to fight a large-scale war overseas is in peril because of a crippling shortage of manpower in the U.S. merchant marine. William G. Schubert, Bush's maritime administrator, said in an interview that he does not believe the Pentagon could find enough sailors to operate its cargo ships if military forces were deployed for a sustained overseas campaign. He plans to pursue several immediate remedies, including pushing for the creation of a new Merchant Marine Reserve, and said solving the manpower crisis will be "a very top priority" of his administration.
NEWS
April 10, 1992
Because Maryland's Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski thinks the top Pentagon command is "dead wrong" in its structuring of the active and reserve forces, and we think it is "dead right," her judgment call on this military issue requires further examination.In a letter to The Sun published April 3, Ms. Mikulski, a Democrat, said she opposes "slashing cuts" in the National Guard and reserves announced by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney."In the 'new world order,' we need a smaller force that can respond quickly to emergencies and maintain our flexible response capability," the senator wrote.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 30, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The military draft should be resumed immediately if President Bush orders U.S. forces to drive Iraq from Kuwait, a former top Pentagon manpower official told Congress yesterday.Two senior Democratic senators -- Sam Nunn of Georgia and John Glenn of Ohio -- agreed. They warned that conscription might be necessary even if the United States refrained from war and decided instead to maintain a large military presence in Saudi Arabia while waiting for sanctions to force Iraq to retreat.
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