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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 11, 2001
George W. Murphy III, a Republican candidate for county commissioner in 1998, has switched his affiliation to the Green Party and has filed his intention to run next year on an environmental platform. "There are a tremendous number of independents in Carroll County," said Murphy, 53, an instructional assistant at Liberty High School. "If you can get them motivated, you will have a respectable showing in a crowded field." Because he is not running on the ticket of either major party, Murphy must first gather a minimum of 250 signatures by Aug. 28. Once those signatures are verified, Murphy's name would be placed on the ballot for the Nov. 5 general election.
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NEWS
March 13, 2013
In case anyone has missed the dueling budget proposals out this week from Rep. Paul Ryan on the Republican side and Sen. Patty Murray for the Democrats, don't fret. You could easily have slept through the last four months and missed nothing. They are pretty much where the two sides have been for even longer than that. And that pretty well sums up where Washington stands on the issue of federal spending, taxes and the deficit. Both parties have won approval to some degree from voters for taking these stands, and so the incentive for actually coming up with a compromise is clearly too small for either to go out on a limb — at least for the moment.
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NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - Across a range of domestic and foreign-policy issues, the gap between the views of Republican and Democratic partisans is wider than at any point in the past 16 years, a major new survey has found. The survey, by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, portrays a nation profoundly polarized between two political camps that are nearly identical in size but inimical in their beliefs on almost all major questions. The center, which began measuring public opinion in 1987, found in its new poll that the disagreement between Republicans and Democrats is greater than ever on topics such as national security, the social safety net, big business and equal rights for minorities.
NEWS
By Jerome Miller | September 15, 2011
A plethora of contemporary political phenomena that may otherwise seem only bizarre — the various "pledges" not to compromise, the rejection of Social Security as a Ponzi scheme, the denial of evolution and climate change — begin to make sense once one recognizes that the historical analogy used to describe the movement responsible for them is inaccurate. Don't think 1774, 1776 and the Boston Tea Party. Think 1832, 1860 and nullification. Historically, nullification meant the sheer refusal of a state government to accept and abide by national legislation — specifically, in 1832, a tariff law with which South Carolina was unwilling to comply.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2000
WASHINGTON - Promising a pox on both political parties, an array of activists warned yesterday that they will take over the streets outside the Republican and Democratic national conventions. "We've had enough," said Margaret Prescod, a leader of the R2D2K Coalition of protest groups. "Get ready for a democratic intervention on both coasts of the United States this summer." The movement includes many of the anti-globalist militants who disrupted the World Trade Organization conference in Seattle and besieged the World Bank meetings in Washington this year.
NEWS
November 2, 1994
While the Republican Party seeks to establish majorities in Congress by knocking off Democratic office-holders on Nov. 8, Maryland's Second Congressional District is one piece of turf the GOP must fight to defend. The seat became open when Rep. Helen Bentley, the five-term Republican incumbent, launched her ultimately unsuccessful gubernatorial bid. Given the district's conservative demographics and Republican voting patterns, Mrs. Bentley might have held onto the seat for many more years.
NEWS
August 31, 1994
As a political event, it was primarily a white-glove affair. No quarreling or pointed queries allowed. No sparring with opponents. No give-and-take. At the end of the 90-minute gubernatorial forum, the candidates were left frustrated and unfulfilled. The voters were shortchanged.That, sadly, was the outcome of Monday night's televised gubernatorial forum at College Park. Rules established by the League of Women Voters were so restrictive that no debate was possible. The brevity of the responses (45 seconds, tops)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A health care debate between leading Republican and Democratic senators grew sharply partisan yesterday as Sen. John D. "Jay" Rockefeller IV, a West Virginia Democrat, accused Senate GOP leader Bob Dole of Kansas of opposing reform in order to advance his presidential ambitions."
NEWS
August 17, 1998
IN THE 7th District, which covers the Rosedale and Dundalk areas, Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr. faces a weak opponent in liquor store owner Anthony J. Narutowicz. Mr. Stone, who has held his seat since 1967, is not a leader in Annapolis; we would like to see him wield greater influence. But he is decent and a good constituent servant and deserves the Democratic nomination. That would effectively give him the seat again because no Republican is running.For three House seats, Republican and Democratic voters will each choose three candidates.
NEWS
By Rick C. Wade | December 17, 2004
FOR YEARS, many African-Americans, tired of being ignored by Republicans and taken for granted by Democrats, have been crying in the wilderness. Democrats are hearing their cries, but Republicans seem to be responding to them. While no one foresees a great exodus of black voters to the Republican Party, a growing number of them are regarding Republicans favorably because of the GOP's ability to claim and define issues that matter to them as individuals, such as jobs, taxes, business and values.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
Both the letters from Michael P. DeCicco ("Health bill stagnation is not Republicans' fault," Feb. 12) and Kathleen Farno ("Republicans to blame for health care bill's flaws," Feb. 15) did an excellent job defending their partisan political positions. But what their responses failed to do is recognize the anger and frustration that non-partisan independents and clear thinking party moderates have with both parties not working together for the betterment of this great country. Instead of the leaders of the Republican and Democratic party blaming each other for the health bill fiasco, it seems to me an apology is needed to the American public by the leaders of both parties in Congress and by President Obama for the bill's failure.
