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By Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2010
The Associated Press hasn't called the GOP gubernatorial primary yet, but the Republican Governors Association has. At 8:51 p.m., RGA spokesman Chris Schrimpf sent reporters a statement congratulating former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. "Maryland voters know the difference Bob Ehrlich can make for their state," Schrimpf said. "Bob fought off Democratic tax increases and helped create 100,000 private sector jobs. Under [Democratic Gov. Martin] O'Malley all those jobs and more were lost and what's worse taxes went up by 1.3 billion dollars, the most in history.
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NEWS
June 25, 2014
Dan Rodricks ' recent column extolling one Republican candidate for governor as moderate is nonsense ( "Republicans getting down to business," June 21). He noted how this guy was not going to get into the abortion issue. Yep, the same lie that was said by the current governor of North Carolina. The same thing on gay marriage because "the people have spoken. " That is not moderate, that is a reality because they lost that battle. I won't vote for any Republican, ever. As a party, they have been in lock step against every proposal put forth by President Barack Obama.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 23, 1994
WILLIAMSBURG, Va.--GOP National Chairman Haley Barbour, addressing the new class of 30 Republican governors at their annual conference just concluded here, called them "our best and brightest, the people who are proving that Republican ideas work." The net gain of 11 Republican governors on Nov. 8, he said, resulted "because you proposed and carried out policies and programs that are both good policy and good politics. ... You have practiced the politics of performance."Barbour went on: "Governors govern, so you have been able to put the principles of smaller government into action and to demonstrate [that]
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
For Republican candidates for governor, there's simply not enough Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to go around. He's like the father in a large family whose kids compete for his attention but can't manage to get Dad all to themselves. Ehrlich, who in 2002 became Maryland's first Republican governor in three decades and is now promoting a book, has long been telling the candidates he won't choose a favorite in Tuesday's primary. That hasn't stopped them from invoking his name, likening themselves to him, seeking his fundraising assistance and, in at least one case, using his beaming face in a campaign commercial.
NEWS
By Richard L. Berke and Richard L. Berke,New York Times News Service | November 22, 1994
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- The name cards on the table all read "Governor" or "Governor-elect," followed by the last name and state. Except one. The title line on the card in front of the woman in the red plaid suit read simply, "Ellen."The Republican leadership was in an awkward spot yesterday as Ellen Sauerbrey of Maryland insisted on appearing at the meeting of the Republican Governors Association with her new colleagues -- although it seems highly unlikely that they are her new colleagues.Mrs.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 26, 1997
MIAMI -- When Republican governors meeting here were asked the other day if their education plan included a provision for abolishing the federal Department of Education, John Engler of Michigan had a quick answer.''It's irrelevant,'' he said, ''because even if Congress passed a bill to abolish it, President Clinton would veto it.''Ideological pointsThe popular Michigan governor thus -- perhaps inadvertently, perhaps not -- demonstrated the difference between the Republicans who control Congress and those who hold 32 state governorships.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
MIAMI -- Fresh from victories in Virginia and New Jersey, Republican governors met in Miami over the weekend to plot strategy for 36 gubernatorial elections in 1998. They declared that education would be the next issue they would use to try to move power from Washington to the states.On top of the Republicans' education agenda is a request that Congress and the Department of Education eliminate federally required paperwork and regulations on schools."What we want Congress to do with education is exactly what it did with welfare three years ago," said South Carolina Gov. David Beasley, the incoming chairman of the Republican Governors' Association.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Republican governors are sending a message to their leaderless party: Follow us.Hailed as models of success in their own states, the "new Republican" governors are suddenly being embraced by GOP officials as the salvation of a party that got the wind knocked out of it on Election Day.This week, at the first post-election party gathering, the governors will showcase their popularity, talk up their pragmatic conservatism, and try to take a...
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | November 18, 1998
LISTEN carefully to the keening in Republican ranks after this year's election, and you can hear a distinct echo of the Democratic lament during the party's darkest days of the 1980s.After the massacre of 1984, when President Reagan won 49 states in a record-setting re-election, Democrats still controlled 34 governorships, three more than Republicans do now. As they picked through the wreckage, smart Democratic governors such Arizona's Bruce Babbitt (now the Interior secretary) all asked themselves the same question: Why are my party's national leaders sinking like lead in the same states where we're golden?
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 21, 1994
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- Attempting to allay fears from the states about the impact of proposed federal spending cuts, top Senate Republicans met privately in Washington yesterday with a contingent of Republican governors.The meeting in the office of Sen. Bob Dole, the Republican leader, came only hours before the governors gathered here for a three-day conference that is expected to focus on the relationship between the states and the new Republican majority on Capitol Hill."Our message will be to the Republican congressional leaders and to the people of this country: Give us the ball and then get out of the way. We can solve these problems," Gov. Mike Leavitt of Utah, the incoming chairman of the Republican Governors Association, said at an opening news conference last night.
