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BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 13, 2001
CHICAGO - A boom in truck buying in the 1990s helped push the resale value of pickups and sport utility vehicles to lofty levels well above most cars, but market forces are starting to pull them back down. When Paul Taylor, an economist for the National Automobile Dealers Association, tracked the values of the best-selling 1999 vehicles from January 2000 to January 2001, four of the five biggest losers were trucks. The Ford Explorer dropped 20 percent, the Ford Expedition 14.5, Dodge Grand Caravan 14.4 and the Dodge Ram pickup 14. (The car that cracked the top five was the Chevrolet Cavalier, losing 16.5 percent of its value.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
When Stephen Huppaty, owner of OzCorp Fine Builders, moved to Baltimore from Australia in 1997, he was intrigued by an interesting appendage to the miles of brick row houses -- rooftop decks. In the following years, these playpens in the sky would continue popping up in neighborhoods like Fells Point, Federal Hill, Locust Point, Butchers Hill and Canton. To Huppaty, it made perfect sense. In the tight confines of these neighborhoods, owners wishing to put additions on their row homes could either go back (given sufficient room)
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BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 19, 1999
YOU probably didn't notice it last summer. But your personal financial balance sheet as a homeowner would have reflected it: The market resale value of houses across the country rose at the highest quarterly rate this decade during the three months that ended Sept. 30, according to new federal data.In scattered areas, the increases in values -- and presumably in owners' equity -- were astounding. In the District of Columbia, for instance, the third-quarter value gain on the typical single-family house was 5.9 percent, or a 23.9 percent annualized rate.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
You flip the switch and the heat goes on. You make your mortgage payments and your lender is not threatening you. So all's right with the house. Or not. The furnace needs professional maintenance to run efficiently and the mortgage isn't the only payment you need to be on top of. Even in this market, when real estate prices are falling, a home is likely to be the biggest monetary investment their owners make. But homes need TLC so they don't crumble physically or financially. "Fall is the Goldilocks season for home improvement.
BUSINESS
By Remodeling magazine | June 15, 1997
Remodeling kitchens and baths adds the most value to a home.Minor kitchen remodelingReplace cabinet doors, oven and cooktop, laminate counter tops, sink, faucet and floor; repaint.Cost: $8,507Resale value: $8,030Cost recouped: 94 percentBathroom additionAdd a second bath to a house with one or one and a half baths; include ceramic tile and linen closet.Cost: $11,645Resale value: $10,593Cost recouped: 91 percentMajor kitchen remodelingRedesign kitchen, replace all of above, add built-in microwave, custom lighting and island.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | March 2, 2008
An auto insurer might have owed you far more than you got for your last accident claim. If a driver on a cell phone rear-ended your car, for example, his insurer would probably pay for repairs, but did it compensate you for "diminished value"? Diminished resale value is the dollar amount your vehicle inherently loses simply because it has been in a wreck. In other words, when it is time to sell, you probably won't get as much money for it because it is viewed as damaged goods, even if it has been expertly repaired.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | November 21, 1999
IF YOU BELIEVE the numbers, equity-conscious homeowners have just gotten some sobering news: While home values have appreciated by an average 4 percent to 8 percent in many markets around the country this year, the return on investment produced by major remodeling projects reportedly has dropped -- precipitously in some areas.According to the newly published 1999 home real estate "cost vs. value" study -- an influential report conducted by Remodeling magazine and cited by home improvement contractors and realty agents to clients nationwide -- the immediate resale value added by a typical "major kitchen remodel" project has dropped from last year's 87 percent of its cost outlay to 70 percent this year.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH R. HARNEY | April 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- What the federal government calls its most comprehensive survey ever of home price appreciation patterns has turned up some intriguing findings on what's hot, what's not, and where housing values have gained the most over the last decade and a half.What's hot -- at least for the 1990s -- has been residential real estate in Utah, Oregon, Colorado, Wyoming and West Virginia. All five states not only racked up the highest resale price appreciation rates during 1995, but have been near or at the top for the last five years.
BUSINESS
By The Detroit News | January 6, 2007
DETROIT -- Laurel Mathews pampered the Jeep Cherokee she bought barely used from a dealer in 2003 - stringent maintenance, wax-and-polish cleanings, oil changes every 2,000 miles. Given the meticulous care - and the SUV's $15,000-plus price tag - the Upstate New Yorker was more than dismayed when she tried to sell her Jeep two years later. "I couldn't get more than $5,000," she said. "It was in perfect condition. That was my baby. I was horrified." Mathews' experience is shared by many in the nation's car-buying public and has become a big problem for Detroit's automakers.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 21, 1997
WHERE has home-value appreciation been the strongest for the longest stretch of years? Or, put another way, where have home buyers reaped the highest gains on their housing investments?A new national statistical report suggests that the answer depends very much on what period of time you choose to measure your profits. If you're looking at appreciation over the past five years, the answer is unequivocal: Utah. The average home in Utah has gained 74.4 percent in resale value during the past 60 months, according to the study, an appreciation rate more than four times faster than the national average of 17.1 percent since 1992.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | March 2, 2008
An auto insurer might have owed you far more than you got for your last accident claim. If a driver on a cell phone rear-ended your car, for example, his insurer would probably pay for repairs, but did it compensate you for "diminished value"? Diminished resale value is the dollar amount your vehicle inherently loses simply because it has been in a wreck. In other words, when it is time to sell, you probably won't get as much money for it because it is viewed as damaged goods, even if it has been expertly repaired.
