Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRepublican Rep
IN THE NEWS

Republican Rep

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | February 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Members of Maryland's congressional delegation said yesterday that they have avoided the kinds of problems that torpedoed the nominations of Zoe Baird and Judge Kimba M. Wood for attorney general by always paying Social Security taxes and never hiring illegal aliens.A survey of the state's eight representatives and two senators found none who reported violating the laws regarding the employment of undocumented workers and payment of taxes for household workers. Most answered through their press secretaries or other aides.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By James Oliphant and Janet Hook and James Oliphant and Janet Hook,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 28, 2009
WASHINGTON - Trying to build support for his $825 billion economic stimulus plan before a crucial vote, President Barack Obama traveled to Capitol Hill yesterday but continued to meet a stubborn wall of complaints from Republicans that the cost of the package is unacceptable. While Republicans praised Obama for listening to their concerns, many said afterward that they will not support the proposal. With the House set to vote on the proposal today, there seemed little chance that the Republicans, who hold almost no power in the chamber, could have a material impact on the package before it heads to the Senate.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 23, 1995
Although Michael Dingman has saved millions of dollars in U.S. taxes by renouncing his U.S. citizenship and moving to the Bahamas, he has given up one right:He no longer can contribute to American political campaigns.Which may not break his heart.Dingman, a "yacht person," who reaps great financial benefit by spurning the country of his birth, is the chairman and CEO of TTC Abex Inc., an aerospace company in New Hampshire.And, in the past, Abex has been generous to American politicians.In 1992, something called the Abex Inc. Employees for Sensible Government contributed $5,000 each to the successful campaigns of Republican U.S. Sen. Judd Gregg, Republican U.S. Rep. Bill Zeliff, and Democratic U.S. Rep. Dick Swett.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
WASHINGTON-- --No matter who shows up at this week's Republican presidential debate in Baltimore, it's a good bet the biggest applause will go to the most conservative man onstage. He's Rep. Ron Paul, a perfect protest candidate for 2008. Trained as a physician, he's "Dr. Paul" to a small but growing base of fervent admirers - more than a few of whom could fairly be called zealots. Around the Capitol, the Texas congressman is "Dr. No," for his frequent, and often lonely, insistence on opposing any legislation that, in his view, exceeds the authority explicitly given to Congress by the framers of the Constitution.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and Janet Hook and James Oliphant and Janet Hook,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 28, 2009
WASHINGTON - Trying to build support for his $825 billion economic stimulus plan before a crucial vote, President Barack Obama traveled to Capitol Hill yesterday but continued to meet a stubborn wall of complaints from Republicans that the cost of the package is unacceptable. While Republicans praised Obama for listening to their concerns, many said afterward that they will not support the proposal. With the House set to vote on the proposal today, there seemed little chance that the Republicans, who hold almost no power in the chamber, could have a material impact on the package before it heads to the Senate.
NEWS
September 13, 2002
ALL THOSE Marylanders who were too busy, too bored or too disaffected to vote in Tuesday's primaries -- about two-thirds of those registered -- might want to make a bigger effort for the November general election. The state will likely play a key role in determining whether Republicans retain control of the House of Representatives, an outcome that could in turn have a great impact on the Bush presidency. Two Maryland seats currently held by the GOP are under serious threat from Democrats.
NEWS
October 23, 1998
SERIOUS threats to members of Congress up for re-electio are few and far between nationally. The Maryland delegation is no exception. A strong economy -- good for incumbents -- and the huge sums of money required to mount an effective campaign have dampened challenges this election. Here are our endorsements for districts in the Baltimore area and beyond:Gilchrest for the 1stRep. Wayne T. Gilchrest has been a pragmatic lawmaker who does a good job representing the interests of his district and Maryland.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer Staff writers William Thompson, Michael Hill, Frank Langfitt, Tom Keyser and Peter Hermann contributed to this article | November 4, 1992
Republican Wayne T. Gilchrest overcame negative ads, the state's political establishment and a high-powered money machine to defeat Democrat Tom McMillen last night in the bitterly fought race to represent Maryland's sprawling 1st Congressional District.It was one of just five contests nationally in which two incumbents were vying for a single seat.Meanwhile, Republican candidate Roscoe Bartlett defied conventional political wisdom by defeating Democrat Thomas H. Hattery, a state delegate, in the hard-hitting battle to succeed Beverly B. Byron in Western Maryland's 6th Congressional District.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- A year to the day after the Supreme Court settled the presidential election of 2000 and created a partisan firestorm in the country, Democratic and Republican congressmen alike dutifully trudged to the microphone on the House floor on Wednesday and accepted the possible. Often in precisely the same words, they reminded each other not to "let the perfect be the enemy of the good" by voting against the bipartisan election reform bill before them that was "less than perfect."
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | February 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The people of Maryland spoke yesterday -- but not all of them got through.Congressional offices in Washington and throughout Maryland reported a surge of calls as citizens voted with their phones and gave President Clinton's economic proposals at least a mild thumbs up.Many of the callers who did get through said they were willing to suffer through tax increases if it would help cut the deficit.That marked a sharp change from the trend earlier this week, when calls ran heavily against the plan Mr. Clinton discussed Monday night.
