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NEWS
October 6, 1997
TOMORROW COULD PROVE pivotal for campaign finance reform. Unless Republican moderates back a watered-down bipartisan bill to ban unregulated "soft money" to political parties, a deadlocked Senate could shelve the matter indefinitely.The vote will be close. All 45 Senate Democrats support the McCain-Feingold bill along with four Republicans. That leaves them one vote shy of the 50 votes they need to enable Vice President Al Gore to break a tie.But before this vote is taken, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott has mischievously put forth another amendment designed to torpedo the bill.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2014
At a time when the Republican Party needs a heavy dose of compromise to bring functionality back to government, one of its most admirable models of goodwill and working across the aisle has departed with the death at 88 last week of Howard Henry Baker Jr. of Tennessee. The state's first elected GOP senator, former Senate majority leader, Reagan White House chief of staff and presidential aspirant was a gentle throwback to the brand of moderate conservatism that got things done without breaking the china.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 12, 2012
As if Mitt Romney's defeat weren't a cross enough to bear, the kind of campaign he ran could make him uniquely a man on the outside of his party looking in. His chameleon-like shades of Republicanism - he presented himself as "severely conservative" during the GOP primaries to appeal to the party base but then moved toward the center as Moderate Mitt from Massachusetts to woo independents - could make him a pariah in both circles from now on....
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 12, 2012
As if Mitt Romney's defeat weren't a cross enough to bear, the kind of campaign he ran could make him uniquely a man on the outside of his party looking in. His chameleon-like shades of Republicanism - he presented himself as "severely conservative" during the GOP primaries to appeal to the party base but then moved toward the center as Moderate Mitt from Massachusetts to woo independents - could make him a pariah in both circles from now on....
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
IN A WORLD of political strife and confrontation, the Senate of Maryland has been an oasis of bipartisanship and collegiality.Until now, at least.With the defeat of two leading Republican moderates in last week's primary, Senate Democrats are worried that their smooth-running chamber could become a scene of confrontation and gridlock.Baltimore County Sen. F. Vernon Boozer, the minority leader, and Frederick County Sen. John W. Derr, the minority whip, had their long legislative careers ended by aggressive young challengers aligned with the Christian right.
NEWS
September 21, 1995
For the first time ever, a black American is being sized up by the nation as a potential president. That Colin Powell has brought this about is, alone, reason for the nation saying "thank you" to him.He has helped us grow up. He has done so by the simple device of succeeding brilliantly in the American institution that has done the most to provide equal opportunities to all. He was never a "black soldier" and he is not likely to be a "black candidate" if...
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a boost for one of President Bush's prime initiatives, the House voted mostly along party lines yesterday to approve a bill to allow more federal money to go to religious charities that deliver social services. Republican leaders overcame protests from Democrats and moderate Republicans that the charities would be exempt from a federal ban on discrimination in hiring on the basis of religion. The bill passed 233 to 198. The leaders secured the votes after pledging that changes would be made to the bill after it goes to the Senate to bar religious groups that receive federal money from discriminating on other grounds, particularly against homosexuals.
NEWS
April 23, 1993
"There's a lot I have to learn about this town," President Clinton remarked this week after a Republican filibuster killed his jobs-stimulus bill in the Senate. Indeed there is. But before this setback is chalked up solely to his inexperience, a word needs to be said about inept Democratic leadership on Capitol Hill. Not only did it fail to keep its own troops in line, or to warn Mr. Clinton of disaffection in the ranks, but it totally misjudged what was happening in the Republican camp.How, one might ask, could Senate Democratic leaders go so wrong?
NEWS
August 2, 1995
Will the bulk of House Republicans ever get the message that the words "conservative" and "conservation" have the same roots? Will they ever perceive that Americans, in voting for a GOP-controlled Congress last November, were not voting to drink dirty water or breathe dirty air or destroy such precious resources as the Chesapeake Bay and the wetlands that nourish and purify it?The answer, alas, is a vociferous negative if House Republican whip Tom DeLay expresses the will of lawmakers out to eviscerate the Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Senate, overcoming a lengthy Republican filibuster, passed and sent to President Clinton yesterday a landmark bill intended to make voter registration easier for millions of Americans.What had been a fierce test of wills over the GOP's ability to exert its influence in a new era of undivided Democratic government finally ended when five moderate Republicans broke ranks and joined the Democrats in passing the so-called motor voter bill by a vote of 62-36.Final passage of the bill, held up in the Senate for more than two months by Republican delay tactics, had been assured following a compromise reached late last month by House and Senate negotiators, who modified two key provisions to win the Republican moderates' support.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | April 8, 2012
Meet Nathan Fletcher, candidate for mayor of San Diego. He will lose, at least if the polls are right. But he has raised a minor stir through a video posted online a few days back. In it, he explains his decision to leave the Republican Party and identify henceforth as an independent. "I don't believe we have to treat people we disagree with as an enemy," he says. "I think we can just say sometimes we disagree. ... I've fought in a war," adds Mr. Fletcher, a Marine who served in Iraq.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 14, 2012
Sometimes less is more, more or less. Sometimes, less is all you have and all you have will do just fine. Sometimes, the small things, the short things, the bits and pieces are worth keeping because they might be one day useful; my father felt that way about stove bolts. Walter Hard, a Vermont folk poet of Robert Frost's generation, once told of the frugal Yankee woman - was there any other kind? - who left a bag in her attic labeled, "Pieces of string too short to use. " So, alrighty then, that's my preamble and I'm going with it. Here, forthwith, are pieces of column too short to use ... • Suggestion for the Baltimore merchants who oppose Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposal to increase the city's bottle tax to five cents to pay for school renovations: Turn what you see as a problem into an opportunity.
