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NEWS
March 7, 1996
After flirting with Buchanan bigotries and Forbes fantasies, Republican voters have come to their senses by rallying to Sen. Bob Dole. With his pivotal victory in South Carolina last Saturday and his stunning sweep of eight "Junior Tuesday" primaries yesterday, including Maryland's, the Senate majority leader has reclaimed his position as the presumptive GOP candidate for president.Although also-rans Lamar Alexander and Dick Lugar prudently withdrew from the race, TV commentator Pat Buchanan and publisher Steve Forbes remain problems for Senator Dole and his party.
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NEWS
January 25, 2012
To deny that Newt Gingrich's comments on food stamps weren't implicitly racist is breathtakingly naive ("Newt the demagogue," Jan. 20). Of course that's what Mr. Gingrich was up to in South Carolina, tossing red meat to the Republican voters. Right on to The Sun for pointing out the obvious. Charles Rammelkamp, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 8, 1996
TAPPAHANNOCK, Va. -- Rosamond Lilly has a "Vote for Jim Miller" sticker on her car and another on her purse. But her goal in Tuesday's Republican primary is less to elect James C. Miller than to defeat Sen. John W. Warner."
NEWS
December 7, 2011
I find Steven P. Grossman's commentary amusing ("GOP presidential field outdoes itself," Nov. 6). Mr. Grossman takes great delight in mocking the field of Republican presidential nominees. That's not the amusing part. The fun part is looking at the field of candidates the Democrats had in 2008, and how they whittled that field down, how they made the decisions on who to kick off the island, versus how the GOP voters are making their decision in 2012. In 2008, the Democrats could have chosen John Edwards, a man with a woman problem.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Edward Lee, Jill Hudson Neal, Erika D. Peterman, Jamal E. Watson and Nancy A. Youssef contributed to this article | September 16, 1998
Howard Republican voters made their party's choice for county executive yesterday between two councilmen who are conflicting symbols of the once-rural suburban county -- a 65-year-old native who grew up on a West Friendship farm and a 45-year-old hospital executive who moved to Columbia during the boom of the 1980s.The winner of the primary between Charles C. Feaga and Dennis R. Schrader will face Democrat James N. Robey, the former police chief, in a November election to decide who succeeds Republican Charles I. Ecker in the county's highest office.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
To deny that Newt Gingrich's comments on food stamps weren't implicitly racist is breathtakingly naive ("Newt the demagogue," Jan. 20). Of course that's what Mr. Gingrich was up to in South Carolina, tossing red meat to the Republican voters. Right on to The Sun for pointing out the obvious. Charles Rammelkamp, Baltimore
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
Baltimore Democrats outnumber Republican voters 9 to 1, odds that traditionally make the winner of the GOP September primary political road kill in November.The last Republican to be elected Baltimore mayor was Theodore R. McKeldin, 36 years ago.Amid the city's 17-candidate Democratic primary brawl, the city's six Republican hopefuls are struggling to have their campaigns heard.Republican mayoral candidate David F. Tufaro has the support of party leaders in his bid to capture the majority of the 30,000 Republican voters.
NEWS
December 7, 2011
I find Steven P. Grossman's commentary amusing ("GOP presidential field outdoes itself," Nov. 6). Mr. Grossman takes great delight in mocking the field of Republican presidential nominees. That's not the amusing part. The fun part is looking at the field of candidates the Democrats had in 2008, and how they whittled that field down, how they made the decisions on who to kick off the island, versus how the GOP voters are making their decision in 2012. In 2008, the Democrats could have chosen John Edwards, a man with a woman problem.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
It was an intriguing strategy for Anne Arundel County's dwindling Democratic Party: Recruit the second most visible Republican in this increasingly conservative county to run as a Democrat against the Republican county executive.The theory was that the Democrats might be able to sneak back to the top of the political hill by using a Republican to steal Republican voters and a Democratic label to lock in the Democratic voters.It didn't work. Democratic voters in Tuesday's primary saw the party's recruit, Diane R. Evans, as an elephant in sheep's clothing -- a Republican trying to fool them -- and chose Janet S. Owens as their nominee, according to local political observers.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | June 11, 2007
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Vultures are circling John McCain's campaign bus. The candidate formerly known as America's most admired politician is in serious trouble in the presidential contest, his detractors say. The problem: He's "too old, too Washington and too Iraq war," as one ex-supporter put it. McCain, 70, is no longer the Republican front-runner, but the whispers out of rival camps that his candidacy is on the verge of collapsing seem premature....
