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Resentment

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NEWS
October 15, 2013
In a July 2011 interview with the Baltimore Business Journal, Rob Santoni Jr. admitted that his store had been paying the bottle tax instead of passing it on to consumers. So if the actual prices of beverages didn't increase, are we supposed to believe that consumers stopped shopping at Santoni's just because of their opposition to the idea of a bottle tax ("Highlandtown Santoni's folds," Oct. 14)? If their opposition to the tax was that strong, wouldn't they be more likely to support its most outspoken critic?
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Three men convicted in a Baltimore murder are seeking a new trial after a prosecutor made an issue of a white witness' living in a predominantly black neighborhood - a comment that the judge in the case said "smacks of racism. " In closing arguments this month, Assistant State's Attorney Theresa M. Shaffer asked the jury to carefully consider the words of a witness who testified that the victim of a West Baltimore killing might have been armed. "He don't want to be involved," she said.
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NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 1997
"Resentment," by Gary Indiana. New York: Doubleday. 303 pages. $22.95.Oprah won't choose Gary Indiana's nasty, hilarious, scarnew novel, "Resentment," for her book club, but it is an Event Novel nevertheless, a book you can bet your smart friends will read, a big bad tale of celebrities and media hangers-on and hustlers and murderers that takes place mostly in L.A., during the Martinez (read Menendez) murder trial, but also manages to dissect some of the New York literary world's most well-protected names.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
In a July 2011 interview with the Baltimore Business Journal, Rob Santoni Jr. admitted that his store had been paying the bottle tax instead of passing it on to consumers. So if the actual prices of beverages didn't increase, are we supposed to believe that consumers stopped shopping at Santoni's just because of their opposition to the idea of a bottle tax ("Highlandtown Santoni's folds," Oct. 14)? If their opposition to the tax was that strong, wouldn't they be more likely to support its most outspoken critic?
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | May 28, 1994
Former Washington Mayor Marion Barry's announcement last week that he will run again for the job he was forced to leave in disgrace four years ago -- and the apparent readiness of many Washingtonians to vote for him again -- ought to serve as an object lesson for those in Baltimore who are calling for the head of the embattled city comptroller, Jacqueline McLean.The lesson is that while both Mr. Barry and Ms. McLean suffered very public falls from grace, white and black voters perceive the nature of their transgressions quite differently.
NEWS
By New York Times | January 25, 1991
There are about 104,000 black men and women who, Defense Department statistics show, account for nearly 25 percent of the American troops in the Persian Gulf region and almost 30 percent of Army troops.Despite their numbers in the armed forces, blacks make up only 12 percent of the nation's civilian population. And as the gulf conflict moves closer to ground combat, a painful debate has divided many blacks about blacks' role in the war and in the military.The statistics documenting the number of blacks in the gulf have stirred a deep well of resentment and anger in some blacks, who fear that their community will pay disproportionately for a war that many of them do not support.
FEATURES
By From Ladies' Home Journal Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 19, 1994
Betty is fed up. "Dave gives more affection to the dog than he does to me," says the 38-year-old mother of three, who recently went back to work as a teacher. His indifference is driving her crazy: He doesn't listen when she talks, refuses to respond when she needs to discuss a problem, and never does anything around the house that he's promised to do.Betty hates nagging. "But Dave won't do anything unless I ask him a dozen times. He thinks his only responsibility is to bring home a paycheck," she says, fuming.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 4, 1992
MOMBASA, Kenya -- Most fleeing Somalians simply walk across the border to rough, massive refugee camps in the arid wastes of northeast Kenya. But the lucky ones -- and those with a little money left -- climb aboard the dhows making their way south to Kenya's golden coast."
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 5, 2001
JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia - With as many as 15 Saudis numbered among the 19 men suspected of steering jets into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon last month, the mood in this deeply conservative Islamic kingdom has lurched between genuine horror, profound embarrassment, shame, suppressed glee and - increasingly - resentment and bald denial. Beyond the gates of King Fahd's opulent palaces in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia's streets are steeped in angst and confusion - an extraordinary occurrence in a society guided by the iron absolutes of one of the strictest forms of Islam in the world.
FEATURES
By SUSAN DEITZ | September 12, 1993
Q: The major stumbling block in my relationship to "Dave," and the reason for my reluctance to commit to marry him, is sex. He feels that sex is unimportant and something of a chore. At 51, I heartily disagree. We make love once or twice a month, and he is very happy with that arrangement.I, on the other hand, believe that sex is an integral part of a relationship, an integral part of life. My sexuality is a source of energy, optimism and enthusiasm. I have discussed this with him, but mostly his response is sympathy for me because he thinks it must be terrible to be "oversexed and so dependent on base, animal responses."
