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NEWS
May 2, 2006
George Yen, a retired engineer who served in the Republic of China's National Assembly for more than four decades, died of pneumonia April 23 at Mercy Medical Center. The Towson resident was 101. Family members said he was born in Imperial China and counted the philosopher Confucius among his ancestors. Mr. Yen graduated from what was then called Peiping University and earned a graduate engineering degree at the University of Ghent in Belgium. A civil engineer, he oversaw transportation in 10 of 35 Chinese provinces before and during World War II. He was a founder and former president of the regional carrier Far East Airlines, according to the family and a friend.
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NEWS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun reporter | October 28, 2007
Cal Ripken Jr. has developed a lucrative, baseball-centered career that includes stints as a television analyst, co-owner of a minor league team and a long list of other business interests since retiring from the Baltimore Orioles in 2002. But when he boards a plane at Washington Dulles International Airport today for his latest venture, he'll be carrying a batch of newly printed business cards. On one side of the small card his name appears in English, and on the back is a series of Chinese characters - an important tool for the newly appointed special envoy for the U.S. Department of State.
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NEWS
September 16, 1991
John King Fairbank, 84, the Harvard history professor who was widely credited with creating the field of modern Chinese studies in the United States and was a leading advocate of diplomatic recognition of the People's Republic of China, died of a heart attack Saturday in Cambridge, Mass. A towering figure in the field of Chinese studies, Mr. Fairbank left an indelible mark on scholarship and policy. He wrote and edited more than two dozen books, and had just completed his latest, "China: A New History."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2006
It might be the greatest diplomatic coup in history, and a historian at Towson University has told the inside story. That would be the 1972 trip by President Richard M. Nixon to what was then known as Red China. Steve Phillips, an associate professor at Towson, edited the just-published Volume XVII of Foreign Relations of the United States, which deals with the China initiative. This series of government publications is essentially a compilation of official documents that tells the official history of U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
By Yu Shuning | January 30, 1997
I AM WRITING to point out that your Jan. 25 editorial, ''The two China's two-China policy'' is contrary to the fact and therefore incorrect.As is known to all, there is but one China in the world, and Taiwan is an inalienable part of China. This is confirmed by the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 2758.The great majority of the countries in the world respect and abide by this resolution. The government of the United States recognizes that there is but one China, that Taiwan is part of China, and that the government of the People's Republic of China is the sole legal government of China.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 12, 2004
HONG KONG - Taiwanese voters rejected President Chen Shui-bian's aggressive approach to managing relations with China by not giving his party and its allies a majority in legislative elections yesterday. The stunning defeat for Chen's forces, which opinion polls had not predicted, is certain to lead to a reappraisal of the pace at which the president wants to carve out a national identity for Taiwan that is independent from China's. The results are certain to please China's leaders, who distrust Chen's intentions and have never renounced the threat to invade Taiwan should the island declare itself independent.
NEWS
April 30, 1993
China and the United States broke the diplomatic ice over a ping pong table. China and Taiwan accomplished the same thing this week over a conference table in Singapore.The result in the foreseeable future will be the same: closer working relationships between the communist rulers on the mainland and the remnants of its Kuomintang predecessor. Perhaps in time the "two Chinas" will be more or less reunited. Each denies that there are "two Chinas," and each agrees that Taiwan is Chinese. The dispute is over who rules them, and as the generations that fought each other in the '30s and '40s die off, that will become a pragmatic issue rather than the ideological and emotional one it is now.Actually China and Taiwan (which calls itself the Republic of China, as contrasted with the People's Republic of China on the mainland)
NEWS
October 22, 1990
WHAT DO selling watermelons on the Sabbath and drinking iced tea on a bus have in common?They violate the City Code and carry with them the stigma of misdemeanor and a fine.Here's another that goes unobserved: anyone who fails to clean the snow in front of a house or establishment within three hours of its falling (or, if it fell during the night, by 11 o'clock the next morning) is subject to a fine of $15 a day.Or, "If any person. . . shall place. . . in any street, lane or alley in the city, any barrel, hogshead, box, crate or other package, and shall suffer the same to remain for a longer time than twelve hours, or in any instance after nine o'clock in the evening, [he or she]
NEWS
By Young Chang | September 13, 1998
Iris Chang's personal yet universal stake in writing "The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II" reminds me of something Audre Lorde, a black lesbian feminist poet, wrote in an essay titled "The Transformation of Silence Into Language and Action." It is one of many essays in which Lorde addresses issues such as alienation, sexuality, racism and womanhood. "For we have been socialized to respect fear more than our own needs for language and definition, and while we wait in silence for that final luxury of fearlessness, the weight of that silence will choke us," Lorde wrote.
