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By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1994
The Carroll County commissioners are considering a tax break next year for businesses doing research and development, at the urging of the Economic Development Commission.Yesterday, the commissioners directed the county attorney's office to draft an ordinance giving businesses a personal property tax credit for equipment and supplies purchased for research and development. The proposal is based on a state law signed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer on May 27, allowing jurisdictions to grant the credit.
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NEWS
July 5, 2013
The Howard County Economic Development Authority is accepting applications for the 2013 Agricultural Innovation Grant, which encourages Howard County's agricultural producers to expand or diversity their business operations. Grants range from $1,000 to $10,000. Money from the grant may be used for research and development, production buildings, major fixtures, processing facilities or to address other agriculture-related business needs. Eligible applicants must be a crop or livestock producer or processor, agricultural cooperative, seafood processor or timber products processor.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
Citing a 45.7 percent increase in research and development expenses, Gaithersburg-based Antex Biologics Inc. reported a net loss of $120,872 for the third quarter that ended Sept. 30, compared with a net loss of $157,551 for the same period of 1996.The small biotechnology company said yesterday that it booked third-quarter revenue of $965,331, compared with revenue of $623,646 for the year-ago quarter.Research and development expenses increased to $801,228 in the third quarter of 1997, from $549,762 in the comparable 1996 quarter.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
While catching up recently with an old friend, Sezin Palmer talked about her work as a program manager in APL's Research and Exploratory Development Department and her previous stint in the Undersea Warfare Department. “I mentioned that I also do modeling,” she says. The friend's face lit up, revealing her excitement at hearing about this sideline career walking a runway, Palmer says, laughing. She explained to the woman that she works with physics and mathematical models that allow exploration of scientific theories, not high fashion.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 28, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer signed into law four bills yesterday that will save research and development companies about $3.75 million in annual sales taxes."
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | May 22, 1991
At the annual shareholders meeting of Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. yesterday, some stockholders wanted to know if the 9-year-old company will ever turn a profit.Nova's response could be paraphrased in three words: Please be patient.The name of Nova's game is research and development. The Baltimore company is working to bring four products at different stages of development to the marketplace. Executives hope to gain Food and Drug Administration approval for all of them by 1994.In the meantime, profits from existing products will continue to be plowed back into testing, according to Nova's vice president of administration, Michael J. Demchuk.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
Human Genome Sciences broke ground yesterday on the $250 million first phase of its new headquarters campus in Rockville. The three-building first phase of the headquarters campus will offer nearly 482,000 square feet, a parking garage and landscaping improvements. One building will be for corporate staff, while two others will be for research and development. Eventually, four additional buildings and one more parking garage may be built. The company said it intends to finance the project with the help of the state and its development agency.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2001
Igen International Inc. of Gaithersburg said it raised $9.5 million yesterday by selling 789,075 shares of common stock to an investment fund that focuses on investments in life sciences companies. The stock purchased by Acqua Wellington North American Equities Fund Ltd. was part of the 3 million shares Igen registered in January to set aside and sell from time to time. Acqua Wellington has an agreement with Igen to buy up to $60 million of the company's shares at a discount. Yesterday's sale was made at about $12.04 a share, a discount of about 10 percent to Igen's closing price.
NEWS
September 1, 1994
David Rakes appointed to HCC boardDavid A. Rakes has been appointed to the board of trustees of Howard Community College by Gov. William Donald Schaefer.Mr. Rakes of Columbia is chief of the program management division of the university center for research and development at the Agency of International Development. A. Scott Carver has joined C.W. Jackson Construction & Development in Jessup as vice president.Mr. Carver has 20 years of experience in estimating and project management as both a contractor and owner representative.
NEWS
By New York Times | July 22, 1991
AS PART of his "America 2000" plan for improving the nation's education system, President Bush proposed a privately funded corporation to help create a "new generation" of schools. That's a worthy idea -- as long as it does not thwart existing experimental efforts to improve schools.Bush has named an 18-member board composed of prominent business, education and political leaders. They hope to raise $200 million in corporate donations for research and development to create 535 new schools by 1996.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
When Gail Folena-Wasserman joined Gaithersburg biotechnology startup MedImmune in 1991, she was its first employee in research and development, and dreamed of what the company might be "when it grew up. " Two decades later, the senior vice president for biopharmaceutical development is helping to test new drugs at a dramatically different MedImmune. Five years since a $15 billion acquisition by British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, the company is funneling a pipeline of potential therapies that has grown three times over and covers a wider spectrum of diseases.