NEWS
July 10, 2012
There was a time when city residents only had to do jury duty every 18 months if they reported for duty and weren't selected for a trial. If they served on a jury they weren't called for another three years. Now residents are called for duty every year. My co-worker received a summons for late summer after having served last fall. When she called the courthouse she was informed there was a "new system" that did not include the dates of residents' previous service, so that many people were being called back within a year.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
Saying the recent granting of probation before judgment for a drunken-driving charge was an illegal sentence, a special prosecutor is asking an Anne Arundel County judge for a new sentence for the director of the civil rights office of the Maryland Attorney General's Office. In mid-November, Carl O. Snowden was given probation before judgment on a drunken-driving charge for the second time in eight years. The advantage to probation before judgment, or PBJ, is that it allows a person to avoid a conviction if the terms of probation are successfully completed.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | April 28, 2010
It's the best spring ever, green and lush, and baby robins are chittering in their nest in the maple tree, and the smell of blossoms is in the air — and yet we dour Scots cannot forget that April 27 was the anniversary of our ignominious defeat at the Battle of Dunbar, our good King John stripped of his regalia, and the Stone of Scone hauled off to London. Yes, I know that 1296 seems like a long time ago, and maybe 714 years is a wee bit long to be grinding our teeth over a bad day on the battlefield, but we Scots nurse our resentments carefully.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | November 12, 2009
Mark Spitz says he's not bitter about losing swimming's most sacred record to Michael Phelps , who 15 months ago cemented a spot in Olympic history with eight gold medals, one more than Spitz won in 1972. "It's sort of like I'm the first man on the moon," Spitz said. "He's the second man on the moon. He collected more rocks." Phelps of Baltimore also is collecting scrutiny. "Of course, there's a lot of pressure," Spitz said. He said, "Michael is not a perfect person, and neither am I," a reference to Phelps' having been photographed last November inhaling from a marijuana pipe.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | September 8, 2009
Think back to the spring of 1968. The U.S. is mired in Vietnam. The country is in turmoil. The sitting Democratic president abruptly pulls out of his campaign for re-election, and the leading conservative columnist of the day neither gloats nor does a victory dance. It's nearly impossible to imagine this happening today. We could chalk this up to the deterioration of civic discourse and the rise in political polarization. But it's really part of a much more significant shift that has fractured the right side of the political spectrum.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2007
Outside the debate hall at Morgan State University, African-Americans across the political spectrum used the phrase "slap in the face" when expressing their frustration at the decision of four leading Republican presidential candidates to skip last night's debate. Eugene Morris and his wife flew in from Chicago to attend the nationally televised forum, which focused on issues important to minorities. "Obviously, when we planned this trip, we had no idea the leading candidates would insult us and our community by not showing up," said Morris, who owns a marketing and communications company.
NEWS
April 24, 2002
FOR THE NEXT two weeks, France, and the world, will witness the spectacle of an extreme nationalist right-winger as one of two candidates for president. Jean-Marie Le Pen, whose National Front party is built on poisonous resentments, shocked the nation by coming in second in Sunday's first round of balloting, edging out the Socialist prime minister, Lionel Jospin. Mr. Le Pen stands virtually no chance of winning in his face-off with Jacques Chirac, the incumbent, on May 5. But simply by getting to the second round, and muscling the left out of the race entirely, he has set off alarm bells throughout European politics.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Thurgood Marshall obviously will be remembered as the first black to serve on the Supreme Court and as the legal counsel for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People who won the case in 1954 in which the court overturned the doctrine of "separate but equal" education. But the tides of his lifetime also teach a lesson about how American attitudes in race keep changing, and not always for the better.Marshall came to the court as the nominee of President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967 in the wake of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 -- two pieces of landmark legislation that not only codified the rights of black Americans but seemed to define the national ethic on the race issue.
NEWS
June 29, 2007
The Senate majority that voted yesterday to crush what is almost certainly the last opportunity to fix America's broken immigration system for at least two years was responding to constituents with unreasonable expectations. Flogged into a fury by talk-show agitators and Internet provocateurs, thousands of people called, wrote and e-mailed their senators to protest legislation they believed would do nothing to stop the flow of illegal entry into this country, would forgive millions of illegals already here and would burden taxpayers with the cost to schools and health care.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | June 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The fallacy of hate crime laws - the prosecution of which requires a degree of mind-reading not yet available to most earthlings - has been cast into stark relief the past few weeks after reports of an interracial rape-murder that has bestirred white supremacists and led to death threats against an African-American columnist. The spark was the brutal rape-murder of a young white couple, Channon Christian and Christopher Newsom, who were carjacked in January in Knoxville, Tenn.
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