NEWS
By Lee Teng-hui | May 10, 1991
THE REPUBLIC of China is going through a rapid political transformation that will be no less dramatic in its consequences than the current transformation of Europe. Though this process may seem somewhat perplexing to some abroad, my countrymen and I know exactly what we are doing and where we are going.Democratization characterizes our present endeavor; reunification with mainland China is most certainly our future aim. These two goals are not unrelated.On May 1, the "Period of National Mobilization for the Suppression of Communist Rebellion" was officially terminated, allowing us to deal with mainland affairs on a more pragmatic basis.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
George Yen, a retired engineer who served in the Republic of China's National Assembly for more than four decades, died of pneumonia April 23 at Mercy Medical Center. The Towson resident was 101. Family members said he was born in Imperial China and counted the philosopher Confucius among his ancestors. Mr. Yen graduated from what was then called Peiping University and earned a graduate engineering degree at the University of Ghent in Belgium. A civil engineer, he oversaw transportation in 10 of 35 Chinese provinces before and during World War II. He was a founder and former president of the regional carrier Far East Airlines, according to the family and a friend.
NEWS
By PAUL RICHTER and PAUL RICHTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Chinese President Hu Jintao promised President Bush long-term economic reforms yesterday but offered no immediate concessions on the trade and security issues that threaten the two countries' relationship. Hailed with a 21-gun salute on a sunlit White House lawn, Hu declared that China was committed to overhauling gradually the export-driven economy that has piled up a $202 billion trade surplus with the United States and brought calls in Congress for protectionist retaliation.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 12, 2004
HONG KONG - Taiwanese voters rejected President Chen Shui-bian's aggressive approach to managing relations with China by not giving his party and its allies a majority in legislative elections yesterday. The stunning defeat for Chen's forces, which opinion polls had not predicted, is certain to lead to a reappraisal of the pace at which the president wants to carve out a national identity for Taiwan that is independent from China's. The results are certain to please China's leaders, who distrust Chen's intentions and have never renounced the threat to invade Taiwan should the island declare itself independent.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 15, 2004
TARAWA, Kiribati - Harry Tong was planning to run for president of this tiny republic in the middle of the Pacific, so of course he appreciated the gesture made by an official from Taiwan. As Tong remembers it, the official placed a black satchel filled with cash on the coffee table in front of him. It was late 2002, and Tong was meeting with a Taiwanese trade representative, Fu-tien Liu, whose government had expressed considerable interest in his presidential ambitions. Tong said Liu told him that the cash - $80,000, according to Tong's campaign manager - was a contribution to his campaign.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2002
MOSCOW - The Russian government reversed course yesterday and denied a visa to the Dalai Lama, complaining that the exiled Tibetan leader mixes politics with religion to a degree unacceptable to China - and, by extension, to Russia. "Evidence of this is, among other things, the inclusion in the delegation of members of the so-called Tibetan government-in-exile, artists and other figures," said Boris Malakhov, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry. The ministry had previously indicated that it would approve the visit, which would be the Dalai Lama's first full official visit since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2000
In a quiet experiment paid for by the Republic of China, a representative sample of Taiwanese pupils took the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program math and science tests each year from 1994 to 1998. The Chinese kids generally beat the socks off their Maryland counterparts in grades three, five and eight, especially in the higher grades. But that was almost beside the point, says state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick. The experiment's purpose wasn't to make international comparisons, Grasmick says.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | August 4, 1995
Taipei, Taiwan -- This is the little country that time forgot. It does not exist, at least as far as the United States is concerned.But it has turned out to be the little engine that could. The United States as mentor and model has no greater success story than Taiwan -- and no bigger embarrassment.For 50 years or more, we, the United States, have shown a certain genius for getting it wrong out here.For more than 25 years beginning in 1949, we supported and bankrolled a corrupt and inefficient police state that called itself the Republic of China and that claimed to be the true government of hundreds of millions of Chinese who had never seen or even heard of this island of 21 million people.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 31, 1995
Taipei, Taiwan -- Only a few months ago, peace seemed to be at hand in the three Chinas. On the mainland, the People's Republic of China was opening up economically, and it was assumed that political openness would follow the deaths of the last of the old men of the communist revolution that prevailed in 1949.Taiwan, the island the losing Nationalist Chinese proclaimed the Republic of China, had become the largest investor on the mainland, beginning to put together economically what had been torn asunder politically 46 years ago.And Hong Kong, the Chinese island leased to (or stolen by)
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Heather Dewar and Frank Langfitt and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1999
BEIJING -- One state's honorary citizen is another country's "evil mastermind."So it appeared last month after a polite gesture by the Baltimore mayor's office and the governor's office ignited rage in -- of all places -- the People's Republic of China.This year, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke named an official day for Chinese citizen Li Hongzhi, the leader of the spiritual meditation group Falun Gong. The governor's office gave Li an honorary state citizenship certificate. Ordinarily, such gestures of goodwill go unnoticed by the executives who proclaim them and most of the rest of the world.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 1999
BEIJING -- Each morning, Yang Deyong arrives for work in a white smock pushing a converted baby carriage filled with plastic combs, rusted shears and a folding metal stool.Standing in the November air, he chats with his customers as he carefully snips away, sending tufts of hair tumbling off a blue apron and onto the cold pavement. Fifteen minutes later, Yang's customers leave wearing a handsome haircut and a smile.Yang, 78, is among scores of outdoor haircutters who make their living by turning the street corners of Beijing into open-air barbershops.
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