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By Sports Digest | March 10, 2010
The NCAA has given Maryland and Texas a one-year reprieve from a new rule that limits off-campus football recruiting by a coach designated as the head coach-in-waiting. That will allow Maryland offensive coordinator James Franklin and Texas defensive coordinator Will Muschamp to fully participate in the spring evaluation period in April and May. The new rule says coaches "publicly designated" to be the next head coach are bound by the same recruiting rules as the current head coach.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Board of Elections determined Republican Larry Hogan broke a campaign finance rule, but the panel agreed Thursday to waive the fine associated with the minor infraction. Elections officials cleared Hogan of wrongdoing in two of three charges leveled against him by the Maryland Democratic Party this summer. In the third charge, officials determined Hogan violated campaign-finance rules by not paying his advocacy group, Change Maryland, for a poll the group sold to his campaign.
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NEWS
February 3, 2014
It doesn't take a doctor to diagnose Fix-is-in Disease, the condition common to politicians who look out for favored individuals. In the recent outbreak in Annapolis, the warning signs are too painfully obvious for most anyone to ignore. Last week, the chairmen to the two committees with oversight of Maryland's woeful health care exchange announced they'll wait for state auditors to look into the matter this summer rather than proceeding with their own investigation during the current legislative session.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
It doesn't take a doctor to diagnose Fix-is-in Disease, the condition common to politicians who look out for favored individuals. In the recent outbreak in Annapolis, the warning signs are too painfully obvious for most anyone to ignore. Last week, the chairmen to the two committees with oversight of Maryland's woeful health care exchange announced they'll wait for state auditors to look into the matter this summer rather than proceeding with their own investigation during the current legislative session.
FEATURES
February 14, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer will issue a reprieve today for Marylanders who forgot Valentine's Day -- or were too hemmed in by ice to deal with hearts and flowers.Citing severe weather that has wreaked havoc on floral deliveries and gift-buying efforts, Mr. Schaefer said he will issue a Valentine's Day proclamation extending the holiday through next Sunday."We should help Maryland's florists . . . and any romantics who might not have been able to do their Valentine shopping," the governor said.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | October 18, 2001
IT LOOKED LIKE the alumni association of our youth. Two by two the old buffaloes marched out Tuesday night, listening to the cheers on Memorial Stadium Night in a suburban country club dining room the way they'd once heard them at an old, vanished ballpark on 33rd Street. "Mike Flanagan and Scott McGregor," said Fred Manfra, the Orioles radio announcer, his voice instantly drowned out by several hundred folks who'd ducked in out of the evening's rain and gathered to benefit the Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 22, 2008
The U.S. women's softball team lost the gold-medal game to Japan, 3-1, after it hadn't lost an Olympic softball game since the 2000 Games. In fact, in running up an 8-0 record on their way to yesterday's game against Japan, the Americans had actually beaten Japan, 4-1, in extra innings Wednesday in a semifinal game that forced the Japanese to play Australia, with the winner advancing to the final and the loser getting the bronze medal. Japan prevailed against Australia, which gave the team new life in what amounted to a rematch with the U.S. Unfortunately for the Americans, there was no reprieve for them after their first loss.
