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Susan Reimer | September 2, 2012
Susan Reimer 's column abut the Republican platform on abortion again shows her expertise in setting up a straw man and then knocking him down ("Presidential election or abortion referendum?" Aug. 27). The Republican platform comprises about 45 pages and sets forth the Republican Party's proposals for every major issue that confronts America both domestically and internationally. Sanctity of life is only one of its more than 100 proposals. Yet in Ms. Reimer's biased and myopic view, the Republican platform concerns only abortion and does not deal with other important election issues.
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NEWS
September 5, 2012
It's a cloudy rainy dreary morning in Elkton and I'm looking for something to bring a smile, give a laugh or at least a chuckle so I check out The Sun's Sunday commentary section. There I find the column by Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. who appears to be serious when he picks on the Jewish community asking, "Can Jews be sure of Obama's commitment to Israel?" (Sept. 2). Come on now, Mr. Ehrlich, you know that, as a whole, the United States has always stood by Israel and we continue to; and that includes President Barack Obama.
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NEWS
August 25, 2012
Your recent editorial attempted to link Rep. Todd Akin's stupid and hopefully career-ending comments about rape with the GOP's overall philosophy on women's rights, even though the entire GOP leadership, including Gov. Mitt Romney and Rep. Paul Ryan, have called for his immediate withdrawal from the Missouri Senate race ("Republicans and rape," Aug. 22). Apparently, The Sun believes the GOP leadership is all about political positioning and that the Republican platform has it in for women's rights.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 2, 2012
Susan Reimer 's column abut the Republican platform on abortion again shows her expertise in setting up a straw man and then knocking him down ("Presidential election or abortion referendum?" Aug. 27). The Republican platform comprises about 45 pages and sets forth the Republican Party's proposals for every major issue that confronts America both domestically and internationally. Sanctity of life is only one of its more than 100 proposals. Yet in Ms. Reimer's biased and myopic view, the Republican platform concerns only abortion and does not deal with other important election issues.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
HOUSTON -- Republicans -- from Richard Nixon to George Bush -- have carried Harford County in each of the last five presidential elections.The key to a sixth success, say Harford leaders attending the Republican National Convention, will be Republican strategies to revamp the economy, education and environmental programs."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Bob Dole's announcement that he favors a Republican platform that preserves the party's anti-abortion stand but recognizes divergent viewpoints was generally welcomed yesterday by anti-abortion conservatives, some of whom had threatened to disrupt the party's convention.With his two-pronged pronouncement Thursday night, Dole sought to avert a divisive fight within the party.His aim was to reassure conservatives that he would not try to weaken the party's anti-abortion plank, while also reaching out to abortion-rights proponents by proposing a platform clause that espouses "decent regard for the opinions of those who disagree."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Two Republican world views collided loudly here yesterday, suggesting that the search for common ground on social issues such as abortion may be a long one for the Republican Party.At a forum sponsored by a group of centrist Republicans, conservatives asserted that it was mythology to suggest that President George Bush lost the election last year because of his opposition to legalized abortion, or because of the perception that the Republican Party had moved too far to the right.
NEWS
By Carmen Amedori | August 31, 2008
Carmen Amedori, 52, is a resident of Westminster and was a state delegate representing Carroll County from 1998 until 2004, when she was appointed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to serve on the Maryland Parole Commission. A native of Baltimore and graduate of Villa Julie College, Amedori worked as a paralegal and journalist while raising two daughters, before entering the world of politics. She was one of the few elected officials in Maryland who supported John McCain when he ran for president in 2000 and was an alternate delegate at that year's convention.
NEWS
By Robin Toner and Robin Toner,New York Times | May 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Two Republican world views collided loudly here yesterday, suggesting that the search for common ground on social issues such as abortion may be a long one for the Republican Party.At a forum sponsored by a group of centrist Republicans, conservatives asserted that it was mythology to suggest that President George Bush lost the election last year because of his opposition to legalized abortion, or because of the perception that the Republican Party had moved too far to the right.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1998
Todd A. Arterburn may be new to politics, but he's already learned one valuable lesson in his campaign for the House of tTC Delegates: Serve lots of free food, but give the speech first.So, as ribs and side dishes awaited the packed crowd at Johnny Star Rib Co. in Ellicott City, the 36-year-old Republican and golf course developer formally announced his underdog bid to dislodge Democrat Elizabeth Bobo from her west Columbia seat.Arterburn is new enough to the Howard County political scene that older politicians don't know much about him. Some Republicans acknowledge that his campaign is a long shot: He's an unknown running against a well-recognized Democrat in a solidly Democratic district; even his campaign manager, Robert S. Grandfield, is a Democrat.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 27, 2012
The platforms that the two political parties publish every four years are a lot like the warranties that come with washers or refrigerators: Nobody ever reads them, but if you do, you find that nothing in them actually applies. This year, though, the Republican platform is getting lots of attention because it contains a plank calling for a human life amendment to the Constitution that outlaws abortion and makes no exception for rape, incest or the health of the mother. That's pretty much the same pro-life plank that was in party platforms in previous campaigns, but it is in the spotlight because of the clueless comments of Congressman Todd Akin - that a woman's reproductive system actually shuts down during rape, preventing conception - and the selection by Mitt Romney of Paul Ryan as his running mate, a man who describes himself as "as pro-life as you can get. " But let me ask you this, as the Republicans convene in Tampa: Are you pregnant and contemplating an abortion?
