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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
The debate over regulating hunting in Howard might not be over, despite passage of a County Council bill revising the rules. The council rejected proposals to require advance notice of hunting and to prohibit shooting toward playgrounds or recreation fields, but those elements could return as new legislation, said Chairwoman Mary Kay Sigaty, sponsor of the amendments. The council also revived and approved a separate bill last week meant to encourage faster construction of below-market priced homes for limited income families.
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NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | September 30, 2014
Following the urban unrest in the 1960s, there was a move toward requiring college degrees for police officers. That movement never gained serious momentum across the nation. Today only a few of the police departments across the country require applicants to possess a college degree, and concerns are still being raised as to whether today's police officers are best prepared to deal with the myriad of situations presented in modern policing. Indeed there are serious questions as to whether a modern democracy can survive without better prepared law enforcement officials able to handle the stresses of the job without overreacting.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and John W. Frece and Timothy B. Wheeler and John W. Frece,Staff Writers | September 2, 1993
Facing an uphill struggle to get "California cars" in Maryland despite a new state law, the Schaefer administration is seeking a federal ruling that would require sale of the low-emission autos and light trucks in every state from Maine to Virginia.The administration last month joined officials from Massachusetts and Maine in asking a regional pollution-control commission to consider action that would, in effect, force all 12 states and the District of Columbia to adopt California's stringent auto emission limits.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Last weekend, Towson students jammed into a parking lot outside Johnny Unitas Stadium, drinking and partying in a pre-game tailgate bash that university officials said left a police officer injured and a girl needing stitches after she attempted a backflip off a pickup truck. None of that was evident Saturday before the Tigers' football game against the Maine Black Bears, after university administrators cracked down on hard-core partying and set new rules for student tailgating.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 1997
The Clinton administration is circulating proposed legislation on Capitol Hill that would, for the first time, impose strict controls on the manufacture and use of technology that scrambles electronic data for privacy reasons.The proposal would prohibit the manufacture, sale, import or distribution within the United States of any such technology unless it contained a feature for immediate decoding of any message by law-enforcement officials with a wiretap order from a court, known as a trapdoor feature.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
All children in Baltimore would be checked for lead poisoning under state legislation recently introduced by city lawmakers, but supporters disagree over when to require it. The bill, put in at the city's behest, would require every child's blood to be screened for the toxic substance upon entering public school. Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden's bill -- and a similar House measure introduced yesterday -- would require the test results be reported to the state health and environment departments.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | January 31, 2007
A bill that would require middle-school girls to get a new vaccine against a sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer is being withdrawn over concerns that children already have a tough time getting all the required immunizations. Sen. Delores G. Kelley, a Baltimore County Democrat, said yesterday that she plans to pull a bill she sponsored that calls for all sixth-grade girls to be vaccinated by September 2008. She said some parents and educators were worried about an added requirement after thousands of students, in grades six through nine, were turned away from school this month for failure to get immunized against chickenpox and hepatitis B, as recently required.
NEWS
By THE LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - Police officers who believe they have reason to stop a person may also require the individual to identify himself, the Supreme Court said yesterday, calling such a requirement a "common-sense inquiry" that is basic to good police work. In a 5-4 decision, the justices rejected the idea that Americans have a constitutional right to remain silent. The decision upholds the laws in Nevada and 20 other states that make it a crime to refuse to identify yourself when asked to do so by the police.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2000
Baltimore's health commissioner urged a City Council committee yesterday to enact a bill requiring all children 1 and 2 years old to be tested for lead poisoning, though the General Assembly adopted a similar statewide law two weeks ago. Dr. Peter Beilenson said that until 2003, the state law does not require a lead-testing registry for children and does not require parents to provide proof of the test when they enroll their children in school. Beilenson said the city legislation, which was introduced Feb. 28 and is expected to be voted on next month, would immediately require the registry and notification.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
Maryland education officials yesterday raised questions about the hiring of substitute teachers, who cost more than $25 million statewide each year -- but do not even need a college degree in most school districts.In a report that provided more questions than answers, the Maryland State Department of Education found wide variations in how the state's 24 school systems hire, pay and classify substitute teachers.For example, no district requires substitutes to be certified teachers, and only four counties -- Allegany, Garrett, Harford and Montgomery -- require them to have bachelors' degrees.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 22, 2014
On Thursday, Australian authorities claimed they thwarted a plot by supporters of the Islamic State to grab random people off the street and then behead the captured citizens on videotape. Australia's attorney general said that the massive raid, the largest counterterrorism operation in the nation's history, involving more than 800 police officers and raids of at least 12 properties, was necessary because, "If the ... police had not acted today, there...
