Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRepublican Majority
IN THE NEWS

Republican Majority

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Heading into the campaign's final hours, the Republicans appear better positioned than the Democrats to gain control of a closely divided Congress in Tuesday's elections. But many analysts are predicting that control of Congress will remain split between the parties, a reflection of the nation's 50-50 partisan balance and a recipe for continued stalemate on important issues. "When we come out of this, I think it'll be similar to the numbers when we went in," said Stu Rothenberg, who publishes an independent newsletter on congressional elections.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2013
The Sun has developed a bad case of selective memory when it comes to judicial nominations ("Judicial profiling," June 5). When President George W. Bush nominated candidates for judgeships during the years that Republicans controlled the Senate, the Harry Reid-led Democrats, for the first time in history, filibustered several of them, including a Hispanic nominee for the same D.C. Court of Appeals they are complaining about today. There was no cry of outrage from The Sun then about this shameful practice, nor was there any attempt by The Sun to play the race card, despite compelling evidence that the filibuster was done solely to prevent Mr. Bush from appointing a Hispanic to a high-profile judgeship.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 25, 1991
Roscoe G. Bartlett, a candidate for the 6th District House of Representatives seat, discussed his campaign with Republican leaders in Washington on Sept. 12.Bartlett met with Representative Wayne Gilcrest, R-1st, Sen.Jesse Helms, R-N.C., and members of GOPAC, an organization working for a Republican majority in Congress."Good, the Congress needs more conservative Republicans," said the North Carolina senator after learning that Bartlett was a candidatefor the Maryland seat.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
Roscoe Bartlett is a Maryland original. The state's only Republican in Congress is a charter member of the House tea party caucus. Yet he boasts that he's personally directed more than half a billion dollars in earmarked federal spending, much of it to his district, which sprawls from the banks of the Susquehanna in the east to the West Virginia border. His conservative voting record tracks the party line, but he broke with President George W. Bush and almost sounds like a liberal in criticizing U.S. involvement in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - A Texas grand jury indicted yesterday three political fund-raisers with ties to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay. They are suspected of funneling illegal corporate campaign funds to Republican candidates for state office. DeLay, a Texas Republican who is one of Congress' most powerful members, was not charged but is the subject of a House Ethics Committee complaint accusing him of improperly involving a federal agency in a Texas partisan matter, soliciting campaign contributions in return for legislative favors and violating campaign finance laws.
NEWS
November 28, 1998
KENNETH Starr did his utmost to accumulate evidence of high crimes and misdemeanors for the House to use in impeaching President Clinton, and failed. That is the conclusion most fair-minded people take from his referral and testimony to the House Judiciary Committee, scrutinizing the Monica Lewinsky affair while omitting the more serious allegations Mr. Starr was assigned to investigate.But that is not the conclusion that the committee's Republican majority wishes to reach. Its Dec. 1 hearing looms as an exercise in public relations to persuade more American people of the gravity of the perjury charges.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Texas grand jury indicted a political action committee linked to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay yesterday, alleging that it accepted illegal campaign contributions during the 2002 election that led to a historic realignment of the Texas Legislature. The charges, which include separate indictments against one of the state's oldest and largest employer groups, arose out of an investigation by local prosecutors, begun more than two years ago, into the use of corporate money to bankroll Republican candidates for state office.
NEWS
September 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The following response was released yesterday by the White House:STATEMENT BY THE PRESS SECRETARYThe process leading up to today's events has been deeply flawed. The rank partisanship that led to the wholesale release of these materials, most of which are irrelevant, is regrettable. The unprecedented violation of grand jury secrecy that has resulted from the release of these materials is similarly unfortunate. And the gratuitous decision to make certain that the most salacious details were included -- despite a bipartisan staff agreement to keep them out -- raises questions as to the intent of the Republican majority.
NEWS
October 5, 1996
LOPSIDED as the presidential election may appear on the eve of the Clinton-Dole debates, the races for control of the next Congress are breathtakingly close and steeped in imponderables.Whichever party wins the Senate and the House, its margin is likely to be razor-thin even if President Clinton is re-elected in a landslide. Our shaky guess at this stage is that the Republicans will hold the House, but only by about 10 seats compared to 34 at present, and will be lucky to keep even a majority of one (down from three)
NEWS
June 9, 2013
The Sun has developed a bad case of selective memory when it comes to judicial nominations ("Judicial profiling," June 5). When President George W. Bush nominated candidates for judgeships during the years that Republicans controlled the Senate, the Harry Reid-led Democrats, for the first time in history, filibustered several of them, including a Hispanic nominee for the same D.C. Court of Appeals they are complaining about today. There was no cry of outrage from The Sun then about this shameful practice, nor was there any attempt by The Sun to play the race card, despite compelling evidence that the filibuster was done solely to prevent Mr. Bush from appointing a Hispanic to a high-profile judgeship.
