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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Jennifer Elisseeff, associate professor at Johns Hopkins University's Translational Tissue Engineering Institute, with Tissue Banks International Nature of research: Elisseeff is developing tiny fibers that combine elements of human tissue with synthetic polymers. She is working with Tissue Banks International, a Baltimore company that is supplying tissue, processing technology and manpower for the research. Stage of research: The project has received a grant from the Maryland Stem Cell Research Commission for up to $600,000 over three years to develop the nanofibers and explore their potential in clinical practice.
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FEATURES
By Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
After 13 years of experience in Maryland real estate, David Orso decided to use his skills to better equip those entering the housing market by writing a book. That this effort would also become a way to pay tribute to his wife was a heartbreaking coincidence. The book, "Step Inside: The Unfiltered Truth About Listing and Selling Your Home," reveals insider advice on finding the best agent, listing and pricing a home, roles of listing agents, and how to go from listed to sold smoothly.
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NEWS
July 28, 2012
I disagree with Timothy Law Snyder's approval of the use of student tuition to fund campus research ("A reminder of what tuition buys," July 26). Undergraduates can spend large amounts of money and incur staggering debt to attend colleges and universities. Their main goal is to get an education and to help prepare them for careers, not to fund research by faculty that they have never even heard of or seen in a classroom. Also, promotion and achieving tenure at most colleges and universities is directly related to research and publishing activities and has nothing to do with teaching ability.
NEWS
By Matthew Bobrowsky | September 26, 2014
Now that Congress is back from its summer recess, members are considering a number of appropriation bills. Priorities are being weighed, and I hope - given our increasingly technological society - scientific research and science education are high on the list. The development of innovations and new products, particularly in medicine and electronics, depends heavily on scientific research. Besides expanding the sum of human knowledge, federally funded scientific research grows our economy and improves the quality of life for all Americans.
NEWS
May 18, 2013
In reference to "Harford County Council passes resolution condemning state gun law" (May 15), the article quotes a Harford County councilman who questioned the objectivity of gun policy research at Johns Hopkins University because New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is a major benefactor. I direct the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research and have been conducting research on gun policy for the past 23 years. Over this time, I have led numerous studies related to gun violence and published the results in 78 articles in scientific journals.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
State health officials are weighing new safeguards for research laboratories and biotechnology companies that handle potentially deadly infectious pathogens, but whether they will impose any remains uncertain because they don't know how big a threat there is. A state panel's report exploring what are known as biocontainment labs found that there is no single federal or state government body that inspects or tracks the facilities to ensure they...
NEWS
December 7, 2013
I was pleased to see that the mayor's office is concerned about Baltimore's climate for investment and economic growth ( "City to study ways to improve Baltimore economic and business climate Dec. 3). I am certain the consultant will have suggestions that are worth $167,500. But I would like to suggest that the mayor meet first with Professor Stephen Walters, a talented economist at Loyola University and the John Hopkins University Institute for Applied Economics. Professor Walters has studied the Baltimore problem and has some excellent ideas.
HEALTH
February 23, 2010
A study requested by the Maryland Technology Development Corp. found that stem cell research in the state supports 514 local jobs with an average salary of $64,000. The economic impact study by Sage Policy Group Inc., released Monday, also said that Maryland's Stem Cell Research Fund helps generate $71.3 million in business sales in the state. The corporation administers the research fund. The analysis also found that Maryland's stem cell industry was able to return nearly $3 million to state and local government through support of income generation, retail activity and property tax payments.
