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April 27, 1992
In an effort to attract a new, younger audience, Maryland Public Television will break with tradition by airing reruns of a commercial television hit -- "St. Elsewhere" -- on June 1. The show, about a city-run hospital in Boston, ran on NBC from 1982 through 1988, winning several Emmys and a Peabody Award. MPT plans to run the show at 11 p.m., competing with news programs on commercial television and Washington's public Channel 32.The Evening Sun would like your opinion. Should MPT broadcast reruns of commercial programs?
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NEWS
February 6, 2014
The nation's debt ceiling is back in the news this week and for all the old, familiar reasons. By month's end, it will need to be raised or the U.S. Treasury will run out of money to pay the country's outstanding bills, and House Republicans are once again looking to hold the authorizing legislation hostage in return for some sort of concession. What will it be this time? For a while, it looked like they would insist on some changes to Obamacare, specifically, the so-called "risk corridors," a provision of the Affordable Care Act that limits how much insurance companies can profit or lose by selling health insurance policies through exchanges during the first three years.
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FEATURES
By New York Daily News | May 16, 1992
Cathy Guisewite's approximately 1,200 client newspapers received a letter this week explaining why, for eight weeks starting Monday, the daily "Cathy" comic strip will go into reruns.Along with the letter from Universal Press Syndicate, Ms. Guisewite also sent her own letter telling exactly why she needs this break:She's adopting a baby.Actually, saying that didn't take much space. What did take two-thirds of a page was her apology. I'm really sorry to be doing this, she said. It's my own fault, I can't get ahead as I should.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Earlier this year, I wrote about PBS "NewsHour" losing almost half its audience the last eight years and now averaging under a million viewers a night. I attributed that in part to the program not actually reporting news as much as talking to reporters and analysts about news that had already been reported on other outlets. Tuesday night, as I was cycling through the nightly newscasts, I came upon something even I couldn't remember seeing: A last half of the "NewsHour" that consisted of two stories that had already aired somewhere else and one interview segment that I would be generous in describing as an infomercial for PBS. Think about that for a second, two rerun stories -- one of which ran almost three months ago, and an interview that shamelessly promoted another PBS program.
NEWS
By Renee Graham and Renee Graham,BOSTON GLOBE | March 31, 1996
As far as television fans are concerned, the most controversial trend this TV season has nothing to do with the V-chip, truth-bending political advertisements or the proliferation of ridiculous Aaron Spelling dramas.For those who arrange their weeknights around the tube, recent weeks have been unfulfillingly filled with reruns.Where once repeats were consigned to the post-season summer months, they are now just as likely to pop up right in the middle of the television season.So what gives?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 24, 1992
Challenged by state budget cuts and competition from cable programming, public television, which has never successfully marketed itself to younger viewers, is fighting back.In an effort to attract a "new, younger audience," Maryland Public Television will begin airing reruns of "St. Elsewhere" on June 1, station officials announced yesterday.Not only is it rare for a public TV station to air reruns of commercial network shows, but the time slot -- 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday -- will pit "St. Elsewhere" against local late news shows and PBS' "MacNeil/Lehrer News Hour," on Washington's WHMM-TV (Channel 32)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 8, 2004
Big broadcast networks' much-vaunted summer season seems to be leaving audiences cold. Despite a flurry of new programming for the hot-weather months, reruns of regular-season shows are drawing the lion's share of summer viewing. What's the most-watched show this summer? Not one of those new programs, but rather reruns of CBS' regular-season hit CSI. While CSI is drawing about 10 million fewer viewers than during the regular season, with a summer audience of 14.4 million viewers, it's the most-watched series since the regular season ended in May. And it has a lot of company.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
Starting on May 1, nostalgic viewers with a hankering for reruns of All in the Family, Sanford and Son and other stalwarts will be able to tune in to the shows on a digital channel courtesy of WBFF, Channel 45, the station announced yesterday. The Fox affiliate, owned by Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., will carry a separate stream of programming on the digital subchannel, known as 45-2, which will be available via the Comcast, Millennium and Verizon cable TV systems in the Baltimore market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 13, 2003
A Darwinian shake-out is being played out on TV screens these days. For decades, complaining about reruns on television has been a summer ritual. But this year, in the wake of the gold-rush success of programs like Survivor and American Idol, the airwaves have been flooded with original reality programming -- presumably just what the viewers wanted. Apparently not. Thirteen reality programs had premieres during May and June, and not one has cracked the Top 10 list, according to the most recently available A.C. Nielsen Co. ratings (for the week ending July 6)
FEATURES
April 28, 1992