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two City Councilmen plan to submit legislation today requiring every police officer in Baltimore to wear a body camera that records audio and video as the officers go about their jobs. Warren Branch, chairman of the council's public safety committee, and Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's proposal would permit the Baltimore Police Department to phase-in use of the body cameras during the first year after the bill, if approved, becomes law. The bill comes amid a series of high-profile allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore and around the country.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
State officials are hoping a new public health initiative to track the distribution and sale of highly addictive prescription drugs in Maryland can help reduce the number of people who abuse such medications. The initiative, inspired by a program originally developed in Kentucky 15 years ago, has led to a drastic drop in prescription drug abuse there, and it has the potential to become an important element in Maryland's overall effort to reduce overdose deaths from both legal and illegal drugs.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
City officials report that Baltimore police picked up fewer children than expected on the streets late at night after the city's new curfew law went into effect last month. Supporters of the tougher curfew say that suggests parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be indoors at night. But others question whether it's simply a result of police not enforcing the law. While it may be too soon to judge how well the curfew is being enforced, ultimately the success of the new law will depend on families getting the counseling and other services they need to address the problems that led to their kids being out late in the first place.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
President Barack Obama plans to address the nation tomorrow to lay out his strategy for defeating ISIS, the radical Islamist group whose gruesome beheadings and mass killings have terrorized tens of thousands of Iraqi and Syrian civilians in the areas it controls. The actions he is expected to propose will take time to work and require strong American leadership to build the kind of broad-based coalition needed to confront ISIS' battle-hardened militants. But they are also the result of a realistic assessment of the threat, and they can succeed given a sustained commitment to finish the job on the part of the U.S. and its allies.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel, For The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
The top-ranked Severna Park boys were dominant in the 2013 cross country season, capped by a spectacular effort in the Class 4A state championship race at McDaniel College. In that race, the Falcons finished with 38 points, crushing second-place Dulaney (114) and everyone else. Ryan Forsyth won the race as Severna Park placed five runners in the top 14. Forsyth, a star fresh off Anne Arundel and East Regional titles, could have skipped the race and the stacked Falcons still would have won. The best teams often feature dominant runners, but not always.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
A year after Westminster adopted a code regulating property maintenance, city officials are recommending changes - including creating a registry of all residential rental-property owners - to further aid the effort to maintain high property values. In a report to the Common Council last night, Thomas B. Beyard, director of planning and public works, said the property maintenance code has enabled the city to crack down on abandoned vehicles in yards and driveways, high grass and weeds in yards and the run-down facades of buildings.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
The next statewide election in Maryland doesn't arrive for more than two years, but the rush for campaign gold, lustily led by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, is on.And voters who may worry about the influence of money on government policy-making and regulations will have no idea who's giving how much to whom until late in the fall.Maryland's outdated election law requires only one report of contributions received in nonelection years, so only the politician who's raising the money can keep track.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
A proposed amendment to Maryland's constitution that would prevent funding diversions from the state's Transportation Trust Fund has been finalized — ready for voters to decide its fate in November. John P. McDonough, Maryland's secretary of state, certified the language of the proposed amendment last week. It will appear on Nov. 4 ballots as "Question 1. " The so-called "lockbox" amendment was pushed through late in last year's legislative session, and is aimed at preventing the trust fund — bolstered by the state's new gas tax — from being depleted for state needs unrelated to transportation.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Under increasing legal and political pressure, the Obama administration issued a new rule Friday designed to ensure that female employees have access to birth control while accommodating religious employers that object to covering it through their health insurance plans. But the latest attempt at a compromise — which comes in response to recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions — was quickly criticized by religious groups, including the Catonsville-based Little Sisters of the Poor, for not fully addressing their concerns.
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