NEWS
February 11, 2012
University professors and scientists who conduct research financed by the taxpayers should have to give up their rights to privacy on matters regarding their work ("Bill would shield academic research," Feb. 5). If they want to keep what they do private, they should work for a privately held company. It seems like a conflict of interest for Del. Samuel I. "Sandy" Rosenberg to sponsor a bill to protect their rights since he is an adjunct professor at two state law schools and therefore has a vested interest in the issue.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
The article "When science is for hire" (Aug 23) raises important issues about consumer protections from hazardous chemicals and the need for better controls on industry-sponsored research. Consumers are the losers when researchers, industry, scientific journals, and in the Eastman Chemical case even the courts, cannot agree on standards of objectivity in assessing public health risks. The story illustrates why government funding of research is still needed and should be increased.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Every day companies mine online data to track consumer habits, but two University of Maryland law professors say Facebook and dating service OkCupid went too far by manipulating their users' experience to study their behavior. At the professors' urging, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler agreed to review this week whether the companies' actions are akin to patients being pulled into medical research without their knowledge. Federal law requires participants' consent and independent oversight of such experiments, and a state law broadened those regulations.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
More than 1,000 people rode bicycles 150 miles - in the rain, for part of the way - this weekend to raise $2.6 million for cancer research at Johns Hopkins. The funds from the inaugural Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, D.C. on Saturday will support the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington and Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. Organizers said the money raised will allow researchers to personalize cancer treatment and screening methods for each patient.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Samuel E. Jackson Jr., a retired research psychologist who was a longtime active member of Kappa Alpha Psi, an historically black fraternity, died Sept. 1 at Howard County General Hospital of heart failure. He was 80. "He was a beacon of light in the community and an elder for young men," said Herb Jenkins, general manager of public sector operations for Xerox Corp. and a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, who said he benefited from Mr. Jackson's generosity of spirit and sense of caring.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Milton Kent, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
At least 15 percent of American men have vasectomies, so when a study came out recently linking this common method of birth control to an increased risk of the most lethal kind of prostate cancer, it sparked some alarm in doctors' offices. The findings "caused a lot of fear among many people, people who had had vasectomies," said Dr. Mohummad Minhaj Siddiqui, one of the study's authors and director of urologic robotic surgery and an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Toshiba data center has moved into the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, collaborating with the medical institution's radiation oncology department to improve treatment of patients with head and neck or lung cancers. The Toshiba Center for Big Data in Healthcare is based in the East Baltimore research park's Rangos Building at 855 N. Wolfe St. The data center will work with Hopkins researchers to use advanced image analysis and data mining to suggest what outcomes patients could expect from treatment plans based on the outcomes of patients with similar anatomy, physiology, pathology and history.
NEWS
By Kristine Beckerle, Deborah Francois and Babur Khwaja | August 28, 2014
Police in Faisalabad, Pakistan's third largest city, tortured more than 1,400 people during a six-year period, according to a report researched and written by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School, for Justice Project Pakistan (JPP), a non-governmental organization based in Lahore, Pakistan. The report, which we authored, documents how law enforcement uses its power to inflict pain largely with impunity. Police beat detainees, hang them by their arms or feet for hours on end, force them to witness the torture of others, and strip them naked and parade them in public.
NEWS
January 10, 2012
This letter is in response to The Sun's editorial on medical marijuana ("Go slow," Jan. 3). Recently, a medical marijuana panel commissioned by the Maryland legislature recommended two divergent proposals. One recommends dispensaries allow doctors to recommend marijuana to patients, and the other allows research institutions to test the efficacy of marijuana on human test subjects. The Sun supports the latter view. I find the support of this viewpoint to be quite frankly absurd. Marijuana has been one of the most researched drugs in the 20th century.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
The article "Fighting to be Made in the USA" (May 20) is another wakeup call for policymakers who want to create jobs for Marylanders. On the one hand, state and local government leaders work to create jobs, on the other, good-paying jobs in manufacturing get exported as we allow our manufacturing base to erode. The future of Maryland manufacturing is in developing next generation manufacturing with customer-focused innovation. Such innovation is directly tied to research and development.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Since Charles Darwin wrote "The Origin of Species" more than 150 years ago, it's been known that nature's selection creates some species and ends others. But researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County suggest that another actor is responsible for driving wedges in animal populations to create new species - mothers themselves. A study published last month in the journal Ecology Letters suggests that female creatures' sexual preferences may launch an evolutionary process that can lead to the creation of new species.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Musicians will sing and strum and play the harmonica Thursday night in Annapolis night to raise funds - and awareness - for Lyme disease. Headlining the Ticked Off Music Fest will be Les Stroud, a TV survivalist and musician from Canada. He'll be joined by two musicians who survived Lyme disease and a lawyer-singer-songwriter from Annapolis. "My hope is to bring awareness to Anne Arundel County about the dangers of tick-borne diseases," said Karen Owen, a fitness instructor and mother from the Broadneck community who is organizing the concert.
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