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NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- It is becoming increasingly clear that special prosecutor Kenneth Starr is following a strategy likely to cause awkward problems for Republican leaders in Congress, as well as for President Clinton.The list of witnesses Mr. Starr has put before the grand jury here most recently telegraphs his approach to the whole Monica Lewinsky episode. They include Linda Tripp, who made all those recordings of Ms. Lewinsky talking about Mr. Clinton, and a whole list of people in the White House who might have seen something going on between the president and the young intern: Clinton secretary Betty Currie, stewards who work in the pantry adjacent to the Oval Office, Secret Service agents.
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NEWS
By Barack Obama | March 29, 2014
As Americans, we believe that honest work should be rewarded with honest wages. That certainly means that no one who works full-time should ever have to raise a family in poverty. In the coming weeks, your senators will have a chance to stand up for that principle by voting yes or no on a bill to raise the minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour. It's important to remember that most workers who would get a raise when Congress passes this bill aren't teenagers taking on their first job. They average 35 years old. A majority of lower-wage jobs are held by women.
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NEWS
April 26, 1997
UNITED NATIONS Secretary-General Kofi Annan's plan to reduce his secretariat's staffing by 1,000 from 10,000, trim $123 million from a two-year budget and merge three economic development agencies into one, sounds like what Republicans in Congress demand.But they aren't so sure. They want real paring and not just accounting games. Skeptical reactions from rank and file are a holding pattern while the congressional leadership negotiates with the administration.It is becoming clear that President Clinton's second-term diplomatic team consists of ambassadors to Congress.
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | October 10, 2013
The United States is currently in the midst of a leverage crisis, only it is a crisis that stems from political institutions rather than economic ones. The political leverage crisis concerns Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court, and it is animated by the excessive leveraging tactics of the House Republicans, especially the extremist faction of the House Republican caucus. "Leverage" is a concept borrowed from ancient physics referring to the property of a lever and fulcrum to create maximum force with minimum effort.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
DRAFT DODGER, patriot; Bill Clinton, Bob Dole.Match them up; and be mindful -- this is an environmental column.This train of thought proceeds from a recent talk by Wayne Gilchrest, the Republican and environmentalist who represents me in Congress.It was the weakest performance I've heard Rep. Gilchrest give. Maybe the problem was the topic set forth by Salisbury State University: "Conservatism and Environmentalism -- The Apparent Conflict."Until recently there's been no fundamental conflict.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Saying that Republicans in Congress were treating the projected federal budget surplus "as if they'd won it in the lottery," President Clinton defended yesterday his promise to veto the main tax cuts passed by the House and Senate and called for bipartisan cooperation in setting the nation's fiscal priorities. In his weekly radio address, taped in Japan - where he is meeting with the leaders of the big industrial nations - Clinton said Republicans were rushing toward spending all the projected surplus on tax cuts that would go primarily to the wealthy.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
When I attended the College Park campus of the University of Maryland from 1968 to1972, it was the height of the Vietnam War.As a Republican and supporter of Richard Nixon, I sometimes felt very lonely when we discussed politics. often. In fact, it was Nixon's strong stance in foreign affairs that attracted me to the Republican Party in the first place, along with the near-isolationist philosophy of the Democrats.Given that, you can imagine the slow burn I've been doing the past two months as many Republicans in Congress are starting to sound like George McGovern over the war in the Balkans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 1995
President Clinton has emerged from the federal budget standoff with his highest public ratings in nearly two years, while House Republicans, particularly Speaker Newt Gingrich, have lost much of the goodwill they enjoyed after their sweep of Congress last year, the latest New York Times/CBS News Poll shows.Virtually every finding showed striking evidence of renewed political strength for the president: Mr. Clinton's job approval level has broken 50 percent for the first time in the Times' polling since February 1994.