NEWS
By Chris Meekins | November 5, 2009
A familiar song is being sung after Tuesday's loss by Republicans in a special congressional election in upstate New York. It tells a story about how a moderate Republican was pushed out by conservative ideologues, resulting in a Democratic victory in what would have been a safe Republican seat. Many in Maryland remember this song, as it was sung after the 2008 race in Maryland's 1st Congressional District. Conservative state Sen. Andy Harris defeated the incumbent, liberal Republican Rep. Wayne Gilchrest, in the primary.
NEWS
By JANET HOOK AND RICHARD SIMON and JANET HOOK AND RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 11, 2005
In an embarrassing setback for President Bush and the beleaguered Republican Party, House GOP leaders abruptly put off a vote yesterday on a bill to cut spending after failing to round up enough votes to pass the measure. GOP leaders remained a few votes short, even after days of arm twisting and making a major concession to wary Republican moderates - stripping out a provision that would have authorized drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. House leaders expressed confidence that they would have the votes next week to pass the $50 billion in spending cuts, a measure they have portrayed as part of a new, more determined effort to reduce the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 2002
WASHINGTON - Some well-known conservative Republicans are joining moderate Democrats in an effort to build public support here and abroad for ousting Iraq's President Saddam Hussein. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, a Georgia Republican, and retired Sen. Bob Kerrey, a Nebraska Democrat, are among the senior advisers for the newly formed Committee for the Liberation of Iraq. The advocacy group, which has close ties to the Bush administration, is led by Randy Scheunemann. Scheunemann is a former consultant to Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld on Iraq issues and former national security adviser to Sen. Trent Lott, a Mississippi Republican and the incoming majority leader.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 6, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's success in getting enough fellow Republicans in the House to swallow his compromise deal on a patients' bill of rights demonstrated a new aggressiveness on his part. But he still must cope with the Democrats' determination not to let him steal one of their favorite issues. Whether he charmed or strong-armed Republican Rep. Charles Norwood of Georgia, who had been locked in an alliance with the Democrats on a version seeking stronger patient access to the courts against health maintenance organizations, Mr. Bush snatched at least temporary victory from very possible defeat with the compromise deal.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A small band of Republican moderates, seemingly out of step with the conservative-dominated House, has political weight beyond its numbers and has begun to throw it around.The moderate contingent has challenged the leadership on a pivotal element of the proposed balanced-budget amendment, a centerpiece of the Republicans' "Contract with America," the document that undergirded the sweeping Republican congressional victories last fall.In addition, their public doubts about a leadership plan to cut off welfare benefits for legal immigrants appear to have nudged the new House speaker, Newt Gingrich, to voice second thoughts that have put him at odds with his key lieutenants.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It's a commentary on the state of moderation in today's Republican Party that the challenge to Senate Republican Whip Alan Simpson for re-election to that post by Sen. Trent Lott was raised on grounds that he wasn't conservative enough. Calling Simpson a moderate is like calling a card-carrying liberal like Ted Kennedy a moderate on the Democratic side.But everything, in politics as in life, is relative, as in the old vaudeville gag: "How's your wife?" "Compared to what?" The Grand Old Party has moved so far to the right in the past 20 to 30 years that good upstanding conservatives like Simpson are obliged to defend themselves against what he himself the other day called a "saliva test of purity" to remain acceptable within the club.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a boost for one of President Bush's prime initiatives, the House voted mostly along party lines yesterday to approve a bill to allow more federal money to go to religious charities that deliver social services. Republican leaders overcame protests from Democrats and moderate Republicans that the charities would be exempt from a federal ban on discrimination in hiring on the basis of religion. The bill passed 233 to 198. The leaders secured the votes after pledging that changes would be made to the bill after it goes to the Senate to bar religious groups that receive federal money from discriminating on other grounds, particularly against homosexuals.
NEWS
May 24, 2001
ON WASHINGTON'S political Richter scale, today's expected announcement by Vermont Sen. James M. Jeffords that he's leaving the Republican Party rates as a historic earthquake. It would reshape the landscape and shake the Congress and White House - assuming it doesn't touch off a spate of GOP and Democratic moderates jumping ship for the other party. Reverberations and after-shocks could continue for years. Suddenly, Democrats would control the Senate. Suddenly, the Bush administration's ambitious right-wing agenda would be in trouble.
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