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Republican Contract

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By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, rode into Bel Air Tuesday afternoon as the brightest star in the Harford County Republican Central Committee's display of solidarity.Imitating national and state signing ceremonies, the county's GOP Central Committee had local candidates add their signatures to a "Republican Contract with the Citizens of Harford County."The ceremonial signing of the two-paragraph statement was held to let voters know that GOP candidates are "committed to individual liberty, economic opportunity and personal responsibility through limited and effective government."
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler | May 4, 1997
WASHINGTON - Hot talk in the Senate the other day was that a volatile Republican privately referred to a female colleague as a "bitch." In the House, word had it that the Judiciary committee chairman called a congressman who challenged his honor a "son of a bitch."Meanwhile, in an open session with reporters, Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle questioned the motives of the Republican chairman investigating a disputed Democratic election.Majority Leader Trent Lott shot back, also in public, that the Democrats ought to "grow up a little bit; any time they don't get their way, [they]
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Before Paul Simon retires from the Senate in a couple of years, he intends to board up the back door to the Alamo.Simon, a Democratic liberal from Illinois, has for some years tried to get Congress to pass a constitutional amendment that would force it to balance the federal budget.The heart of the amendment is simple: "Total outlays for any fiscal year shall not exceed receipts for that fiscal year."But, as one pundit put it, the concept sends shivers down Congress' spine -- or would if it had one.Congress can balance the budget without an amendment.
NEWS
By PETER H. STONE | July 30, 1995
Since early in the year, an elite group of K Street lobbyists with strong Republican pedigrees has been huddling every few weeks with Rep. John A. Boehner, Republican of Ohio, to discuss the House Republican leadership's performance and its strategies for implementing its "Contract with America."Many of those in the group were formerly lobbyists for the White House or top aides to Republican congressional leaders. In the Bush administration, for instance, Washington lobbyists Nicholas E. Calio and Gary J. Andres ran the White House's liaison operations with the House, doing much of their work out of the offices of then-Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, Republican of Georgia.
NEWS
October 1, 1994
The House Republican leadership staged what one observer called "the mother of all photo ops" on the steps of the U.S. Capitol this week.Over 300 Republican candidates for House seats (including 152 of 157 incumbents running again) posed for the cameras and signed a "Republican Contract with America." This is 10-point program that Republicans say they are pledged to pass next year if voters give the party control of the House.The 10 points include some old standbys of the conservative wing of the Grand Old Party, such as a balanced budget constitutional amendment, tax cuts and increased defense spending.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | December 26, 1994
New Orleans. -- Every day since the Republicans won the elections I've woken up with a hangover -- and I haven't been drinking. I keep dreaming that someone turned me in for being an alien. Then I wake up and I remember: I'm not. I'm a U.S. citizen. But just as I relax, I open the paper and see that the new proposals on law and order in the land call for a lot of snitching.Republicans want to force pregnant mothers to tell who the fathers are before they can get an abortion. In California, they are trying to get teachers to snitch on kids that might be aliens.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- With the House Republicans' "Contract with America" half completed, some objectives were quickly reached. These included requiring Congress to observe the same workplace laws that apply to the rest of the country, an independent audit of Congress, cuts in House committees and staffs, limits on committee chairmanships, an end to proxy voting in committee and opening most committee meetings to press and public.Of the specific legislative proposals, the House has passed the following in one form or another: the line-item veto, a constitutional amendment to balance the budget, new anti-crime and defense bills and limits on unfunded mandates on states.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The fast-paced Republican timetable for passage of the party's conservative revolution encountered its first major delay yesterday as House GOP leaders abandoned their promise to move for massive spending cuts by the end of January.Slippage of the central element of the Republican agenda might jeopardize the 100-day timetable for the House Republican "Contract with America." House leaders acknowledged that they are having more trouble identifying and agreeing upon the $200 billion in spending cuts needed to finance the contract than they had anticipated, marking the first serious setback for the newly powerful Republicans.
