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By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
Breaking off a historic alliance between a biotech start-up and a basic research foundation, Human Genome Sciences Inc. and The Institute of Genomics Research (TIGR) yesterday ended a 5-year relationship in which Human Genome tried to invent new drugs based on TIGR's cutting-edge work in determining the basic structure of human genes.The deal saves Human Genome $38.2 million it would have owed TIGR for future research, and gives the nonprofit TIGR the freedom to pursue other funding, and to publish its research more quickly.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
A family that sued Johns Hopkins University over its intent to build high-rise buildings on a gift of land intended for a low-rise campus will appeal a judge's decision to allow the institution to move forward with its plans. In a statement, the relatives of Elizabeth Beall Banks—who with her family sold 108 acres of her family's Belward Farm to Hopkins for $5 million more than 20 years ago—said it would appeal an Oct. 26 ruling by Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin that removes all restrictions on the development of the property, which Hopkins intends to use for a research institution in Gaithersburg.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
The dean of Johns Hopkins medical school said yesterday that university officials will launch a $125 million research institute that will provide bench scientists with badly needed lab space and sophisticated new scientific instruments. "This will give us the ability to help graduate students and the faculty itself to be more innovative," said Dean Edward D. Miller. The institute, he said, will also allow the school to remain competitive with other top academic medical centers in the rapidly advancing fields of genetics and other fields of biology.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Gus Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
A decade-long effort to create a biotechnology park at Johns Hopkins in East Baltimore received a boost Wednesday when a new brain research institute that will be led by several renowned scientists announced plans to establish its headquarters there. Officials with the Lieber Institute for Brain Development announced their selection of the Hopkins-affiliated biopark over four other medical research institutions across the country that vied to become its permanent home. The institute, which is funded by an endowment of more than $100 million, is expected to employ up to 60 researchers focusing on schizophrenia, stem cells, neurobiology and other brain-related fields.
NEWS
August 10, 2009
On August 8, 2009, Stacey Ellison Waynick; A Graveside Service will be held at Parkwood Cemetery, (3310 Taylor Avenue) on Tuesday, August 11 at 11:00 AM. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to the H. Lee Moffit Cancer Center & Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, WCB-12507, Tampa, FL 33612-9416. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc. www.ruckfuneralhomes.com
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1990
An Evening Sun story Tuesday about Fort Detrick's research into protection against biological weapons neglected to mention that although the United States had once made the anthrax virus into a biological weapon, all American biological weapons stockpiles were destroyed in the early 1970s as part of an international treaty obligation. The Evening Sun regrets the error.FORT DETRICK -- When American troops went to Saud Arabia in August, researchers at Fort Detrick had to work fast to provide enough disease diagnostic kits, and train enough medical personnel to use them, so that soldiers in the field could be tested for diseases that might infect them naturally or through a biological weapons assault.
NEWS
March 4, 2004
A Fort Detrick researcher who officials feared might have been accidentally infected with the Ebola virus left the Army's quarantine unit yesterday, healthy and relieved to be free after nearly three weeks in enforced isolation. "She was very happy to get out, and she expressed her gratitude to everyone who supported her containment care," said Chuck Dasey, an Army spokesman. At the researcher's request, her name has not been released. The researcher, a virologist at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, grazed her hand with a needle Feb. 11 while inoculating Ebola-infected mice.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
WASHINGTON - Fort Detrick, where scientist Bruce E. Ivins worked for more than three decades, is the largest U.S. government research center focused primarily on biodefense. Set on a former airfield north of Frederick where the Maryland National Guard once based a fleet of biplanes, it houses dozens of labs. Chief among them is the military's main research facility on biological weapons, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), where Ivins and other microbiologists worked on anthrax and other deadly agents.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 24, 1994
After five years of work, plant scientists from the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines said yesterday that they had developed a new type of rice that would increase harvests by 20 percent to 25 percent.After the new variety becomes commercially available, probably in five years, it will eventually yield enough to feed 500 million more people than current rice yields, said Dr. Ken S. Fischer, the institute's director of research.The world's population, now estimated at 5.5 billion, is expected to reach 8.3 billion by 2025, according to the World Bank.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
A Massachusetts biotechnology company yesterday became the first corporation to strike a business arrangement with the Institute of Human Virology, the new research institute in Baltimore headed up by Dr. Robert Gallo, the co-discoverer of the AIDS virus.Hybridon Inc., a Cambridge-based firm that went public last year, said it has struck a five-year research-collaboration agreement with the institute.Funded with millions in state and city money, the institute opened to much fanfare -- and expectation -- late last year.