NEWS
By Gregory Kline | January 23, 2014
With less than 10 months before Marylanders elect a new governor, the race to succeed Martin O'Malley is more wide open then ever. Candidates in both major parties are still contemplating whether to join the race as the Feb. 25th filing deadline nears. Just this week, Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger announced he would not run for the state's highest post, while Rep. John Delaney appears to be still contemplating a run. While the state's Democratic machine long ago lined up behind Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown - who has received several key endorsements, has a high-profile running mate and has raised millions - strong challengers have still arisen from within the party.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 8, 2013
With frustration building over Washington's refusal to behave in the public interest, perhaps it's worth noting a drastic solution tried by the Irish. Last Friday, Irish voters cast ballots on a referendum to abolish the country's Upper House, known as the Seanad. Prime Minister Enda Kenny said Ireland didn't need all of its politicians and they should be made to suffer along with everyone else as the country continues to struggle economically. The measure to abolish the Seanad lost by just 42,500 votes out of more than 1,226,000 cast (51.8 percent to 48.2 percent)
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Letter writer Joe Everett made a valid point about the Voting Rights Act but failed to see the bigger picture and the totally inequitable situation that needs to be addressed ("Where was the outcry when Md. voters were harmed?" June 27). In the last federal election, more people voted for Democratic congressional candidates than for Republicans. Yet Republicans came away with 33 more seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and a big, unwarranted majority. Decades of gerrymandering by Republican governors in red states has had the perverse effect of minimizing the political clout of urban areas and their voters.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
A bipartisan group of governors expressed concern Saturday over the impact looming federal budget cuts will have on their states but had few ideas for how to break the latest fiscal impasse gripping Congress. Most of the nation's governors, including Maryland's Martin O'Malley, are in Washington attending a meeting of the National Governors Association - an annual gathering that this year happens to fall just days before $85 billion in across-the-board federal spending reductions are set to begin.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
The General Assembly returned to Annapolis today, and the biggest idea floating around comes from across the Potomac. With the details of Gov. Martin O'Malley's agenda a mystery for the time being, lawmakers in Maryland's capital find themselves confronted by a bold, if not altogether sound, idea from Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell to increase the commonwealth's transportation funding by $3.1 billion over the next five years. On Tuesday, he proposed eliminating the politically unpopular gas tax altogether and replacing it with higher sales taxes, a variety of fees and as-yet nonexistent revenue from taxing sales over the Internet.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
CHARLOTTE -- Speaking to members of Iowa's influential delegation to the Democratic convention on Wednesday, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley took a shot at several Republican governors while laying out a broad vision for the party that some suspect he hopes to one day lead. The delegation meeting was the latest of several O'Malley has attended this week -- he has also appeared before delegates from Ohio and Texas, for instance. But given Iowa's first-in-the-nation role in the presidential primary season, his visit here led to inevitable talk of his own political ambitions in 2016.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 25, 1998
NEW ORLEANS -- At the Republican Governors Conference here the other day, Gov. John Engler of Michigan was asked by a reporter whether he thought the strong re-election of Gov. George W. Bush of Texas and the election of his brother, Jeb, in Florida marked "the new generation" taking over leadership of the Republican Party.Mr. Engler noticeably blanched. "We've got a lot of people in that new generation," he finally said, meaning himself among others who also easily won re-election. The Bush brothers, he said, "don't do it all by themselves.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | August 21, 1991
SEATTLE -- The nation's governors called for dramatic changes in America's health care system yesterday but split along party lines over whether to hold Congress and the Bush administration accountable for the reform.In an unusually emotional and partisan conclusion to the four-day National Governors' Association conference here, governors stressed the urgent need for health reform in a nation that pays the most for care while leaving 34 million people uninsured."One thing is clear: There is a sense of urgency here that has been vocalized," said Colorado Gov. Roy Romer, a Democrat, the NGA's new vice chairman.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | June 6, 2012
Democrat Tom Barrett's defeat in Wisconsin is also a loss for Gov. Martin O'Malley and his Democratic Governors Association which poured about $3.2 million into the attempt to topple Republican Gov. Scott Walker. O'Malley noted in a statement that Democrats were outspent "ten to one" in Wisconsin. He looked for the silver lining of last night's election results in Wisconsin, saying in a statement that "Republican governors across the country are on notice" and "The people of their states will not tolerate partisan overreach.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | February 5, 2012
Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley played surrogate for the Obama administration Sunday morning, appearing on CNN's State of the Union to offer his views on the GOP presidential nomination fight, the president's chances for re-election and the economy. O'Malley was paired with Republican Gov. Robert McDonnell of Virginia for the roughly 10 minute piece. Each chairs his respective party's governors association. O'Malley had the in-studio advantage, sitting across the table from CNN host Candy Crowley.
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