NEWS
August 26, 2000
IN A TIME of unprecedented prosperity, shouldn't this nation's lowest-paid workers get a slightly bigger sliver of the financial pie? Republicans in Congress are doing their utmost to delay that from happening. They have tied a bill raising the minimum wage to a tax-cut plan they know President Clinton will veto. That's cynical, uncaring, political game-playing. If the GOP and presidential candidate George W. Bush want to position themselves as friends of the American worker, they had better get serious about raising the minimum wage when Congress returns next month.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS MACKINNON | April 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A number of Republicans, including me, lately have been asking ourselves: What has become of our party and why has it lost its moral and ideological compass? A more telling question and statement may have been made by my South American wife with regard to certain Republican members of Congress who support guest-worker legislation for millions of illegal aliens. As a newly minted and very proud U.S. citizen, she said, "What's wrong with those people? They are spitting in my face and the face of every immigrant who came into this country legally, paid our dues, did all of our paperwork and played by the rules.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 4, 2012
Ayatollahs seem to just appoint themselves and then start enforcing their own brand of orthodoxy. Grover Norquist has been doing that in the Republican Party for years. Mr. Norquist has never been elected to anything. Nobody ever said he should be in charge of the GOP's true religion (although he claims President Ronald Reagan urged him to found his lobbying group, Americans for Tax Reform). But he certainly has been the Republicans' key political theologian who made opposition to tax increases the party's central tenet for more than 25 years.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
I was sorry, but not surprised, to hear that the Republican/tea party is content to see the airline industry benefit from uncollected taxes while ignoring the needs of union members, construction and support workers and the flying public ("In other congressional idiocy…" Aug. 3). While these workers are on furlough due to the inaction of Congress, I hope they will make sure they are registered to vote so that they can help these members see what it is like to be laid off. Alma T., Baltimore
NEWS
December 27, 2007
`Stop Snitching 2' sends wrong signals Thanks to The Sun for publishing the enlightening, if disturbing, article on Stop Snitching impresario Rodney Bethea ("Thug life - the sequel," Dec. 23), who is photographed in front of an abandoned, boarded-up rowhouse that symbolizes the promise of his empire - Baltimore as a dilapidated ghost town. Unfortunately, I have yet to find an acceptable rationale for Mr. Bethea's actions. Although he promotes the stop snitching, pro-dealing ethic because, he says, "People are surviving the only way they know how," he fails to add the appropriate note that they are doing so by killing their brothers and sisters and their community.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
WASHINGTON --Sen. John W. Warner and his wife were at the White House for a Memorial Day photo session with veterans when they received an unexpected invitation from President Bush. "Come on," the president said suddenly. "Let's go back to the Oval Office." What followed, said Warner, a Virginia Republican and chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, was a rare 15 minutes alone with the president, no aides or staff in sight. Bush escorted the couple to a private garden and solicited the senator's views on Iraq.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS MACKINNON | April 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A number of Republicans, including me, lately have been asking ourselves: What has become of our party and why has it lost its moral and ideological compass? A more telling question and statement may have been made by my South American wife with regard to certain Republican members of Congress who support guest-worker legislation for millions of illegal aliens. As a newly minted and very proud U.S. citizen, she said, "What's wrong with those people? They are spitting in my face and the face of every immigrant who came into this country legally, paid our dues, did all of our paperwork and played by the rules.
NEWS
By JEFF ZELENY | March 12, 2006
MEMPHIS -- The race for the White House, an unusually long and crowded one, unofficially started here yesterday as a flock of Republicans began auditioning before influential party activists who will help choose the successor to President Bush. With home-field advantage, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist placed first in an informal poll of 2008 presidential hopefuls at a Republican conference. The two-term Tennessee senator received 526 first-place votes, or 36.9 percent, at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference's "straw poll" sponsored by Hotline, a political digest.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
WASHINGTON --Sen. John W. Warner and his wife were at the White House for a Memorial Day photo session with veterans when they received an unexpected invitation from President Bush. "Come on," the president said suddenly. "Let's go back to the Oval Office." What followed, said Warner, a Virginia Republican and chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, was a rare 15 minutes alone with the president, no aides or staff in sight. Bush escorted the couple to a private garden and solicited the senator's views on Iraq.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- David Wilhelm, the 36-year-old Chicagoan who was Bill Clinton's campaign manager last year and is now chairman of the Democratic National Committee, says that after six months on the job, he has learned something about the Republicans in Congress: They play hardball.That this should have come as any surprise to a man who saw his candidate pilloried with GOP attacks on his character last fall is a surprise in itself. One of the hallmarks of the Clinton campaign was its mastery of hitting back when hit, with a special "rapid response" unit in Little Rock that fielded Republican barbs on the short hop and fired back within a news cycle.
NEWS
October 12, 2005
Along the Gulf Coast, many evacuees hit by Katrina and Rita are still living in shelters, waiting for the temporary housing that President Bush promised by Saturday. Despite Mr. Bush's continued displays of concern - including a nationally televised moment this week helping volunteers build a home for a Louisiana family displaced by Katrina - there is still an enormous disconnect between what's needed in the storm-devastated Gulf areas and what's happening in Washington, where Republicans in Congress want to ax programs for low-income people while fiercely guarding tax cuts for the rich.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Warren Vieth and Janet Hook and Warren Vieth,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Republicans in Congress started searching yesterday for ways to achieve President Bush's overall deficit-reduction targets without slaying such political sacred cows as farm subsidies, Amtrak and aid to states. Many of the proposals in Bush's $2.57 trillion spending plan drew fire not only from Democrats but from members of his party who are reluctant to cut programs because they - unlike Bush - will face re-election in 2006 and beyond. Concern about persistent budget deficits, as well as resistance to deep spending cuts, could make it harder for Bush to achieve other domestic priorities, such as making his 2001 and 2003 tax cuts permanent.
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