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By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
A 23-year-old Johns Hopkins research assistant was fatally stabbed Sunday night in Charles Village during an apparent robbery, two days before the victim's birthday, according to city police. Officers responded to a call of an attack at about 11:30 p.m. in the 2600 block of St. Paul St. and found the man in the road, suffering from stab wounds all over his body. The victim was transported to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was pronounced dead about 30 minutes later, police said. The victim was not identified, pending notification of kin. Police have made no arrests in the incident.
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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
On an invitingly bright summer day, the reading room at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania starts filling up nonetheless as soon as the doors open: professors, Ph.D. candidates and amateur genealogists alike stream in to spend hours perusing the yellowed letters and faded land records, the presidential papers and everyday ephemera that are stored in the group's vaults. While the staff continues to lend out such historic documents, it is with a warier eye now that the Philadelphia-based archive and others learn that they may have been victims of what investigators say was a veritable national treasure hunt by Barry Landau and Jason Savedoff to steal valuable artifacts.
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NEWS
April 14, 2007
Maravene Mae Hamburger, a retired Johns Hopkins University research assistant, died of heart disease April 5 at her Lutherville home. She was 92. Born Maravene Mae Deveney in York, Pa., she earned a chemistry degree from Goucher College in 1934. When she found no jobs available during the Depression, she enrolled at the Hopkins School of Nursing and received her degree in 1937. She became a visiting nurse and later returned to Hopkins and worked with newborn babies. She became a Hopkins chemistry department research assistant and later worked at McCormick & Co, and Becton, Dickinson labs.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
A 23-year-old Johns Hopkins research assistant was fatally stabbed Sunday night in Charles Village during an apparent robbery, two days before the victim's birthday, according to city police. Officers responded to a call of an attack at about 11:30 p.m. in the 2600 block of St. Paul St. and found the man in the road, suffering from stab wounds all over his body. The victim was transported to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was pronounced dead about 30 minutes later, police said. The victim was not identified, pending notification of kin. Police have made no arrests in the incident.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
On an invitingly bright summer day, the reading room at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania starts filling up nonetheless as soon as the doors open: professors, Ph.D. candidates and amateur genealogists alike stream in to spend hours perusing the yellowed letters and faded land records, the presidential papers and everyday ephemera that are stored in the group's vaults. While the staff continues to lend out such historic documents, it is with a warier eye now that the Philadelphia-based archive and others learn that they may have been victims of what investigators say was a veritable national treasure hunt by Barry Landau and Jason Savedoff to steal valuable artifacts.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1999
Lydia Owens Gillespie, a debutante and horsewoman who worked for 20 years as a medical research assistant at the Johns Hopkins University, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. She was 82.Born in Metuchen, N.J., she moved to England as a child, then to Baltimore, where her father, the late J. Hamilton Owens, was editor in chief of The Sunpapers from 1943 to 1956.She grew up at the family home in Riderwood, graduated from Roland Park Country School in 1936 and made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon.
NEWS
By RALPH CLAYTON | July 12, 2000
THOUSANDS of NAACP members descended on Baltimore for their convention this week, prompting visits to the major tourist attractions that line the Pratt Street corridor. What most of the hundreds of thousands of tourists who visit the Inner Harbor each year don't realize is that they are walking on sacred ground, where countless thousands of men, women, and children suffered during Baltimore's darkest hour. Between 1815 and 1860, traders in Baltimore made the port one of the leading disembarkation points for ships carrying slaves to New Orleans and other ports in the deep South.
NEWS
December 13, 1995
The report on how to support military families during peacekeeping deployments that University of Maryland military sociologist Mady Segal is helping write is being co-authored by D. Bruce Bell, a research scientist at the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, and Mary L. Stevens, a graduate student at the University of Maryland and a research assistant at the Army Research Institute.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
Evelyn Jean Connor, a retired Johns Hopkins medical research assistant, died of leukemia Saturday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 72. Born Evelyn Jean Deibel in Baltimore and raised in Violetville, she was a 1953 Western High School graduate. As a young woman she worked as a control technician at the Emerson Drug Company, manufacturers of Bromo Seltzer. She was also a technician in the blood lab of the Baltimore Rh Typing Laboratory. Mrs. Connor became a research assistant at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and worked with Dr. Curt Richter, Dr. Karl Schellenberg and Dr. Jerry Spivak, among others.
NEWS
January 5, 1995
J. E. Leanos & Co., certified public accountants in West Annapolis, recently hired Lee Walker.Ms. Walker, a resident of Annapolis, has extensive experience in corporate and individual tax return preparation and planning.She received a bachelor of science degree in accounting from Virginia Commonwealth University and has earned the Enrolled Agent designation from the Internal Revenue Service, which permits her to represent taxpayers before the IRS.NAHPC hires specialist for worker aid programNorth Arundel Hospital Professional Center (NAHPC)
NEWS
April 14, 2007
Maravene Mae Hamburger, a retired Johns Hopkins University research assistant, died of heart disease April 5 at her Lutherville home. She was 92. Born Maravene Mae Deveney in York, Pa., she earned a chemistry degree from Goucher College in 1934. When she found no jobs available during the Depression, she enrolled at the Hopkins School of Nursing and received her degree in 1937. She became a visiting nurse and later returned to Hopkins and worked with newborn babies. She became a Hopkins chemistry department research assistant and later worked at McCormick & Co, and Becton, Dickinson labs.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1999
Lydia Owens Gillespie, a debutante and horsewoman who worked for 20 years as a medical research assistant at the Johns Hopkins University, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. She was 82.Born in Metuchen, N.J., she moved to England as a child, then to Baltimore, where her father, the late J. Hamilton Owens, was editor in chief of The Sunpapers from 1943 to 1956.She grew up at the family home in Riderwood, graduated from Roland Park Country School in 1936 and made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon.
NEWS
June 27, 1998
Dorothy Ostrofsky, 76, Hopkins research assistantDorothy Ostrofsky, a retired research assistant at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died yesterday of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 76.From the mid-1960s until the early 1980s, Mrs. Ostrofsky was a research assistant in the hospital's psychology department.A native of Hoboken, N.J., the former Dorothy Kotelchuck married Aaron Ostrofsky in 1941. He died in 1992.Services are scheduled for 11 a.m. tomorrow at Sol Levinson & Bros.
NEWS
By Ralph Clayton | August 1, 2001
THE POWER Plant Live Plaza, a renovated section of Market Place featuring night clubs, bistros and bars, may be a magnet once it opens for entertainment that is expected to attract thousands of visitors nightly to a location several blocks north of the Power Plant. Most Baltimoreans are not aware of the fascinating history of the area once known as Marsh Market Space, or Center Market. Before Baltimore's incorporation as a city in 1797, the property where Market Place now stands was covered by marshland owned by Thomas Harrison.
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