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By DAN BERGER | January 5, 1995
The cost of a 3-cent stamp went from 29 to 32 cents and the Post Office has no machines dispensing 3-cent stamps.Chechnya 1, Russia 0 -- halftime score.Cheer up. The Republican Congress is on the job.
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NEWS
By Barack Obama | March 29, 2014
As Americans, we believe that honest work should be rewarded with honest wages. That certainly means that no one who works full-time should ever have to raise a family in poverty. In the coming weeks, your senators will have a chance to stand up for that principle by voting yes or no on a bill to raise the minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour. It's important to remember that most workers who would get a raise when Congress passes this bill aren't teenagers taking on their first job. They average 35 years old. A majority of lower-wage jobs are held by women.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 16, 1997
Now the Republican Congress can investigate the Democratic attorney general, and vice versa.According to Justice Department figures, crime is down everywhere but where you may be standing.E7Jackie Robinson integrated baseball, not Brooklyn.Well, it's getting to be nearly time to start thinking about doing the old income-tax return, isn't it?Pub Date: 4/16/97
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | October 10, 2013
The United States is currently in the midst of a leverage crisis, only it is a crisis that stems from political institutions rather than economic ones. The political leverage crisis concerns Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court, and it is animated by the excessive leveraging tactics of the House Republicans, especially the extremist faction of the House Republican caucus. "Leverage" is a concept borrowed from ancient physics referring to the property of a lever and fulcrum to create maximum force with minimum effort.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 2, 1996
The only thing voters in Oregon like less than the Democratic president is the Republican Congress. Maybe else- where, too.Steve Forbes is a side dish the conventional candidates never ordered.The interest-rate reduction is a reminder that the Democratic president gets re-elected only if Republican Fed members keep him out of recession.Most of the insiders who deny having written ''Primary Colors'' cannot stand not being suspected.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 8, 1999
News is when Peter does nothing.Giuliani is running against Arnold Lehman for the upstate vote, while Mrs. Clinton goes global against Pat Buchanan.A lot of Democrats want to run against one Clinton or the other or both, but young George W. Bush (no fool he) has decided to run against the Republican Congress.You can't keep a good Dow down.Pub Date: 10/08/99
NEWS
January 29, 1995
"Perhaps not as conservative as might have been expected from a Republican president addressing a Republican Congress, the message nevertheless was much farther to the right than would have been anticipated if the Democrats had been returned to power."The Sun, Page 1, Jan. 7, 1947.Bill Clinton, meet Harry Truman. Forty-seven years ago, President Truman delivered the first Democratic State of the Union speech to a Republican Congress in over a quarter-century. He was, as President Clinton was last Tuesday, conciliatory and dropped several pet programs from the agenda he had pushed the previous two years, to a Democratic Congress.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As he had promised, President Clinton last night vetoed a sweeping Republican plan to overhaul the nation's welfare programs and end the federal guarantee of aid to the poor.The veto was politically risky for Mr. Clinton, since the Republican initiative has broad public support and the president ran for election on a pledge to "end welfare as we know it."But Mr. Clinton argued that the Republican blueprint would be too harsh on children because it would, among other things, cut money for disabled children and provide too little aid for child care for parents who get off welfare and take jobs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- After a long trip to China that his aides believe strengthened the president against the Republican Congress and Kenneth W. Starr, the independent prosecutor, President Clinton returned home this weekend and immediatelytook to the air waves on a domestic issue -- his high hopes for improving fruit juice.In his weekly radio address yesterday morning, Clinton did not mention human rights or economic growth in China, or the future of U.S.-China relations. Instead, he announced new regulations to increase the safety of fruit and vegetable juices.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - The second-ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives pronounced the congressional session a failure yesterday, blaming the GOP leadership yesterday for letting the clock run out on the 108th Congress without resolving key issues including the federal budget, transportation funding and intelligence reform. "The Republican-controlled Congress waved a white flag at the U.S. Capitol yesterday," Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Southern Maryland said in a four-minute radio address on his party's behalf.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 24, 2013
President Obama's second term is already beleaguered by the same barrier that stymied his first four years - a Congress that seems unable or unwilling to get its most serious business done. He looks longingly if not overly optimistically toward the 2014 congressional elections to bring him a Democratic majority on Capitol Hill that may be a pipedream. A previous Democratic president named Harry Truman knew how to capitalize on what he famously called a "Do-nothing Congress" in 1948.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 4, 2012