NEWS
Ron Smith | July 16, 2010
Democrats are beginning to panic as we speed toward the midterm elections. They have good reason to get nervous as they ponder the spectacle - so unlikely a year or so ago - of being reduced once again to a minority in the House of Representatives. The deservedly repudiated Republicans miraculously stand to benefit from the anger of the dispossessed middle class. These are indeed strange times. Baltimore's own native daughter, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, is unhappy that White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs blurted out a widely known truth Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press" when he was asked whether House Democrats could lose their substantial majority and replied that that was entirely possible.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | January 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The members of the 110th Congress won't be sworn in until today, but the new era of bipartisanship pledged by Republicans and Democrats in recent weeks is grinding to a close. House Republicans are protesting what they say are plans by the new Democratic majority to shut them out of the legislative process as they pass their "First 100 Hours" package - a violation, they say, of the Democrats' campaign pledge to restore cooperation and civility to Washington. "We are disappointed that at this point in the game, half of the Congress has been cut out of the process," said Rep. Adam H. Putnam of Florida, chairman of the House Republican Caucus.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,Los Angeles Times | September 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. John T. Doolittle, a California Republican, has called disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff a friend. Doolittle used Abramoff's skybox at a Washington sports arena for fundraising and has refused to return political donations from Abramoff. Now the congressman is the target of attack ads. One features an argument over whether Doolittle is "corrupt or ineffective." Even so, Doolittle is favored to win re-election. Ethics scandals cast a shadow over the last session of Congress, and the "culture of corruption" under the Republican majority was expected to be a major Democratic theme in the midterm campaign.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | March 22, 2006
ARLINGTON, VA. -- Not so long ago, in a country that now seems far, far away, Ronald Reagan told the nation: "We don't have deficits because people are taxed too little. We have deficits because big government spends too much." He uttered those words in a year when Democrats controlled the House (the body in which spending legislation originates) and the national debt, according to the Bureau of Public Debt, was $2.3 trillion. Last week, a Republican Senate voted to raise the debt ceiling to nearly $9 trillion.
NEWS
By CARL HULSE and CARL HULSE,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Tom DeLay, under pressure from colleagues and swept into an election-year lobbying scandal, abandoned his effort yesterday to remain House majority leader. The move touched off a battle for the House Republican leadership in a campaign season tinged by corruption. In letters sent yesterday to fellow House Republicans and Speaker Dennis Hastert, DeLay said he supported the call for an election of a new leader and was stepping aside to avoid becoming a political liability as Republicans battle to hold their majority.
NEWS
By LIANNE HART and LIANNE HART,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2005
AUSTIN, TEXAS -- A judge heard arguments yesterday over whether the money-laundering and conspiracy case against Rep. Tom DeLay, a Texas Republican, should be dismissed - with the defense asserting that the charges are flawed and the prosecution arguing that the powerful lawmaker should be held accountable for circumventing election laws. DeLay is charged with illegally funneling corporate campaign contributions to Republican candidates in Texas' 2002 legislative races. He appeared in court with his wife at his side but did not make any statements.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - Tossing a parting grenade as he steps aside as Senate majority leader, Trent Lott declared yesterday that Republicans "must begin to wage the war" against Democrats when the latter take control of the Senate this week. Lott's comments, in a memorandum to "Republican opinion leaders" that his office released to the news media, were the latest in a drive by the Mississippi senator to reassert his leadership. Since Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont announced that he was leaving the Republican Party to become an independent, shifting control of the Senate, Lott has been under fire for not doing enough to stop him. Although prominent Republicans have been grumbling about Lott, they also say it is unlikely that anyone will try to topple him soon because there is no obvious successor and because he has developed a sound relationship with President Bush.
NEWS
By LIANNE HART and LIANNE HART,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2005
AUSTIN, TEXAS -- A judge heard arguments yesterday over whether the money-laundering and conspiracy case against Rep. Tom DeLay, a Texas Republican, should be dismissed - with the defense asserting that the charges are flawed and the prosecution arguing that the powerful lawmaker should be held accountable for circumventing election laws. DeLay is charged with illegally funneling corporate campaign contributions to Republican candidates in Texas' 2002 legislative races. He appeared in court with his wife at his side but did not make any statements.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Texas grand jury indicted a political action committee linked to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay yesterday, alleging that it accepted illegal campaign contributions during the 2002 election that led to a historic realignment of the Texas Legislature. The charges, which include separate indictments against one of the state's oldest and largest employer groups, arose out of an investigation by local prosecutors, begun more than two years ago, into the use of corporate money to bankroll Republican candidates for state office.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.