NEWS
By Lori Aratani, The Washington Post | February 1, 2012
Local lore has it that Elizabeth Beall Banks once chased developers off her Gaithersburg-area farm with a shotgun when they came around asking questions. But even then, the sprawl opponent knew that the same forces that turned parcels around her into housing tracts, business parks and shopping centers would eventually threaten the 138-acre Belward Farm. Rather than sell it to the highest bidder, her heirs said, she sold it to the Johns Hopkins University — a suitor she believed would protect the farm from the development she detested.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 21, 2011
Deborah S. Edelman, an author and writer who wrote widely on health issues and established Public Health Media Inc., died Nov. 10 of metastatic breast cancer at her Mount Washington home. She was 51. Dr. Edelman, who kept her maiden name, was born and raised in Garden City, N.Y. After graduating in 1978 from Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, Conn., she earned a bachelor's degree in 1982 in political science from McGill University in Montreal. Dr. Edelman had contemplated a career in law but changed her mind after working as a writer for a medical publisher in New York City for two years, where she covered medical conferences, wrote articles on medical specialties, and was assistant editor of Dermatology News and then editor of Orthopedic News.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
The Maryland Industrial Partnerships Program has approved $4.2 million in high-technology and biotechnology grants to 15 area companies. The money will be used on various projects, including the development of drugs to treat breast cancer , staph infections and malaria. Other projects include the creation of a heated flooring system for chicken houses and a plug-in hybrid car. MIPS gives grants to companies with commercially promising technology and products. The companies join with researchers at Maryland's public universities.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Johns Hopkins plans to use a $10 million gift to launch an institute for patient safety, aiming to reduce medical mistakes that have long troubled health care facilities around the nation. The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality will conduct research and develop methods for use at Hopkins and other hospitals around the globe that could prevent infections, misdiagnoses, improper treatments and other errors. It may be the first of its kind in the country, Hopkins and patient advocates say. "Fewer things are more important in health care right now than improving patient safety and the quality of health care," Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean and chief executive of Johns Hopkins Medicine, said in a statement.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
The article "Fighting to be Made in the USA" (May 20) is another wakeup call for policymakers who want to create jobs for Marylanders. On the one hand, state and local government leaders work to create jobs, on the other, good-paying jobs in manufacturing get exported as we allow our manufacturing base to erode. The future of Maryland manufacturing is in developing next generation manufacturing with customer-focused innovation. Such innovation is directly tied to research and development.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1996
Anne Arundel County became the third Maryland subdivision last night to eliminate property taxes on equipment used for research and development, primarily computer hardware and software.By a 7-0 vote, the County Council approved the legislation that is backed by the Gary administration as a way for Anne Arundel to attract and retain coveted high-tech business.County Executive John G. Gary, a Republican, is expected to sign the bill within days."This establishes us in a leadership position at a modest cost," said Michael S. Lofton, chief executive officer of Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
Two Baltimore-based companies have started work on a $38 million contract to build an advanced chemistry laboratory in Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, said Jeff Hinte, acting director for advanced planning and initiatives of the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center. The center has been the focus of research and development involving the chemical warfare agents in the defense against chemical weapons at the proving ground since World War I. Gaudreau Inc., an architectural firm, and Poole & Kent, a mechanical contractor, are to complete construction in two years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 5, 2010
Lester Marvin Sachs, who retired from the Social Security Administration, died March 28 from dementia at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 82. Dr. Sachs, the son of a carpet salesman and a homemaker, was born and raised in Chicago. He served in the Army as a cook and later a photographer, and attended the Illinois Institute of Technology on the GI Bill, where he earned his bachelor's, master's and doctorate in solid state physics in the early 1950s.
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