NEWS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | April 6, 1996
SEATTLE -- The rapacious California sea lions of Seattle's Ballard Locks have slipped the noose.The five animals, which have been under a federal death sentence for almost a month, may find themselves in sunny Florida, where they will be the object of adoring tourists at Sea World in Orlando.In a deal that involved Vice President Al Gore, Sea World says it will put the five male sea lions in an exhibit with similar animals.All that remains for the reprieved sea lions is to be captured. One sea lion has not been seen all year and another for weeks.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 2, 2000
A family in Baltimore's witness protection program avoided homelessness yesterday after city prosecutors decided to pay for them to stay another night at a motel so they could look for a new house, officials said. Toyquan Matthews, her husband and their six children were told around midday yesterday that prosecutors would pick up the tab for another night. Matthews looked for a place to rent in Baltimore yesterday afternoon. Matthews, whose family was twice threatened by friends of a man facing an attempted murder trial, has been staying in the motel for 2 1/2 months.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | January 30, 1991
The city's rat eradication program won a last-minute reprieve today, as the city Board of Estimates voted to eliminate fewer than half of the jobs originally slated to be cut from the program.The board today voted to eliminate 19 housing inspector jobs from the Department of Housing and Community Development, the result of a $1.1 million state budget cut ordered in December.While city officials bemoaned that reduction, they said the loss is far better than the 45 inspector jobs that originally were expected to be eliminated because of the state cuts.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The owners of the Shanty Grille restaurant in Ellicott City breathed a sigh of relief when the Obama administration delayed for a year penalties on businesses that do not provide health insurance to employees. For months, they fretted about how they were going to cover more workers as required by the Affordable Care Act. The family-owned restaurant with about 85 workers now offers insurance to 11 employees but would have to cover about 30 more when the act is fully implemented in January, said Eric King, Shanty Grille's vice president.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
A bill moving through the General Assembly would give Maryland farmers a 10-year reprieve from new state or local environmental regulations if the state Department of Agriculture deems they're doing their part to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. To get the deal, farmers would first have to reduce pollution from their land more quickly than is now required – an important point, supporters say, since farm runoff is the largest contributor to the bay's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts, For The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
First off, big thanks to Diane Trap for filling in for me Monday night. I only had the one Manhattan , but then there was the glass of wine... and one never wants to recap under the influence. Or maybe one does, but only in a more measured way in the privacy of one's own home. Tonight we start with a jazzy routine choreographed by Jason Gilkinson and danced by the pros and the troupe. First we see Dorothy's routine being called a mess, which she readily agrees with. Then Carrie Ann hits her head on her own arm, bouncing off her spiked bracelet, then worrying about whether said bracelet has put a hole in her head.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
It would be easier for Robin Small if she could simply give away cats from time to time. Or birds. Or dogs. Or ferrets. Or anything else adoptable that finds its way into Anne Arundel County Animal Control. "We, unfortunately, sometimes have to perform euthanasia," said Small, who runs the county shelter. She nuzzled a gray short-hair cat named Chile, a five-month resident of a small room crammed with 50 cat cages that seem to be constantly full. "There's no limit to how long she can stay," Small said, even though the shelter is again at capacity.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
When Sarita Santillan moved from Peru to Maryland with her family in 2003, she was just 11 years old — and had little clue how hard it would be to stay here. This week, Santillan, 20, an illegal immigrant who lives in Greektown, will be among more than a million undocumented residents who are expected to apply for a reprieve from deportation. The new program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is being offered by the Obama administration starting Wednesday. "I should be able to work and help pay my way through college now. This is a wonderful opportunity for me and for others like me," said Santillan, a 2009 graduate of Digital Harbor High.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2012
A federal judge on Friday stopped Baltimore's housing agency from terminating an agreement with a private developer that wants to revitalize 14 acres of West Baltimore. U.S. District Judge Richard D. Bennett issued a preliminary injunction that prevents Baltimore Housing from ending its relationship with La Cite Development LLC, a New York-based developer that contracted with the city in 2006 to build residences and commercial space in run-down blocks of the Poppleton neighborhood.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Hundreds of Maryland residents targeted to lose their disability and medical assistance payments have won a temporary reprieve in federal court in Baltimore, where lawyers for the poor and the government have settled a class action lawsuit.The settlement, reached late last week, requires the Social Security Administration to re-examine the cases of 842 Maryland residents that were scheduled to lose their benefits under a tough new federal law passed by Congress last year.The settlement is not expected to have an impact on cases pending outside the state.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
The debt-ridden City Life Museums won a conditional cash reprieve from the mayor yesterday that will prevent the institution from closing.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said he will give the museum $1 million over the next two years but only after the museum can raise an equal amount from private and business donors.The news comes a week after the museum officials laid off seven employees, drastically reduced operating hours and closed some exhibits to stem a growing $2.5 million debt."City Life is on the road to a very healthy recovery," Schmoke said yesterday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Julius Henson, the former political consultant sentenced to 60 days in jail last month for writing a 2010 Election Day robocall that prosecutors said was designed to suppress black votes, has requested his immediate release so that he can visit his elderly mother before she dies. Henson's attorney, Edward Smith Jr., was advised Monday night that Mary Henson had been admitted to the critical care unit of Good Samaritan Hospital in New York, where she was forced to move to live with her daughter after her son, whom she'd previously lived with, was incarcerated, according to court documents.
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