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Repression

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NEWS
By Frank P.L. Somerville and Frank P.L. Somerville,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
The Baltimore City Council passed a resolution last night condemning Pakistan for "the systematic repression" of the Ahmadis, a minority Muslim sect teaching that Jesus "was a holy prophet who survived the cross and preached in India after his resurrection."A spokesman for the Pakistan Embassy in Washington denied the repression but said such a belief in Christ would not be possible for a true Muslim. Pakistan is a Muslim country.The resolution was introduced by council President Mary Pat Clarke at the request of a group of Ahmadiyya Muslims in Balti- more.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
When Emily Parker started writing columns about China and the Internet for the Wall Street Journal in 2004, she was skeptical that fledgling social media sites could make much of an impact. "I wasn't convinced that the Internet was going to be transformative," she said during a recent interview. (An edited transcript of that conversation appears below.) "I thought, 'OK, a little information will get past the censors. But, is that really going to change China?' " Over the next decade, Parker slowly became a believer, as canny Chinese "netizens" publicized information that the government wanted suppressed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN BOOK EDITOR | September 12, 2004
Journey from the Land of No, by Roya Hakakian. Crown. 245 pages. $23. The transcendent poignancy of Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl lies in the coming-of-age story of a teen-ager against the backdrop of a gathering, obliterating evil force. In Anne, we recognize all the yearnings, petulance and wonder of a talented adolescent, knowing all the time that this precious bulb is doomed never to realize her full blossoming. Roya Hakakian, fortunately, avoids Anne's fate by safely emigrating to America with her family, but her story too is about the stunting of a vibrant young woman who, like Anne, stands in awe as she catches a glimpse of all the vast potential within herself precisely at the exact moment when an oppressive, annihilating regime makes her self-actualization impossible.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Carrying protest signs in English and Spanish, opponents of the Venezuelan government rallied peacefully Saturday at the World Trade Center in Baltimore in solidarity with demonstrations in the South American country against the administration of President Nicolas Maduro. About 80 people had gathered by early afternoon, standing in a circle in front of the building hoisting the country's yellow, blue and red flag, chanting anti-government slogans and listening to Venezuelan folk songs on a boom box. The demonstration was meant to coincide with others taking place in 70 cities around the world to bring international pressure on Maduro's government, which opponents blame for political repression, rampant crime and shortages of basic goods.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 1996
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Hours after the Colombian Congress earlier this month cleared President Ernesto Samper of ties to drug traffickers, he vowed to spearhead a movement for national reconciliation.Yet many Colombians fear that "reconciliation" is a code word for whitewash and even repression by an administration determined stay in power despite evidence that the 1994 presidential campaign was financed by millions of dollars in drug money.Repression may not even be needed if jaded Colombians simply allow Samper to remain in office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 5, 1993
"The Remains of the Day," the powerful new Merchant-Ivory film that opens today at the Senator, is about the remains of the soul. What's left after a lifetime spent locked in the clammy grip of that most human of failings, the force called repression"The Remains of the Day," the powerful new Merchant-Ivory film that opens today at the Senator, is about the remains of the soul. What's left after a lifetime spent locked in the clammy grip of that most human of failings, the force called repression?
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | January 30, 1994
Something is going on in today's movies. Or, more precisely, something is not going on.In "The Age of Innocence," Michelle Pfeiffer and Daniel Day-Lewis are riding in a carriage, their unspoken passion throbbing in cadence with the horse's hoofs. Suddenly, Mr. Day-Lewis does something shocking. He unbuttons Ms. Pfeiffer's tightly knit glove and kisses her wrist.In "Shadowlands," Anthony Hopkins and Debra Winger seek refuge from a rainstorm in an empty barn. They embrace, and she reaches under his sport coat to caress his back.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Carrying protest signs in English and Spanish, opponents of the Venezuelan government rallied peacefully Saturday at the World Trade Center in Baltimore in solidarity with demonstrations in the South American country against the administration of President Nicolas Maduro. About 80 people had gathered by early afternoon, standing in a circle in front of the building hoisting the country's yellow, blue and red flag, chanting anti-government slogans and listening to Venezuelan folk songs on a boom box. The demonstration was meant to coincide with others taking place in 70 cities around the world to bring international pressure on Maduro's government, which opponents blame for political repression, rampant crime and shortages of basic goods.
TOPIC
By Frank Langfitt | September 24, 2000
ON THE Great Wall, China - China is the kind of country where you can camp on the Great Wall without a permit, but if you sit down in Tiananmen Square you might get a kick in the head. Earlier this summer I went strolling through the square with my college roommates, Dan and Dave, who were visiting from California. As we walked around the vast expanse of concrete, the nation's political epicenter, police descended on clumps of simply dressed Chinese. They were members of the banned spiritual meditation group, Falun Gong, quietly demonstrating against a government crackdown in which tens of thousands of their comrades have been detained.
