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By Teara D. Quamina and Teara D. Quamina,Contributing Writer | March 12, 1998
As visitors enter through the huge double doors, they are greeted by a doorman who directs them into the intimate showroom. Twenty-four exhibits are encased in marble that extends from the floor to the high, arched ceilings and are protected by polished brass railings.Does this sound like a museum?Well, it is a living museum at the Reptile House in Druid Hill Park.It houses more than 500 amphibians and reptiles, including venomous snakes and poisonous frogs.For those preferring to wait out the initial excitement at the opening of the National Aquarium in Baltimore's "Venom: Striking Beauties" exhibit, the Reptile House offers an introduction to venomous reptiles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Teara D. Quamina and Teara D. Quamina,Contributing Writer | March 12, 1998
As visitors enter through the huge double doors, they are greeted by a doorman who directs them into the intimate showroom. Twenty-four exhibits are encased in marble that extends from the floor to the high, arched ceilings and are protected by polished brass railings.Does this sound like a museum?Well, it is a living museum at the Reptile House in Druid Hill Park.It houses more than 500 amphibians and reptiles, including venomous snakes and poisonous frogs.For those preferring to wait out the initial excitement at the opening of the National Aquarium in Baltimore's "Venom: Striking Beauties" exhibit, the Reptile House offers an introduction to venomous reptiles.
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By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
To the lions, tigers and bears, add a house full of snakes and lizards.Oh my!The Baltimore Zoo will reopen the Reptile House on Friday after an extensive renovation, and it has begun work on a major new exhibit planned to open next year -- a chimpanzee habitat.The Reptile House was built in 1938 and housed aquarium exhibits for the first 10 years of its existence. Reptiles replaced fish in 1948. It was a casual era in Druid Hill Park when only the animals -- and not the zoo grounds -- were enclosed by fences.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
To the lions, tigers and bears, add a house full of snakes and lizards.Oh my!The Baltimore Zoo will reopen the Reptile House on Friday after an extensive renovation, and it has begun work on a major new exhibit planned to open next year -- a chimpanzee habitat.The Reptile House was built in 1938 and housed aquarium exhibits for the first 10 years of its existence. Reptiles replaced fish in 1948. It was a casual era in Druid Hill Park when only the animals -- and not the zoo grounds -- were enclosed by fences.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
A 17-year-old Baltimore youth has pleaded guilty to murdering and robbing a school teacher to get money to buy cocaine.With his mother sobbing in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, Derrick Antonio Allbrook entered his guilty plea before Judge Ellen M. Heller. The state is recommending life plus 20 years when he is sentenced Jan. 20.Allbrook, of the 5100 block of Nelson Ave., had turned down the plea offer earlier yesterday. But his lawyer, Elizabeth Julian, returned two hours later and told the judge her client had "changed his mind" after consulting with his family and her.The plea involved the robbery and slaying of Jerome C. McDaniel, 46, a teacher at Ashburton Elementary School, Oct. 20, 1989.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
A prosecutor has painted Timothy M. Jones, 20, as the man who set into motion the slaying of a Baltimore schoolteacher by allegedly supplying the murder weapon."
NEWS
October 11, 2000
Do you know? What is the name of the tortoise's shell? Answer: The carapace is the name of the shell that covers the animal's back, and the plastron covers its belly. Learn more! Visit the Egyptian tortoises at The Baltimore Zoo Reptile House. Read "Clever Tortoise" by Francesca Martin. 1. Egyptian tortoises can no longer be found in Egypt. 2. Egyptian tortoises lay one or two eggs at a time in nests three inches deep in sand.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | September 12, 2001
FOREST FROGS Tomato frogs are only found in Madagascar, an island nation to the west of Africa, mainly in forest areas. The adults can grow pretty big! Males can be 2 1/2 inches in lenght while females can be 3 to 4 inches long. Their colors range from reddish-orange to dark red. What's for dinner? Crickets, worms and even mice! Do you know? Are tomato frogs poisonous? Answer: They are not toxic but can give off a very sticky white mucus that can be irritating to human eyes. Learn more!
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
A prosecutor has painted Timothy M. Jones, 20, as the man who set into motion the slaying of a Baltimore schoolteacher by allegedly supplying the murder weapon."
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
A 17-year-old Baltimore youth has pleaded guilty to murdering and robbing a school teacher to get money to buy cocaine.With his mother sobbing in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, Derrick Antonio Allbrook entered his guilty plea before Judge Ellen M. Heller. The state is recommending life plus 20 years when he is sentenced Jan. 20.Allbrook, of the 5100 block of Nelson Ave., had turned down the plea offer earlier yesterday. But his lawyer, Elizabeth Julian, returned two hours later and told the judge her client had "changed his mind" after consulting with his family and her.The plea involved the robbery and slaying of Jerome C. McDaniel, 46, a teacher at Ashburton Elementary School, Oct. 20, 1989.
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