NEWS
August 10, 2009
On August 8, 2009, Stacey Ellison Waynick; A Graveside Service will be held at Parkwood Cemetery, (3310 Taylor Avenue) on Tuesday, August 11 at 11:00 AM. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to the H. Lee Moffit Cancer Center & Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, WCB-12507, Tampa, FL 33612-9416. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc. www.ruckfuneralhomes.com
FEATURES
August 21, 2008
* Dr. Johannes Bonatti, a heart surgeon specializing in minimally invasive heart bypass operations, has joined the Department of Surgery at the University of Maryland. Bonatti comes to Baltimore from Innsbruck University Hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, where he was a cardiac surgeon and an associate professor of surgery. He has performed more than 300 heart surgeries with robotic devices, mostly using endoscopic techniques that do not require incisions. * Jack Stansbury, previously a vice president of the St. Agnes Foundation Board and a member for five years, has been named chair of the Board of Directors.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
WASHINGTON - Fort Detrick, where scientist Bruce E. Ivins worked for more than three decades, is the largest U.S. government research center focused primarily on biodefense. Set on a former airfield north of Frederick where the Maryland National Guard once based a fleet of biplanes, it houses dozens of labs. Chief among them is the military's main research facility on biological weapons, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), where Ivins and other microbiologists worked on anthrax and other deadly agents.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | February 12, 2007
DUBNA, Russia -- The small, pleasant city of Dubna on the bank of the Volga River is known as Naukograd, or Science City, and for good reason: It lends its name to element 105 of the periodic table, dubnium, and is home to the research institute where the five newest elements were discovered. Russian scientists at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, collaborating with a team of American researchers at a laboratory in California, are pushing the boundaries of the tangible world and adding tantalizing tidbits to the understanding of the origin of life's chemical building blocks and how they behave.
NEWS
April 19, 2006
Anthrax escaped at Army lab in '01, '02 The Army's biological weapons defense laboratory at Fort Detrick probably had multiple episodes of anthrax contamination as workers strove to process a flood of samples sent there for testing in 2001 and 2002, an internal report says. The report contains previously undisclosed details about the sometimes sloppy practices that allowed anthrax spores to escape from biosafety containment labs at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
March 4, 2004
A Fort Detrick researcher who officials feared might have been accidentally infected with the Ebola virus left the Army's quarantine unit yesterday, healthy and relieved to be free after nearly three weeks in enforced isolation. "She was very happy to get out, and she expressed her gratitude to everyone who supported her containment care," said Chuck Dasey, an Army spokesman. At the researcher's request, her name has not been released. The researcher, a virologist at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, grazed her hand with a needle Feb. 11 while inoculating Ebola-infected mice.
NEWS
By ANN LoLORDO | April 3, 1994
Today, the Army's infectious disease research institute in Frederick is still using soldiers to test new vaccines for malaria, hepatitis, dengue fever and other exotic diseases.But the human testing program is subject to greater review than its predecessor of 20 years ago.Since 1975, when the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick revived its human testing program, there have been about 120 medical research projects with a need for an estimated 2,520 volunteers, according to Carol Linden, director of research plans and programs at the agency, known by its acronym, "USAMRIID."
FEATURES
August 21, 2008
* Dr. Johannes Bonatti, a heart surgeon specializing in minimally invasive heart bypass operations, has joined the Department of Surgery at the University of Maryland. Bonatti comes to Baltimore from Innsbruck University Hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, where he was a cardiac surgeon and an associate professor of surgery. He has performed more than 300 heart surgeries with robotic devices, mostly using endoscopic techniques that do not require incisions. * Jack Stansbury, previously a vice president of the St. Agnes Foundation Board and a member for five years, has been named chair of the Board of Directors.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
FREDERICK - Two of the nation's top military and civilian medical research institutes unveiled plans yesterday to work together on a huge expansion of high-security laboratories at Fort Detrick to devise better defenses against bioterrorism and emerging diseases. The first stage will be construction, beginning in 2004, of a $105 million laboratory equipped to handle the deadliest organisms in existence, including the Ebola virus. The so-called Biosafety Level 4 lab will be operated by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, whose main campus is at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2002
In recent weeks, FBI agents investigating the anthrax attacks that killed five people last fall have questioned a dozen biodefense scientists at Fort Detrick about former colleagues who have come under suspicion, according to employees of the Army's research institute in Frederick. At the same time, agents were poring over entry records to the high-security laboratory at the Army's Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, the only U.S. facility known to produce the kind of dry, fine-particle anthrax powder like that used in the mail attacks.
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