NEWS
September 13, 2010
The question that consumed Maryland's Republican state senators during the last four years was whether they should seek to confront the Democratic governor and majority in the legislature at every opportunity or whether they should look for ways they could work with the other party without compromising their beliefs. Two devotees of the confrontational school — Sens. Andy Harris and Janet Greenip — have either left or are leaving the legislature, and voters in their districts have the opportunity to replace them with candidates who are solidly conservative but dedicated to building the kinds of relationships that will help them get more done for their constituents.
NEWS
August 7, 2007
We're not about to give bounced radio-show host Don Imus credit for helping point the nation's moral compass in the right direction. But his precipitous free fall from the airwaves has sparked criticism of the rap industry over the racist and sexual nature of lyrics. And now, some rappers are cleaning those filthy mouths. The platinum-seller Chamillionaire recently announced that his new album would be cuss- and "N-word" free. He joins other lesser-known artists who are promoting music that strays away from gangsta rap. Their change of heart may have as much to do with rap sales plunging 33 percent from 2006.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Reporter | June 11, 2007
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Vultures are circling John McCain's campaign bus. The candidate formerly known as America's most admired politician is in serious trouble in the presidential contest, his detractors say. The problem: He's "too old, too Washington and too Iraq war," as one ex-supporter put it. McCain, 70, is no longer the Republican front-runner, but the whispers out of rival camps that his candidacy is on the verge of collapsing seem premature....
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | May 29, 2007
STAMFORD, Conn. -- All right," Fred Thompson told a Connecticut Republican audience. "Let's get the announcement out of the way." After a dramatic pause, the would-be presidential candidate declared: "Law & Order will return for an 18th season."
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | October 26, 2006
Media pundits have just about given this year's election to the Democrats - at least in the House of Representatives and perhaps in the Senate as well. They might even be right, for a change. Some are saying that this could be like the 1994 midterm election shocker, when the Republicans seized control of the House of Representatives for the first time in 40 years. If so, the Democrats will win by following the exact opposite strategy from that which brought the congressional Republicans to power in 1994.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2006
Republican candidate Greg Fox has the numbers on his side in Howard County's Council District 5, where registered Republican voters outnumber Democratic voters by more than 4,000. But that hasn't stopped him from waving at motorists during the morning rush hour or knocking on doors on weekends "I don't feel I can take anything in this world for granted," he said. Democratic candidate Don Dunn isn't trusting the numbers either, pointing to his years of community advocacy and activities as a way to attract senior citizens, families of young athletes, farmers, golfers and fellow beekeepers, regardless of party affiliation.
NEWS
August 7, 2007
We're not about to give bounced radio-show host Don Imus credit for helping point the nation's moral compass in the right direction. But his precipitous free fall from the airwaves has sparked criticism of the rap industry over the racist and sexual nature of lyrics. And now, some rappers are cleaning those filthy mouths. The platinum-seller Chamillionaire recently announced that his new album would be cuss- and "N-word" free. He joins other lesser-known artists who are promoting music that strays away from gangsta rap. Their change of heart may have as much to do with rap sales plunging 33 percent from 2006.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2006
Republican candidate Greg Fox has the numbers on his side in Howard County's Council District 5, where registered Republican voters outnumber Democratic voters by more than 4,000. But that hasn't stopped him from waving at motorists during the morning rush hour or knocking on doors on weekends "I don't feel I can take anything in this world for granted," he said. Democratic candidate Don Dunn isn't trusting the numbers either, pointing to his years of community advocacy and activities as a way to attract senior citizens, families of young athletes, farmers, golfers and fellow beekeepers, regardless of party affiliation.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 1, 2000
WASHINGTON -- George W. Bush regained his footing yesterday in his drive for the White House, claiming solid victories over his chief rival, John McCain, in Virginia and the two other states that held Republican contests yesterday. Bush won all 56 delegates from Virginia, all 12 in Washington state, and 14 of 19 selected in North Dakota caucuses, restoring the luster to his presidential bid as the candidates head into the all-important "Super Tuesday" next week. On that day, 13 states, including California, New York and Maryland, will hold Republican primaries.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 13, 2000
WHAT IS IT about John McCain that has sparked such intense interest in his long-shot presidential campaign? Were used to maverick insurgencies on the Democratic left (Henry Wallace and Eugene McCarthy being the most familiar and Bill Bradley being the latest). But staid conservative Republicans going ga-ga over a candidate who wants to tear down the very establishment the GOP represents? The Arizona senator's convincing victory in the New Hampshire primary has energized discontented Republicans.
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