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January 31, 2013
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NEWS
By Kevin Shird | September 17, 2014
"The Heroin Capital of America" - what an unpleasant way to describe Baltimore. But stay seated, I'll get back to that in a second. I want to talk about something else first, "COAP" which stands for Children of Addicted Parents. For some, it's a difficult term to comprehend, but for many of those labeled with it, it's a life sentence. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, children of addicted parents are more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression and anxiety; they're at a higher risk of becoming alcohol and drug abusers due to both genetic and family environment factors; and they experience greater physical and mental health problems and higher health and welfare costs than do children from non-addicted families.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Rob Mies wants to tackle the image problem bats have head-on. No, they're not going to land on your head and mess up your hair something fierce. No, they're not going to suck your blood and turn into Robert Pattinson (or Bela Lugosi). And yes, they do an awful lot of good. For one thing, they make margaritas possible. "I try to find things that I feel people will be wowed by, that if bats didn't exist, their life would actually change," says Mies, who will be talking about all things bat (and showing off a few of the critters)
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
With the primary a week away, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Douglas F. Gansler has made what his campaign calls his “closing argument” in two new television ads. In one of the ads, Gansler addresses and spins his reputation for bluntness. Neither ad mentions the attorney general's Democratic opponents, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Del. Heather Mizeur. Voters may find that refreshing since Brown's and Gansler's campaigns have been publicly criticizing each other in recent weeks.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
Each week, this newspaper's Crime Log catalogues the criminal acts reported by local police. In most cases, these are thefts - a computer stolen from a house, a lawn mower stolen from a shed, a GPS device stolen from a car. Often, locks are not being used. Thieves recognize that as an opportunity and take advantage. But the biggest opportunity thieves require is simply this: no one watching. Eyeballs on alert are the greatest nemesis of the larcenous. Combine vigilance with a knowledge of the neighborhood - awareness of the comings and goings of those who live nearby - and a powerful crime deterrent emerges.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1999
Shellie Seyer, a Long and Foster real estate agent, had almost closed the deal -- the house in Disney Estates was perfect for the young couple who were expecting their first child. There was only one glitch -- the less than stellar reputation of the local schools.The $225,000 house was in the Meade High School feeder system, a network of 12 schools in the western part of the county that has, over the years, developed a reputation for low academic performance and disruptive students, some of whom live in poverty.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 23, 2000
A Cockeysville real estate investor has filed a $60 million libel suit against The Sun and one of its reporters, alleging that an award-winning series that began last December ruined his reputation and crippled his business. James M. Stein, of the 12000 block of Happy Hollow Road, contends that the articles identifying him as a slumlord and a "silent real estate partner" of a convicted drug dealer were inaccurate and caused "catastrophic financial losses." The suit names Jim Haner, the reporter who wrote the articles, and The Sun as defendants.
NEWS
January 4, 2002
THE TERPS didn't culminate their dream football season with an Orange Bowl victory. But the state -- the Baltimore area in particular -- still has reason to celebrate a collegiate championship. We're talking grids here, not gridiron. And we're talking UMBC, which was recently crowned co-champion of the Pan-Am Intercollegiate Championship. The tournament is regarded as the biggest collegiate chess competition in the Western Hemisphere. UMBC has dominated the competition over a six-year period as no other university team has -- not Harvard, Yale or Columbia.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | October 17, 1993
TORONTO -- Even though no out was recorded, last night's key play in Game 1 was one of two defensive gems turned in by Toronto Blue Jays second baseman Roberto Alomar. And it undoubtedly was the Philadelphia Phillies' scouting report that kept them from taking the lead on the play.It came in the sixth inning, with the score tied at 4 and the Phillies threatening to break the game open. Al Leiter had replaced erratic starter Juan Guzman and faced Mariano Duncan with runners on first and second and two out.Duncan lined a sharp bouncer up the middle on which Alomar made a sensational diving stop, preventing the ball from going into center field.