NEWS
March 28, 1998
THE CONTACT group of six powers gave a weak ultimatum to Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic to end repression of the Albanian majority in Kosovo province: End brutality in a month or the world community would impose sanctions specified in an earlier ultimatum.Mr. Milosevic was not impressed. He gives in only to credible threats. In this case, the resolve of the United States and Britain were not enough to overcome the resistance of Russia, France, Germany and Italy.A let-up of police repression and talks with the shadow Albanian government in Kosovo might defuse the crisis.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 2, 2013
When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative? The Afghan constitution contains language that supposedly protects women's rights, and Afghanistan has signed several international human rights treaties that guarantee protection for women.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2008
MOSCOW - Nobel laureate Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the reclusive icon of the Russian intelligentsia and chronicler of communist repression, has died of heart failure, Russian news agencies reported. He was 89. Stephan Solzhenitsyn told the Associated Press his father died late yesterday, but he declined to comment further. The soulful writer and spiritual father of Russia's nationalist patriotic movement lived to be reunited with his beloved homeland after two decades of exile - only to be as distressed by communism's damage to the Russian character as he was by his earlier forced estrangement from the land and people he loved.
NEWS
By Maria Allwine | July 22, 2008
As one of the members of the Baltimore Pledge of Resistance who has been spied on by the Maryland State Police, I feel it important that people understand we in the Pledge of Resistance are the most peaceful, nonterrorist-type folks you could ever hope to meet. We are committed to raising awareness about the destructive forces of violence in our society and our country, which is one of the reasons we have protested the invasion of Iraq since before it occurred. It is because we love and value this country so much that we work to make it better, and we start by insisting that those in power obey its laws.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | October 20, 2007
Washington -- President Bush reached further into his administration's limited arsenal of sanctions to apply against Myanmar yesterday by targeting additional senior officials and supporters. He also called on China and India to join international efforts to promote human rights and democracy in the military-run Southeast Asian nation formerly called Burma. With his wife, Laura, who has taken a very public interest in the nation's political conditions, at his side, Bush said, "The people of Burma are showing great courage in the face of immense repression.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | October 17, 2006
They said the grass would start growing soon. For a while the newly planted patch probably will remain distinct from the surrounding field, then its borders will fade over time, and eventually, the outline of where the little yellow schoolhouse stood, and where it was so horribly violated, will be no longer be distinguishable from the surrounding field. Meanwhile, about 150 miles to the northeast, another scarred piece of land remains an open wound. Five years after terrorists struck the World Trade Center and killed nearly 3,000 people, the site remains a yawning abyss, drawing both grievers and gawkers.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | May 19, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- The disconnect between President Bush's public push for Mideast democracy and developments in the region was in full view last week in Washington and Cairo. Last Friday, Gamal Mubarak, the son of Egypt's president and thus his presumed heir, was welcomed by Mr. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney at the White House. The younger Mr. Mubarak is supposedly spearheading democratic reforms within his father's political party. But the day before Mr. Mubarak's White House confab, police in Cairo beat demonstrators protesting the punishment of two reform-minded Egyptian judges.
NEWS
March 29, 1991
Russia has a history of and a gut instinct for the authoritarian. When all else fails, or when you think it is going to fail, or you think that perhaps it might fail, or you just don't know, go for the iron fist.This philosophy kept the czars in power for a long time and the communists for a lesser time, and now the fading sometimes-liberalizing communists are trying to prolong their mandate by reversing course back to their basics, repression.Banning demonstrations in Moscow is just the latest example, though it is a good one, an attempt to parry several problems in one ill-conceived stroke.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 4, 1991
MOSCOW -- In the dank tunnels beneath the KGB headquarters lie the moldering documents, perhaps ruined by seepage or soiled by rat droppings, that could explain to Vladimir Yanin why he was arrested at 16 as "the son of an enemy of the people" and why his stepfather was shot.At least, that is what Yanin dares to hope, now that the KGB files on the millions who fell victim to Josef Stalin's brutal dictatorship are about to be opened."We need the archives to know the truth," the vigorous pensioner with a shock of white hair said yesterday.
NEWS
By TRACY WILKINSON and TRACY WILKINSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 14, 2006
DIYARBAKIR, Turkey -- When the Turkish government lifted its ban on the letter "W," it seemed like a breakthrough. After decades of repression of Kurdish ethnic identity and a deadly war with separatist rebels, the Islamist-led government made moves toward democratic reform in recent years, part of Turkey's bid to improve its chances of joining the European Union. Letters that appear in the Kurdish alphabet but not the Turkish one were no longer banned from print. Emergency military rule was lifted.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Iranian writer Azar Nafisi believes in using the power of imagination to change women's lives. Her best-selling book, Reading Lolita in Tehran, tells the story of a clandestine book group Nafisi held at her own home in defiance of government book bans. The literature she shared with her seven female students - works by Vladimir Nabokov, Jane Austen, Henry James, F. Scott Fitzgerald - offered temporary escape and perspective on the totalitarian regime in which they were living. Inside their teacher's home, the young women shed their veils and gained a new way of perceiving themselves as well as the fundamentalism oppressing them.
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