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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 26, 1991
LONDON -- Unionist political leaders in Northern Ireland yesterday agreed to overt, face-to-face talks with nationalists -- the first in 15 years -- in a new effort to solve the bloody conflict in the province.They announced that they had "responded positively" to a proposal by Peter Brooke, Britain's secretary for Northern Ireland, for all-party talks that will eventually involve the government of the Irish Republic.Mr. Brooke, who is expected to make a parliamentary statement today or tomorrow, had set an Easter deadline for agreement on the talks.
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NEWS
March 18, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH did the right thing yesterday in snubbing Gerry Adams, leader of Northern Ireland's Sinn Fein, by not agreeing to meet with him for St. Patrick's Day. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy did the right thing in snubbing him, too. Now, neither should do the wrong thing by trying to keep the nationalist party permanently frozen out of the negotiations over the future of Ulster. The Good Friday agreement of 1998 put Northern Ireland on the path to a resolution of its sectarian troubles, but in the seven years since then, that path has proved to be neither smooth nor straight.
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NEWS
August 16, 2001
THE IRISH Republican Army has some explaining to do. Colombian police arrested three Northern Irishmen, two solidly identified as convicted Provisional IRA terrorists, for teaching bomb-making to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Their clothes tested positive for several kinds of munitions and for cocaine. That is hardly consistent with the ceasefire the IRA maintains in the British Isles to qualify its partner Sinn Fein for political respectability. It suggests a collision course between friends of the IRA and the United States government, which is aiding Colombia's defense of its sovereignty.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
THE IRISH Republican Army has some explaining to do. Colombian police arrested three Northern Irishmen, two solidly identified as convicted Provisional IRA terrorists, for teaching bomb-making to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Their clothes tested positive for several kinds of munitions and for cocaine. That is hardly consistent with the ceasefire the IRA maintains in the British Isles to qualify its partner Sinn Fein for political respectability. It suggests a collision course between friends of the IRA and the United States government, which is aiding Colombia's defense of its sovereignty.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 2, 1991
DUBLIN, Ireland -- The Irish government will be "flexible and imaginative" when it meets pro-British unionists from Northern Ireland for the first time ever in multiparty peace talks, officials here said yesterday.The Irish government will be called to the negotiating table as soon as the political parties of Northern Ireland have reached broad agreement on internal provincial political reforms.The second phase of the negotiations, expected to start early next month, will focus on the relationship between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 2, 1999
As Marxism sinks into history, perhaps the bloodiest monster on earth is tribalism. Yugoslavia is a daily-deepening bloodbath. Israelis and Arab Palestinians go on savaging each other. In Sri Lanka, once a paradise of peace, slaughter abounds. And so it goes, across the globe, in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and beyond.Is there a more maddening example of that monster at work than in Northern Ireland? There, about 1 million nominally Protestant people of Scottish or English origin and something more than a half-million predominantly Roman Catholics of Gaelic roots are -- to most outsiders anyway -- indistinguishable in appearance, language and way of life.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- The Rev. Ian R. K. Paisley rises in his pulpit like Captain Ahab in the bow of a whaling boat, a harsh, obsessive, blackclad figure wielding his Bible like a harpoon.His Moby Dick is unification of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The Irish Republican Army is for him the incarnation of evil, the pope in Rome the Antichrist.He sees treachery, betrayal and surrender everywhere. He is the implacable foe of compromise to whom great majorities of Protestant, pro-British Ulstermen have turned in past times of crisis.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH did the right thing yesterday in snubbing Gerry Adams, leader of Northern Ireland's Sinn Fein, by not agreeing to meet with him for St. Patrick's Day. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy did the right thing in snubbing him, too. Now, neither should do the wrong thing by trying to keep the nationalist party permanently frozen out of the negotiations over the future of Ulster. The Good Friday agreement of 1998 put Northern Ireland on the path to a resolution of its sectarian troubles, but in the seven years since then, that path has proved to be neither smooth nor straight.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | December 5, 1993
Snap?As the ice age of international politics known in modern history as the Cold War continues its thaw, the most resounding cracks have been heard from those regions of the deepest political rigidity: Germany, Russia, the Middle East, South Africa.So in this climate it was not unreasonable to anticipate a loud snap from Northern Ireland, a frigid conjuncture of near-perpetual conflict, venerable animosities and lovingly cultivated hatreds.Quite possibly it was audible last week, with the admission by the British government's Northern Ireland secretary, Sir Patrick Mayhew, that London had maintained contacts with the Irish Republican Army "for some years" -- this despite its repeated avowals it would never deal with such men of violence as these.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 13, 1998
LONDON -- Desperate to inject life into the fraying Northern Ireland peace process, the British and Irish governments yesterday unveiled their joint blueprint of a deal to end the conflict that has cost more than 3,000 lives since 1969.The power-sharing agreement amounts to an artful compromise, offering something to nearly everyone in a bid to defuse decades of religious and political struggle between majority Protestants and minority Roman Catholics.The document envisions the two sides cooperating in a new Northern Ireland Assembly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 2, 1999