SPORTS
By Bob Glauber and Bob Glauber,NEWSDAY | July 11, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - It is a few minutes after practice, and Terrell Owens is sitting on a black leather couch, telling a visitor why he thinks it's too late to change his image as one of the NFL's most controversial players. Speaking barely above a whisper, he seems nothing like the trash-talker he was labeled during his days with the San Francisco 49ers. Now with the Philadelphia Eagles after rejecting an offseason trade to the Ravens, he leans back on the couch in an office at their training complex and shakes his head.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
At first, Megan Douty ignored the call from the strange number lighting up her cellphone during class in College Park a few weeks ago. When the number showed up again, she had left class, so she answered. The news stopped her in her tracks. The call came from a Tewaaraton Foundation official congratulating the Maryland defender on being named a Tewaaraton Award finalist. Walking across campus, Douty froze as the words hit her: "Tewaaraton finalist. " She, a defender, was one of the top five players in all of women's college lacrosse this spring.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
By a strike to the jaw or by a submission on the ground, in 25 seconds or 25 minutes, Jon "Bones" Jones was going to win Saturday night. That was the consensus reached as UFC 172 neared, and it was not an unfair one. He is the best pound-for-pound fighter in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, and the allure of his fights, for as one-sided and almost unfair as they are, now seems to be in what he will say before or after them. His results have otherwise spoken for themselves. That was the case last week, when UFC's poster boy, fighting out of Endicott, N.Y., spoke of having a hometown advantage in his light-heavyweight title bout against Glover Teixeira inside Baltimore Arena.
NEWS
By Mark Nuckols | February 6, 2014
During the past seven years, Russia has spent over $50 billion to produce what President Vladimir Putin promises will be the best winter Olympics ever. It has been estimated that as much as half or more of this money has been stolen or wasted. Also overshadowing the games, which kick off Friday in Sochi with the opening ceremony, have been various credible threats of terrorist attacks. For these and other reasons, Sochi may turn out to be a national humiliation for Russia and a political disaster for Mr. Putin himself.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 21, 2014
One of the best and most enduring aspects of presidential cabinets has been the willingness of many chief executives to appoint at least one member from the opposition party. The practice demonstrates bipartisanship and also gives the president access to views that may not always be offered by loyalist appointees. The custom of reaching across the party aisle has been brought into question by the new memoir of former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, kept in the job by President Obama as a carryover from the George W. Bush presidency.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Most of the time, the opening tip in a basketball game is a simple formality. But Oakland Mills junior forward Mamadou Ndiaye can make it a spectacle. Opposite Hammond's big man at a recent home game, Ndiaye - a sleek 6 feet, 7 inches and 195 pounds - easily gets a foot higher to reach the ball at its highest point. He sends the tap back with such force, however, the ball goes over a teammate and out of bounds on the baseline. The seamless effort is an immediate testament to Ndiaye's natural athletic gifts.
NEWS
By Megan Brockett, For The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Amid a red-brick sea of commercial offices, chain businesses and small eateries, a new seasonal shop has popped up in the main-street area of Dundalk, featuring work by local artisans, photographers and other vendors. The Holiday Gallery and Gifts Pop-Up Shop opened Oct. 11 in the Dundalk Village shopping center as a kind of community revitalization effort, birthed through a partnership among Blue Ocean Realty, the Dundalk Renaissance Corp. and a group of area crafters led by local business owner Laura Quintana.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
CLEVELAND -- There was a hyper-extended left elbow that put him on the disabled list in June and out of the All-Star Game at Jacobs Field. There is a partially torn tendon in his left knee that will require surgery after the season is over. There is a jammed shoulder hurt diving back on a pickoff play in Game 2 of the American League Championship Series.Things are back to normal for David Justice.Except for this: Justice is still playing.A reputation for not always playing hurt during his eight years with the Atlanta Braves has been overcome during his first season with the Cleveland Indians, largely due to the luxury of being used as a designated hitter.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Scott Nicholson wasn't surprised that his friends hadn't heard of the college he had chosen to attend, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. After all, he hadn't either until deep into his college search. "They didn't even know what I was talking about. They said, `University of Maryland, basketball, awesome!'" said the junior from Los Angeles, recalling how his friends confused UMBC with the state's flagship campus at College Park. "But now, that's changing a little bit." And how. These days, the school with the ungainly initials attracts widespread notice that eluded it for decades.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | August 27, 2013
The thing about reputations, good or bad, is they often aren't all that accurate. From a reputation perspective in Harford County, Edgewood High and Fallston High are on opposite ends of a spectrum. In reality, they're both fine schools with high-achieving students, and they both have their problems. It, therefore, comes as no particular surprise that a gathering of Edgewood High students and graduates would spend some of the precious few days of summer vacation assembling a mural at the school.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 14, 2013
A smart, progressive event gets under way in Frederick County in about a week - a farm-to-fork promotion in 13 restaurants there. Starting Aug. 23, the participating establishments will offer home-grown food and wine; they'll buy enough products from county farmers and vintners to make their menus 60 percent local. That's an oh-so-trendy concept and at the same time old-fashioned, a throwback to the days when chefs bought their meats and produce out the back door. Farm-to-Fork Frederick gets chefs acquainted with local farmers, and it challenges locavores to put their money where their mouths have been - demanding regionalization of the food supply.
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