NEWS
By Barbara Ransby | November 18, 1994
THE DUST had barely settled after Election Day when Newt Gingrich began to hold court with the media. Even before his coronation he pledged quick action on the conservative agenda. He promised cooperation, but not compromise. Enter, King Newt.Yes, the Republicans won, but the emperor still has no clothes. Look at who didn't vote, and why: Only 38.7 percent of the electorate made it to the polls on Election Day, and less than two-thirds of those voted Republican. With three-quarters of the electorate silent or opposed, the Republican Congress hardly has a mandate for their right-wing agenda.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | May 4, 1997
WASHINGTON - Hot talk in the Senate the other day was that a volatile Republican privately referred to a female colleague as a "bitch." In the House, word had it that the Judiciary committee chairman called a congressman who challenged his honor a "son of a bitch."Meanwhile, in an open session with reporters, Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle questioned the motives of the Republican chairman investigating a disputed Democratic election.Majority Leader Trent Lott shot back, also in public, that the Democrats ought to "grow up a little bit; any time they don't get their way, [they]
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- With the House Republicans' "Contract with America" half completed, some objectives were quickly reached. These included requiring Congress to observe the same workplace laws that apply to the rest of the country, an independent audit of Congress, cuts in House committees and staffs, limits on committee chairmanships, an end to proxy voting in committee and opening most committee meetings to press and public.Of the specific legislative proposals, the House has passed the following in one form or another: the line-item veto, a constitutional amendment to balance the budget, new anti-crime and defense bills and limits on unfunded mandates on states.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The fast-paced Republican timetable for passage of the party's conservative revolution encountered its first major delay yesterday as House GOP leaders abandoned their promise to move for massive spending cuts by the end of January.Slippage of the central element of the Republican agenda might jeopardize the 100-day timetable for the House Republican "Contract with America." House leaders acknowledged that they are having more trouble identifying and agreeing upon the $200 billion in spending cuts needed to finance the contract than they had anticipated, marking the first serious setback for the newly powerful Republicans.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | December 26, 1994
New Orleans. -- Every day since the Republicans won the elections I've woken up with a hangover -- and I haven't been drinking. I keep dreaming that someone turned me in for being an alien. Then I wake up and I remember: I'm not. I'm a U.S. citizen. But just as I relax, I open the paper and see that the new proposals on law and order in the land call for a lot of snitching.Republicans want to force pregnant mothers to tell who the fathers are before they can get an abortion. In California, they are trying to get teachers to snitch on kids that might be aliens.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Before Paul Simon retires from the Senate in a couple of years, he intends to board up the back door to the Alamo.Simon, a Democratic liberal from Illinois, has for some years tried to get Congress to pass a constitutional amendment that would force it to balance the federal budget.The heart of the amendment is simple: "Total outlays for any fiscal year shall not exceed receipts for that fiscal year."But, as one pundit put it, the concept sends shivers down Congress' spine -- or would if it had one.Congress can balance the budget without an amendment.
NEWS
By Barbara Ransby | November 18, 1994
THE DUST had barely settled after Election Day when Newt Gingrich began to hold court with the media. Even before his coronation he pledged quick action on the conservative agenda. He promised cooperation, but not compromise. Enter, King Newt.Yes, the Republicans won, but the emperor still has no clothes. Look at who didn't vote, and why: Only 38.7 percent of the electorate made it to the polls on Election Day, and less than two-thirds of those voted Republican. With three-quarters of the electorate silent or opposed, the Republican Congress hardly has a mandate for their right-wing agenda.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, rode into Bel Air Tuesday afternoon as the brightest star in the Harford County Republican Central Committee's display of solidarity.Imitating national and state signing ceremonies, the county's GOP Central Committee had local candidates add their signatures to a "Republican Contract with the Citizens of Harford County."The ceremonial signing of the two-paragraph statement was held to let voters know that GOP candidates are "committed to individual liberty, economic opportunity and personal responsibility through limited and effective government."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 8, 1994
With all 435 House seats at stake this fall and voter anger with Washington running high, the 1994 election has the potential to produce major changes in Congress. President Clinton and the Democrats are hoping to keep their losses to a minimum, while Republicans dream of gaining control of the House for the first time in 40 years.This is one in an occasional series on selected House races around the country, and the second report on the campaign in the 5th District of North Carolina.WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- If you want to capture the 1994 campaign for the House of Representatives in a single episode, a debate here the other night between Democrat A. P. Sands and Republican Richard Burr would be a good place to start.
NEWS
By PETER H. STONE | July 30, 1995
Since early in the year, an elite group of K Street lobbyists with strong Republican pedigrees has been huddling every few weeks with Rep. John A. Boehner, Republican of Ohio, to discuss the House Republican leadership's performance and its strategies for implementing its "Contract with America."Many of those in the group were formerly lobbyists for the White House or top aides to Republican congressional leaders. In the Bush administration, for instance, Washington lobbyists Nicholas E. Calio and Gary J. Andres ran the White House's liaison operations with the House, doing much of their work out of the offices of then-Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, Republican of Georgia.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 8, 1994
With all 435 House seats at stake this fall and voter anger with Washington running high, the 1994 election has the potential to produce major changes in Congress. President Clinton and the Democrats are hoping to keep their losses to a minimum, while Republicans dream of gaining control of the House for the first time in 40 years.This is one in an occasional series on selected House races around the country, and the second report on the campaign in the 5th District of North Carolina.WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- If you want to capture the 1994 campaign for the House of Representatives in a single episode, a debate here the other night between Democrat A. P. Sands and Republican Richard Burr would be a good place to start.
NEWS
October 1, 1994
The House Republican leadership staged what one observer called "the mother of all photo ops" on the steps of the U.S. Capitol this week.Over 300 Republican candidates for House seats (including 152 of 157 incumbents running again) posed for the cameras and signed a "Republican Contract with America." This is 10-point program that Republicans say they are pledged to pass next year if voters give the party control of the House.The 10 points include some old standbys of the conservative wing of the Grand Old Party, such as a balanced budget constitutional amendment, tax cuts and increased defense spending.
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