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By Michael Kinsley | April 3, 2005
IT WAS THE TV talker Chris Matthews, I believe, who first labeled Democrats and Republicans the "Mommy Party" and the "Daddy Party." Archaic as these stereotypes may be, they do capture general attitudes about the two parties. But we live in the age of the one-parent family, and it is Mom, more often than Dad, who must play both roles. It has not escaped notice that the Daddy Party has been fiscally misbehaving. But it hasn't really sunk in how completely the Republicans have abandoned allegedly Republican values - if, in fact, they ever really had such values.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 29, 2014
"Well, then," Jesus said, "give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God. " (Mark 12:17 Living Paraphrase) When considering what belongs to Caesar and what belongs to God, what happens when the federal government seeks to replace God by defining "church" and when life begins to have value, the latter having been done in Roe vs. Wade and subsequent court rulings? While there are other issues in the Hobby Lobby case argued before the Supreme Court on Tuesday, these are the major ones.
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NEWS
By Mona Charen | January 4, 1994
SUPPORTERS of President Clinton are wringing their hands these days, wondering why it is that the president evokes such hatred on the right.Now, I concede that there are strong feelings out there among conservatives, but not, as Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne would have it, because Mr. Clinton is such a powerful adversary. Let us not forget that this president was elected with only 43 percent of the vote.This is the administration that stumbled and backpedaled its way through the first year in office.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
For those of us born immediately after World War II, there is a distinct possibility many of us won't live to see another Republican elected president. As we drift into senescence, George W. Bush's tenure in office may be fondly recalled as a time "when we used to elect people called Republicans to the White House. " The reason is simple. Contrary to the values on which the Republican Party was founded, today's GOP has become the party of exclusion, espousing fear and ignorance. Will Hispanics and African-Americans soon forget?
NEWS
By Jim Fain BTC | October 10, 1990
ATTRIBUTING the budget fiasco to divided government is like blaming a hurricane on the tides. Having a president of one party and a Congress of another makes the mess harder to clean but did not cause it.Ronald Reagan managed that with his supply-side pipe dream. We could buy more guns with lower taxes, he said. Growth would pick up the check."Voodoo economics," George Bush said until Reagan woke him spiritually with the vice presidential nomination. Then he became star apostle of the free lunch mystique, subsequently pitching his own presidential bid on a no-tax pledge both he and thevoters knew was a lie.By then, he had spun himself into reverse so many times he was confident he could find a way to make Democrats take the political hit when he had to renege.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | February 27, 1991
FORTY YEARS ago today the Twenty-second Amendment to the Constitution, limiting presidents to two terms, was ratified.This was the Republican Party's equivalent of driving a stake through a dead Democratic vampire's heart. What a goof! The only live victims of the stake turned out to be Republican presidents. At last one, maybe two, maybe even three.George Washington did not like the job of president, so he said in his famous Farewell Address before the 1796 election that he would not accept another term.
NEWS
By Lionel S. Lewis | October 2, 2006
In light of the ever-changing character of America, there has long been a concern that the Supreme Court's members and their decisions cannot adequately reflect America's shifting variety of viewpoints, experiences and ways of understanding the Constitution. Today, as many as five of the court's nine members are identified as conservatives, while one-third to 40 percent of Americans describe themselves as such. In the last 50 years, all four of the court's chief justices and a great majority of associate justices have been appointed by Republican presidents, so the present court is not the first one whose members have largely been selected from the right.
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | February 17, 2006
Either the Republicans are getting better or my mathematics is getting worse. Every year about this time, I celebrate the release of the president's budget and his economic report by pouring a lot of the numbers from these documents into a spreadsheet. My goal is to reach an objective, scientific conclusion about which party governs better. (Look, everybody needs a hobby.) The theory is that over 30 or 50 or 80 years - however many the budget documents choose to record, and it varies - any special circumstances, such as war, will average out. Or if they don't, any general claims about the superiority of one party to another are meaningless, which is also a possibility.
NEWS
By Robert A. Burt | October 14, 1991
IF PRESIDENT BUSH has another opportunity to appoint a Supreme Court justice, he should choose a liberal Democrat. And the Senate should refuse to confirm anyone but a liberal Democrat for the next vacancy. Powerful historical reasons lead me to this conclusion.If Judge Clarence Thomas is confirmed, all but one of the justices on the court will have been appointed by Republican presidents (only Byron R. White was appointed by a Democrat, John F. Kennedy; the eight others were appointed by Republicans Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Ronald Reagan and Bush)
NEWS
November 18, 1991
Some Washington court watchers say there is likely to be another Supreme Court vacancy at the end of this term. It is not too early to think about filling it.Some Senate Democrats, embarrassed by their performance on the Clarence Thomas nomination, say they are reviewing their half of the process. Some Republicans say there is no need for the White House to review its half. But there is. If the next vacancy is caused, as anticipated, by retirement of the court's sole Democrat, Justice Byron White, or its sole liberal, Justice Harry Blackmun, it will present President Bush with an opportunity to do the unusual -- but something most previous presidents have done in certain circumstances.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | November 4, 2010
Watching election night coverage on the cable networks was quite entertaining, though I don't know why dozens of people were huddled together on CNN's set. It looked like the Last Supper squared. This is the kind of thing the fabled empty suits in TV land think is a good idea. It's not, unless confusion is the goal. Knowing the general shape of things — that the Democrats were going to be shellacked, with the only question being the extent of the shellacking — I couldn't resist looking at and listening to the gaggle of committed Obama worshipers on MSNBC either.