BUSINESS
By The Detroit News | January 6, 2007
DETROIT -- Laurel Mathews pampered the Jeep Cherokee she bought barely used from a dealer in 2003 - stringent maintenance, wax-and-polish cleanings, oil changes every 2,000 miles. Given the meticulous care - and the SUV's $15,000-plus price tag - the Upstate New Yorker was more than dismayed when she tried to sell her Jeep two years later. "I couldn't get more than $5,000," she said. "It was in perfect condition. That was my baby. I was horrified." Mathews' experience is shared by many in the nation's car-buying public and has become a big problem for Detroit's automakers.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2005
After nearly six months of difficult negotiations - and two weeks before Opening Day - the Orioles and Major League Baseball were tantalizingly close to an agreement last night that would financially protect the franchise from the competition it faces in its market for the first time in 34 years. Negotiators spent all day yesterday at baseball's Park Avenue headquarters in New York trying to hammer out a deal. Bob DuPuy, MLB's chief operating officer and point man in the talks, said last night that he was optimistic a deal was at hand.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Ed Waldman and Jon Morgan and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2004
The Orioles will be guaranteed at least $130 million a year in revenue and be assured of a price of at least $360 million should the franchise be sold, under an agreement nearing completion between the team and Major League Baseball. Orioles owner Peter Angelos demanded a deal to protect the franchise from any adverse financial consequences after Major League Baseball announced this week that it would move the Montreal Expos to Washington for the 2005 season. The agreement calls for baseball to pay the Orioles in the event their gross revenue falls below a benchmark of about $130 million, millions less than they are expected to earn this year without competition in Washington, but still a valuable safety net. The benchmark is being set by a formula based on attendance.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
ItM-Fs a no-brainer: Counting the upfront costs, monthly payments and depreciation, a new vehicle is more expensive to own than an older, paid-for model. But money isnM-Ft the only factor in deciding when to trade in the old jalopy: Dependability, safety and common sense may trump dollars and cents. Knowing you can reach your destination safely and on time may make a new vehicle a better bet than rolling the dice on a highmileage beater. And even when dependability isnM-Ft an issue, a lot of people just canM-Ft resist the lure of shiny new metal, especially when rebates and low-cost financing add to the attraction.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | September 7, 2003
DEFYING GLOOM-and-doom predictions of impending deflation, the value of the average American home continues to appreciate at more than twice the rate of inflation. In the latest nationwide survey of prices of existing houses, average values rose by 5.6 percent from the second quarter of 2002 through the second quarter of 2003. The study was done by the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO), which monitors the market value changes of millions of individual properties financed or refinanced by giant investors Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. (The OFHEO statistical report, with metropolitan and state market breakdowns, can be viewed at www.ofheo.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | April 13, 1997
THE NAME of the game in home value appreciation, according to a new federal statistical study, isn't simply location, location, location. It's time frame.Depending on the time frame you look at, the top average appreciation rates for American home values have been in Maine (up a torrid 18.6 percent annualized rate in the last quarter of 1996), Michigan (up 9.2 percent for 1996 as a whole), Utah (up 73.6 percent during the past five years), or Massachusetts (up a net 217.3 percent since 1980, despite several years of decline in the late 1980s and early 1990s)
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1996
If season ticket holders for the Carolina Panthers are a presage, those who purchase "personal seat licenses" in Baltimore may reap a financial windfall in the years to come.People in Charlotte, N.C., who purchased seats for their NFL team are seeing a stunning and unexpected explosion in the resale value -- before a single game has been played in the city's new stadium -- and some investment experts and financial planners say the same thing could happen here.In an attempt to raise millions of dollars, the teams in Charlotte and Baltimore are requiring fans to purchase "personal seat licenses."
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | September 9, 2001
WHATEVER the doomsayers may tell you about the weakening economy and the inevitable dire effects on the value of your home, you should know this: The only federal agency that tracks the market values of homes nationwide has just documented a slight - very slight - softening in the rate of appreciation of American housing values. But the annualized rate of appreciation for the average home during the first half of 2001 was still a hefty 7.8 percent. While that's down from the torrid annual rate of 9.5 percent in 2000 - the highest recorded in the past two decades - it's still more than twice the rate of inflation.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 13, 2001
CHICAGO - A boom in truck buying in the 1990s helped push the resale value of pickups and sport utility vehicles to lofty levels well above most cars, but market forces are starting to pull them back down. When Paul Taylor, an economist for the National Automobile Dealers Association, tracked the values of the best-selling 1999 vehicles from January 2000 to January 2001, four of the five biggest losers were trucks. The Ford Explorer dropped 20 percent, the Ford Expedition 14.5, Dodge Grand Caravan 14.4 and the Dodge Ram pickup 14. (The car that cracked the top five was the Chevrolet Cavalier, losing 16.5 percent of its value.
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