NEWS
February 16, 2010
Blame it on cabin fever or election-year politicking, but Democrats and Republicans in Annapolis have not only grown more heated but downright peculiar in their discussions over the state budget. When the often-ignored GOP senators regard being given a forum to speak their minds as a bad thing, you know the antics inside the Maryland State House are getting even stranger than usual. As one might expect, all the huff and puff adds up to not much more than hot air -- only useful if it could be directed toward melting this winter's snow.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Reporter | June 25, 2007
Howard's Ken Ulman is a Democrat and Anne Arundel's John R. Leopold is a Republican, but on environmental issues these days, it may be hard to see much difference between the two county executives. Since taking office in December, Ulman has proposed a laundry list of anti-global warming initiatives, from a carbon emissions study and the purchase of 25 hybrid county vehicles to giving tax breaks to developers and residents who go green. He screened former Vice President Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth for his entire administration in April.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun Reporter | October 15, 2006
Whistling Past Dixie: How Democrats Can Win Without the South Thomas F. Schaller Simon & Schuster / 336 pages / $26 Southern voters have been an important component of Republican and Democratic presidential victories for more than four decades. Since the 1964 passage of the Civil Rights Act, GOP presidential candidates have actively courted white Sutherners and convinced them that the party supports their economic and moral positions. Employing what has come to be known as a "Southern Strategy," party nominees have regularly carried such states as Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and South Carolina as presidents from Richard Nixon to Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush won the White House.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown and Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | September 25, 2006
With a down-to-the-wire primary behind him, Democratic Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin enters the U.S. Senate general election contest with an 11-point lead over his rival, Republican Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, according to a new poll for The Sun. Six weeks before the November vote, Cardin leads Steele, 51 percent to 40 percent, according to the statewide survey of 815 likely voters. But with Republican and Democratic parties expected to flood the state with money and appearances in the weeks to come, the race remains volatile.
NEWS
By Craig Shirley | September 14, 2006
U.S. Sen. Lincoln Chafee's tough fight to overcome conservative challenger Stephen Laffey in Tuesday's primary in Rhode Island, and the stunning defeat of three-term incumbent Democratic Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman in the Connecticut primary, are among the final steps in a process that began more than 40 years ago in San Francisco at the Republican National Convention. There, conservatives finally prevailed and nominated one of their own, Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona, as their standard bearer.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Congress fills in the details of the budget deal struck by President Clinton and Republican leaders, there is likely to be less of everything than its backers expect -- less tax relief, less deficit reduction, less spending for social programs.Clinton and the GOP leadership made so many promises to build bipartisan support for the broad outlines of the agreement, announced Friday in Baltimore, that it may be impossible to redeem them all.Thus, while Congress is expected to easily approve the nonbinding budget resolution endorsing the spending blueprint by Memorial Day, there are likely to be some nasty fights ahead as the various factions who supported the deal try to collect their chits.
NEWS
By Jill Zuckman and Jan C. Greenburg and Jill Zuckman and Jan C. Greenburg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush will meet today over breakfast with Republican and Democratic Senate leaders to discuss a replacement for retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. The four lawmakers - Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee, Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter, a Pennsylvania Republican, and Vermont Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Committee - will arrive at the White House not knowing whether Bush will float specific names for their reaction or just generally hear them out. Democrats have stressed that the advice-and-consent clause of the Constitution compels the president to discuss the nomination with members of the Senate before he makes a decision.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | August 27, 2006
As the seven candidates for Anne Arundel County Executive near the final two weeks of their primary campaigns, the Democratic contest is becoming more bruising, while the Republican race remains fairly genteel. On the Democratic side, former county parks director Dennis Callahan has repeatedly questioned the leadership of Sheriff George F. Johnson IV, who holds a substantial lead in fundraising. But the five Republicans - Dels. David G. Boschert and John R. Leopold, former Del. Phillip D. Bissett, assistant schools superintendent Gregory V. Nourse and Baltimore teacher Tom Angelis - generally avoided attacks on one another during a debate Thursday evening at Anne Arundel Community College.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
Candidates' forums can be inconvenient -- and lengthy -- to attend, but a politically diverse group of Howard County bloggers is planning an electronic question-and-answer session for the general election that voters can use when and how they please. Although Republicans David Keelan and Dave Wissing and Democrats Ian Kennedy and Evan Coren do not share the same political philosophy, they all started local blogs based on politics or development, and they eventually connected and decided to collaborate.
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