As Marxism sinks into history, perhaps the bloodiest monster on earth is tribalism. Yugoslavia is a daily-deepening bloodbath. Israelis and Arab Palestinians go on savaging each other. In Sri Lanka, once a paradise of peace, slaughter abounds. And so it goes, across the globe, in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and beyond.Is there a more maddening example of that monster at work than in Northern Ireland? There, about 1 million nominally Protestant people of Scottish or English origin and something more than a half-million predominantly Roman Catholics of Gaelic roots are -- to most outsiders anyway -- indistinguishable in appearance, language and way of life.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 1998
DUBLIN, Ireland -- At first glance, the agreement aimed at ending three decades of street warfare and other violence in Northern Ireland seems like a political winner here in the Republic of Ireland. In contrast to the North, where it is the subject of relentless and often vitriolic debate, in Ireland the accord has the support of every major political party.Who, after all, could object to peace?But while the agreement represents a momentous step in resolving one of this century's most persistent conflicts, government and other political figures in Ireland say they face a surprisingly daunting challenge in persuading the more than 2 million eligible voters to turn out on May 22, when it will be put to referendums here and in Northern Ireland.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 13, 1998
LONDON -- Desperate to inject life into the fraying Northern Ireland peace process, the British and Irish governments yesterday unveiled their joint blueprint of a deal to end the conflict that has cost more than 3,000 lives since 1969.The power-sharing agreement amounts to an artful compromise, offering something to nearly everyone in a bid to defuse decades of religious and political struggle between majority Protestants and minority Roman Catholics.The document envisions the two sides cooperating in a new Northern Ireland Assembly.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | October 9, 1997
PARIS -- The writer Sean O'Faolain, who fought alongside Eamon de Valera in 1921, and belonged to the Irish Republican Army for six years, wrote a quarter-century ago that "Our Nationalism has for far too long been our Egoism" -- which no longer can really be said of the Irish Republic, but remains a sinister truth in Northern Ireland.Yet even in the North, where to paraphrase O'Faolain, nationalism long ago bloated into xenophobia and chauvinism, it today is imaginable that history might have taken a positive turn.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 30, 1997
LONDONDERRY, Northern Ireland -- Bloody Sunday haunts Roman Catholic priest Edward Daly.He remembers the sound of gunfire and the death of a teen-ager named Jackie Duddy. He recalls waving a white handkerchief as he ferried the wounded past British army soldiers. He forgets, though, how many times he administered last rites to the young men who lay sprawled in the streets of his city on Jan. 30, 1972."The events of that day were a defining moment in the history of this community," Daly says.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- The Rev. Ian R. K. Paisley rises in his pulpit like Captain Ahab in the bow of a whaling boat, a harsh, obsessive, blackclad figure wielding his Bible like a harpoon.His Moby Dick is unification of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The Irish Republican Army is for him the incarnation of evil, the pope in Rome the Antichrist.He sees treachery, betrayal and surrender everywhere. He is the implacable foe of compromise to whom great majorities of Protestant, pro-British Ulstermen have turned in past times of crisis.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 1998
DUBLIN, Ireland -- At first glance, the agreement aimed at ending three decades of street warfare and other violence in Northern Ireland seems like a political winner here in the Republic of Ireland. In contrast to the North, where it is the subject of relentless and often vitriolic debate, in Ireland the accord has the support of every major political party.Who, after all, could object to peace?But while the agreement represents a momentous step in resolving one of this century's most persistent conflicts, government and other political figures in Ireland say they face a surprisingly daunting challenge in persuading the more than 2 million eligible voters to turn out on May 22, when it will be put to referendums here and in Northern Ireland.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 30, 1997
LONDONDERRY, Northern Ireland -- Bloody Sunday haunts Roman Catholic priest Edward Daly.He remembers the sound of gunfire and the death of a teen-ager named Jackie Duddy. He recalls waving a white handkerchief as he ferried the wounded past British army soldiers. He forgets, though, how many times he administered last rites to the young men who lay sprawled in the streets of his city on Jan. 30, 1972."The events of that day were a defining moment in the history of this community," Daly says.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | December 5, 1993
Snap?As the ice age of international politics known in modern history as the Cold War continues its thaw, the most resounding cracks have been heard from those regions of the deepest political rigidity: Germany, Russia, the Middle East, South Africa.So in this climate it was not unreasonable to anticipate a loud snap from Northern Ireland, a frigid conjuncture of near-perpetual conflict, venerable animosities and lovingly cultivated hatreds.Quite possibly it was audible last week, with the admission by the British government's Northern Ireland secretary, Sir Patrick Mayhew, that London had maintained contacts with the Irish Republican Army "for some years" -- this despite its repeated avowals it would never deal with such men of violence as these.
NEWS
By Padraig O'Malley | November 30, 1993
JUST two months ago, on the heels of the Israeli-Palestinian peace accord, predictions of an end to the 25-year struggle in Northern Ireland were widespread.A peace initiative led by the head of the Social Democratic and Labor Party, John Hume, and supported by Gerry Adams, leader of Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political wing, spurred further optimism.But such hopes are misplaced. A string of 23 deaths in eight days made October the worst month for casualties in Northern Ireland since June 1976.
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