NEWS
By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON | May 26, 2006
The instant the news broke that FBI agents raided the office of black Louisiana Rep. William J. Jefferson and announced that they had a videotape of him allegedly stuffing bribe money into a freezer, some blacks loudly grumbled that the Democrat was the victim of a racial double standard. They noted that the FBI did not ransack the offices of Ohio Republican Rep. Bob Ney, also under legal fire, or California Republican Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, who resigned after pleading guilty to fraud, conspiracy to commit bribery and tax evasion.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - In a rare and unexpected setback for Republican leaders, the House of Representatives soundly rejected a $602 billion spending package yesterday for education, health care and other social programs. The unusual defeat of a major spending measure-the result of unanimous Democratic opposition and the defection of 22 Republicans - caught both parties off guard, left Democrats ebullient over their victory and added tomounting Republican problems in Congress. The votewas 224-209 against the measure.
NEWS
September 13, 2002
ALL THOSE Marylanders who were too busy, too bored or too disaffected to vote in Tuesday's primaries -- about two-thirds of those registered -- might want to make a bigger effort for the November general election. The state will likely play a key role in determining whether Republicans retain control of the House of Representatives, an outcome that could in turn have a great impact on the Bush presidency. Two Maryland seats currently held by the GOP are under serious threat from Democrats.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- A year to the day after the Supreme Court settled the presidential election of 2000 and created a partisan firestorm in the country, Democratic and Republican congressmen alike dutifully trudged to the microphone on the House floor on Wednesday and accepted the possible. Often in precisely the same words, they reminded each other not to "let the perfect be the enemy of the good" by voting against the bipartisan election reform bill before them that was "less than perfect."
NEWS
October 23, 1998
SERIOUS threats to members of Congress up for re-electio are few and far between nationally. The Maryland delegation is no exception. A strong economy -- good for incumbents -- and the huge sums of money required to mount an effective campaign have dampened challenges this election. Here are our endorsements for districts in the Baltimore area and beyond:Gilchrest for the 1stRep. Wayne T. Gilchrest has been a pragmatic lawmaker who does a good job representing the interests of his district and Maryland.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The sudden demise of Paula Corbin Jones' sexual misconduct suit has dramatically shifted the terrain on Capitol Hill, making Republican talk of impeachment all the more politically toxic.Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr made it clear yesterday he will proceed vigorously with his investigation of criminal allegations against the president, despite the fact that those allegations arise from a civil lawsuit that, for the moment, no longer exists.And Republicans in the House and Senate gamely insist the Jones ruling will have no impact on their decision on whether to proceed with an inquiry of impeachment.
NEWS
By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON | May 26, 2006
The instant the news broke that FBI agents raided the office of black Louisiana Rep. William J. Jefferson and announced that they had a videotape of him allegedly stuffing bribe money into a freezer, some blacks loudly grumbled that the Democrat was the victim of a racial double standard. They noted that the FBI did not ransack the offices of Ohio Republican Rep. Bob Ney, also under legal fire, or California Republican Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, who resigned after pleading guilty to fraud, conspiracy to commit bribery and tax evasion.
NEWS
By JEFF JACOBY | September 17, 1995
It was in part at the urging of Sen. Alan Simpson, a Wyoming Republican, that the contemptible Bob Packwood finally threw in the towel and resigned from Congress. All the same, Mr. Simpson was embittered by the double standard at play in the Senate chamber."I looked around that room," he said, "and saw people who had done things much worse." Now which senior senator fromMassachusetts do you suppose he was referring to?If you're looking for double standards in the way members of Congress who behave sleazily are treated, Massachusetts is certainly the place to focus.
NEWS
By JEFF JACOBY | September 17, 1995
It was in part at the urging of Sen. Alan Simpson, a Wyoming Republican, that the contemptible Bob Packwood finally threw in the towel and resigned from Congress. All the same, Mr. Simpson was embittered by the double standard at play in the Senate chamber."I looked around that room," he said, "and saw people who had done things much worse." Now which senior senator fromMassachusetts do you suppose he was referring to?If you're looking for double standards in the way members of Congress who behave sleazily are treated, Massachusetts is certainly the place to focus.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 23, 1995
Although Michael Dingman has saved millions of dollars in U.S. taxes by renouncing his U.S. citizenship and moving to the Bahamas, he has given up one right:He no longer can contribute to American political campaigns.Which may not break his heart.Dingman, a "yacht person," who reaps great financial benefit by spurning the country of his birth, is the chairman and CEO of TTC Abex Inc., an aerospace company in New Hampshire.And, in the past, Abex has been generous to American politicians.In 1992, something called the Abex Inc. Employees for Sensible Government contributed $5,000 each to the successful campaigns of Republican U.S. Sen. Judd Gregg, Republican U.S. Rep. Bill Zeliff, and Democratic U.S. Rep. Dick Swett.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.