NEWS
September 9, 2009
No politics in Obama speech In his address to schoolchildren, President Obama merely followed a precedent established by two former Republican presidents to address the educational goals, values and responsibilities that should be important to every student in this country. As educators, we welcome the support of national leaders who encourage students to do their part and to do their best. Furthermore, a review of the suggested materials prepared by the Teaching Ambassador Fellows of the U.S. Department of Education (Pre-K-6, and Grades 7-12)
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | May 14, 2007
CHICAGO -- We all know that when it comes to war, Republicans are strong and resolute, while Democrats are weak and craven. We know because Republicans tell us so. Those have been the constant GOP themes in the congressional debate over the Iraq war. House Republican Leader John A. Boehner of Ohio accused Democrats who want to require withdrawal by a certain date of proposing "a timetable for American surrender." They were cheering for "defeat," charged Arizona Sen. John McCain. President Bush vowed that unlike his partisan opponents, he would not "cut and run."
NEWS
By Lionel S. Lewis | October 2, 2006
In light of the ever-changing character of America, there has long been a concern that the Supreme Court's members and their decisions cannot adequately reflect America's shifting variety of viewpoints, experiences and ways of understanding the Constitution. Today, as many as five of the court's nine members are identified as conservatives, while one-third to 40 percent of Americans describe themselves as such. In the last 50 years, all four of the court's chief justices and a great majority of associate justices have been appointed by Republican presidents, so the present court is not the first one whose members have largely been selected from the right.
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | February 17, 2006
Either the Republicans are getting better or my mathematics is getting worse. Every year about this time, I celebrate the release of the president's budget and his economic report by pouring a lot of the numbers from these documents into a spreadsheet. My goal is to reach an objective, scientific conclusion about which party governs better. (Look, everybody needs a hobby.) The theory is that over 30 or 50 or 80 years - however many the budget documents choose to record, and it varies - any special circumstances, such as war, will average out. Or if they don't, any general claims about the superiority of one party to another are meaningless, which is also a possibility.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | April 3, 2005
IT WAS THE TV talker Chris Matthews, I believe, who first labeled Democrats and Republicans the "Mommy Party" and the "Daddy Party." Archaic as these stereotypes may be, they do capture general attitudes about the two parties. But we live in the age of the one-parent family, and it is Mom, more often than Dad, who must play both roles. It has not escaped notice that the Daddy Party has been fiscally misbehaving. But it hasn't really sunk in how completely the Republicans have abandoned allegedly Republican values - if, in fact, they ever really had such values.
NEWS
April 29, 1997
WHAT A LONG ROAD it has been from Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty" to the "Presidents' Summit on Service" at Philadelphia's Independence Hall this week. The former relied on big money supplied by big government in what is generally regarded today as a failed program; the latter relies on big volunteerism supplied by what President Clinton calls "big citizenship."On the surface this may seem like so much sloganeering, and it really will be just that if there isn't targeted follow-through to rescue an estimated 15 million at-risk young Americans.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | May 14, 2007
CHICAGO -- We all know that when it comes to war, Republicans are strong and resolute, while Democrats are weak and craven. We know because Republicans tell us so. Those have been the constant GOP themes in the congressional debate over the Iraq war. House Republican Leader John A. Boehner of Ohio accused Democrats who want to require withdrawal by a certain date of proposing "a timetable for American surrender." They were cheering for "defeat," charged Arizona Sen. John McCain. President Bush vowed that unlike his partisan opponents, he would not "cut and run."
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin and Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
In the aftermath of the September terrorist attacks, Maryland voters - among the most Democratic in America - are thrilled with the job George W. Bush is doing as they grapple with lingering security fears and economic uncertainties. According to the latest Maryland Poll, Bush's approval rating is an astounding 83 percent among state voters, the vast majority of whom voted for Al Gore for president. When asked a year ago what kind of president Bush would be, only 45 percent predicted he would do a good job. Similarly, 76 percent of the state's voters say they agree with all the steps the Bush administration has taken to root out terrorists.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - Former President Gerald R. Ford, quoted by doctors as saying that "he feels good and wants to go home," was resting in a hospital here last night after suffering one or possibly two slight strokes, starting Tuesday night, that affected his balance and speech. Dr. Robert Schwartzman, chief of neurology at Hahnemann University Hospital, called the 87-year-old's prognosis "good" but said the former president will probably be kept in the hospital for "five or six days" for treatment and observation.
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