A majority of callers to SUNDIAL has no objection to Maryland Public Television broadcasting reruns of commercial network programs. MPT plans to air NBC's old ''St. Elsewhere'' series nightly at 11 p.m. beginning June 1.Of 292 callers, 156, or 53 percent, said MPT should show the reruns. And 74 percent felt the station should carry programs other than news and public affairs at 11 p.m., the traditional time for late news on the commercial networks."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
In the second quarter of St. Frances' football game Sunday against Friendship Collegiate at Byrd Stadium, the Panthers showed the value of the old adage “If at first you don't succeed, try, try again.” After the Panthers were forced to punt on their first drive of the quarter, Arizona-bound Jonathan Haden caught the ball and took off. As the Panthers brought him down, he lost the ball and Mike Bell recovered for St. Frances. Flags flew and both teams were penalized - the Panthers for a personal foul and the Knights for a block in the back.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 28, 2012
Summertime is usually when TV networks air repeats of shows we've already seen. In his State of the Union Address this week, the president got a five-month jump on the summer season by re-running a class-envy video he has broadcast more times than local stations have shown episodes of "The Andy GriffithShow. " Instead of a credible assessment of the state of the union, which is not good, the president delivered a slightly toned-down campaign speech. We heard more of the same about how "the rich" aren't paying their "fair share" in taxes.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 15, 2011
Thanksgiving may be all about food (and football), but Christmas has myriad elements besides the Roast Beast. Gift presentations and all that oohing and aahing, to be more precise. Growing up, we had a turkey dinner on both Thanksgiving and Christmas. I am not allowed to repeat that tradition. For Dec. 25, "they" want an entirely different menu, and usually something different every year. Serves me right. I created these monsters, albeit adorable ones. My mother used to call it being "hoisted on your own petard.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | November 9, 2009
CINCINNATI -- The same truck that ran over the Ravens in October rumbled through Paul Brown Stadium on Sunday and flattened them again. Same unrelenting pass rush. Same playmaking cornerbacks. Same trademark Bengal stripes. As if to prove the first time was no fluke, the Cincinnati Bengals derailed the Joe Flacco Express for the second time in a month. They turned the Ravens' offense into roadkill and Baltimore's 4-4 season into a mystery novel. "If you look at the tape, they've played well all year," Flacco said after Sunday's 17-7 loss to the Bengals.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 10, 2009
OK, it's not real baseball. That's a couple of weeks away. But for the time being, for that part of us that likes living in the moment, the World Baseball Classic is better than nothing. Better than, say, MASN's endless repeats of classic Orioles games, which serve only to remind us of what we don't have anymore. What a treat last weekend to sit in the family room, windows open, cold beverage close by, and watch somebody play someone else for nine innings - live. To watch Team USA manager Davey Johnson fidget as the Canadian squad chipped away at his team's lead in front of a rabid Toronto crowd.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 5, 2008
Lakers@Celtics 9 p.m. [Chs. 2, 7] This is NBA commissioner David Stern's dream come true. After San Antonio's sweep of Cleveland in an NBA Finals last year that had trouble holding its own in the TV ratings with Law & Order reruns, this renewal of a storied NBA rivalry has a chance to put up some impressive TV numbers.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 12, 1999
Soap opera fans unable to watch ABC dramas during the daytime will soon be able to watch them at night, when Disney and ABC launch a 24-hour soap opera channel.The new venture, scheduled to launch in mid-January, will offer up same-day reruns of "All My Children," "General Hospital," "One Life to Live" and "Port Charles" in prime time and a mix of movies and original fare the rest of the day.The concept is the result of tests ABC conducted last year in Chicago and Houston, during which the daytime series were rerun on a cable channel at night.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 5, 2008
Lakers@Celtics 9 p.m. [Chs. 2, 7] This is NBA commissioner David Stern's dream come true. After San Antonio's sweep of Cleveland in an NBA Finals last year that had trouble holding its own in the TV ratings with Law & Order reruns, this renewal of a storied NBA rivalry has a chance to put up some impressive TV numbers.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 26, 2008
For half a century, fall TV has been a time of new series and original episodes, while summer was thought of as the doldrums of rerun programs. But not this year -- as more networks and channels move to the year-round programming model pioneered by Fox and cable TV. The glitter and streamers have barely been swept away from the stage of American Idol, and a new television season is already under way. And this summer, viewers will be offered some of...
NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Dan Morain and Michael Finnegan and Dan Morain,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2008
Ten donors to Sen. Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign - including Baltimore Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos - offered yesterday to give Michigan $12 million to hold a rerun of its Democratic primary, as Clinton and her rival Sen. Barack Obama traded sharp words over the proposed June 3 contest. With state lawmakers facing a deadline today for approval of the plan, Clinton made a quick stop yesterday in Detroit, where she called on Obama to endorse the do-over election. "Senator Obama speaks passionately on the campaign trail about empowering the American people," she said.
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