NEWS
August 25, 2012
Your recent editorial attempted to link Rep. Todd Akin's stupid and hopefully career-ending comments about rape with the GOP's overall philosophy on women's rights, even though the entire GOP leadership, including Gov. Mitt Romney and Rep. Paul Ryan, have called for his immediate withdrawal from the Missouri Senate race ("Republicans and rape," Aug. 22). Apparently, The Sun believes the GOP leadership is all about political positioning and that the Republican platform has it in for women's rights.
NEWS
By Carmen Amedori | August 31, 2008
Carmen Amedori, 52, is a resident of Westminster and was a state delegate representing Carroll County from 1998 until 2004, when she was appointed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to serve on the Maryland Parole Commission. A native of Baltimore and graduate of Villa Julie College, Amedori worked as a paralegal and journalist while raising two daughters, before entering the world of politics. She was one of the few elected officials in Maryland who supported John McCain when he ran for president in 2000 and was an alternate delegate at that year's convention.
TOPIC
By Curtis Wilkie and Curtis Wilkie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
Sen. Trent Lott's apologies for endorsing the Dixiecrat movement of 1948 is not the first time the Republican leader has had to back away from remarks that demonstrate his affinity for the Lost Cause of the Confederacy and its segregationist heritage. In 1981, when Lott was a ranking conservative congressman from Mississippi, he managed to embarrass President Ronald Reagan by encouraging the administration to reverse a government policy that denied tax-exempt status to private schools practicing racial discrimination.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1998
Todd A. Arterburn may be new to politics, but he's already learned one valuable lesson in his campaign for the House of tTC Delegates: Serve lots of free food, but give the speech first.So, as ribs and side dishes awaited the packed crowd at Johnny Star Rib Co. in Ellicott City, the 36-year-old Republican and golf course developer formally announced his underdog bid to dislodge Democrat Elizabeth Bobo from her west Columbia seat.Arterburn is new enough to the Howard County political scene that older politicians don't know much about him. Some Republicans acknowledge that his campaign is a long shot: He's an unknown running against a well-recognized Democrat in a solidly Democratic district; even his campaign manager, Robert S. Grandfield, is a Democrat.
NEWS
August 24, 1996
BOB DOLE spoke with eloquence when he told the Republican National Convention that he wanted his party to be "broad and inclusive." He reminded listeners that it was "the party of Lincoln," and said anyone who did not want the party to be open to all races should head for the exits "which are clearly marked."But the Republican problem isn't just throwing white racists out, it is drawing blacks in. Merely to say to them they can be included isn't enough. The party has to offer black voters attractive ideas and candidates.
TOPIC
By Curtis Wilkie and Curtis Wilkie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
Sen. Trent Lott's apologies for endorsing the Dixiecrat movement of 1948 is not the first time the Republican leader has had to back away from remarks that demonstrate his affinity for the Lost Cause of the Confederacy and its segregationist heritage. In 1981, when Lott was a ranking conservative congressman from Mississippi, he managed to embarrass President Ronald Reagan by encouraging the administration to reverse a government policy that denied tax-exempt status to private schools practicing racial discrimination.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 17, 1992
A committee has been called a cul-de-sac into which ideas are lured to be quietly strangled. Not so the Republican platform committee. Its handiwork shows clearly the conflicting ideas in the party's divided mind, and the nation's past.The secret of being a bore is to tell everything and the platform is, in vast stretches, chloroform in print. It covers (among many other subjects) the Hobbs Act, mortgage revenue bonds, Cyprus and the U.N. trusteeship in Palau. But beneath the tangled underbrush of little details lurks a large contradiction that reflects the mingling of the Republican past and present.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 13, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- So the Republican Party opens its convention with a bad case of appendicitis.All Bob Dole wanted to do was apply a little salve to the party's perennial, or quadrennial, abortion wounds. He prescribed a balm of "tolerance" to be applied to the Republican platform. "Either we're tolerant or we're not, " said the candidate. The platform committee said: "Not."The one place in America where hard-line pro-lifers hold the majority view is at the Republican convention. There, the power players stiffed both the candidate's request and the moderates' proposal to "acknowledge and respect honest convictions that divide us."
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 1, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Robert Dole is a fine man and will make a good president (yes, you can call that a prediction). But glimpses of how his mind works on some subjects are perplexing. There is, for example, the curious matter of his handling of the abortion plank in the Republican platform.As everyone knows, the would-be nominee had finessed the issue, only to stomp all over his elegant creation just a couple of days later. Senator Dole at first said that the party would retain the pro-life plank it has included in every platform since 1980 but would put a statement in the preamble expressing tolerance for differing ideas.
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