Ayatollahs seem to just appoint themselves and then start enforcing their own brand of orthodoxy. Grover Norquist has been doing that in the Republican Party for years. Mr. Norquist has never been elected to anything. Nobody ever said he should be in charge of the GOP's true religion (although he claims President Ronald Reagan urged him to found his lobbying group, Americans for Tax Reform). But he certainly has been the Republicans' key political theologian who made opposition to tax increases the party's central tenet for more than 25 years.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 15, 2012
He is referred to everywhere as Gov. Mitt Romney, even though he hasn't been a governor for six years. It's a practice I have never understood. "Former" or "ex" is more accurate but apparently not as polite. Anyway, as polls are starting to shift toward Mr. Romney, I have been thinking that I could live with a President Romney if he actually was Governor Romney, the moderate Republican who was elected in the deep, deep blue state of Massachusetts in 2003. We have glimpsed that Romney in recent days, as the candidate attempts to tack to the center in the final weeks before the election.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
I was sorry, but not surprised, to hear that the Republican/tea party is content to see the airline industry benefit from uncollected taxes while ignoring the needs of union members, construction and support workers and the flying public ("In other congressional idiocy…" Aug. 3). While these workers are on furlough due to the inaction of Congress, I hope they will make sure they are registered to vote so that they can help these members see what it is like to be laid off. Alma T., Baltimore
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jill Zuckman,Chicago Tribune | January 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In one of its first official acts under Democratic control, the House voted 280-152 yesterday to curb the middle-of-the-night, backroom deal-making that resulted in approval of embarrassing - and sometimes illegal - pork barrel projects. Forty-eight Republicans joined 232 Democrats to require committees to disclose all sponsors of so-called earmarks. The new rules would prohibit lawmakers from trading their votes for spending projects tacked on to legislation, and it would require members to certify that they have no personal financial stake in their requests.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | January 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The members of the 110th Congress won't be sworn in until today, but the new era of bipartisanship pledged by Republicans and Democrats in recent weeks is grinding to a close. House Republicans are protesting what they say are plans by the new Democratic majority to shut them out of the legislative process as they pass their "First 100 Hours" package - a violation, they say, of the Democrats' campaign pledge to restore cooperation and civility to Washington. "We are disappointed that at this point in the game, half of the Congress has been cut out of the process," said Rep. Adam H. Putnam of Florida, chairman of the House Republican Caucus.
NEWS
April 14, 1996
WHAT IS GRIDLOCK to some voters is the checks and balance system to others. Traditionally Americans have looked to Congress to curb an excess of power in the presidency. But this year, if a New York Times/CBS poll is reasonably accurate, the pressure goes the other way.Working in President Clinton's favor is the public's supposed wariness about turning both the White House and the Congress over to the Republicans for the first time since Dwight D. Eisenhower's 1952 victory. With voters blaming Speaker Newt Gingrich and the Republican Congress for two government shutdowns, the GOP in this post-primary season is at its lowest point in voter esteem in 12 years.
NEWS
By BOB DOLE | June 8, 1995
Washington -- DEMOCRATS ARE complaining about Republican "isolationism" and congressional involvement in foreign policy.How strange.Apparently the liberal establishment is surprised that a Republican Congress would actually propose measures that reflect the thinking of Republican members and the American people.Rather than working with Congress, President Clinton has resorted to sloganeering, calling a Republican foreign-aid bill isolationist.The president has threatened to veto the House legislation, which would make foreign aid less wasteful and more efficient, while Senate Democrats have slowed committee action on parallel legislation.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Johanna Neuman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- For decades, efforts to give the District of Columbia a voting representative in Congress have run into a wall. Constitutional amendments failed to win the states' support. Ad campaigns about "taxation without representation" did not help. Now, unexpected political forces are aligning behind a plan to give the district a House vote - at the same time giving Utah a new seat in Congress - when lawmakers return for their lame-duck session in early December. "This is closest we've come in at least 30 years," said Ilir Zherka, executive director of DCVote, an umbrella lobbying group.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Saying Congress needs more physicians to craft the nation's health care policies, Owings Mills physician Gary Applebaum said yesterday that he's running for the seat in Maryland's 3rd Congressional District. Applebaum, 46, is the only Republican seeking the seat held by Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, who is running for the U.S. Senate. Seven Democrats have entered the race. Applebaum, a former executive at Erickson Retirement Communities in Catonsville, said he recently mailed paperwork to the Federal Election Commission and will make an announcement soon.
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