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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- The Orioles met with the representatives of free-agent outfielder/first baseman Nick Swisher tonight, an industry source has confirmed. Orioles executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette said earlier today that he spoke with six player agents today. Among those were the representatives of Swisher, outfielder Nate Schierholtz and pitcher Kevin Correia. The team also met with the representatives to former Orioles Nate McLouth and Joe Saunders for the first time here at the Winter Meetings.
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NEWS
By Donald Boesch and Edward Maibach | September 25, 2014
George Mason University research, released jointly with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, shows that roughly three quarters of Marylanders understand that climate change is a threat to our health, homes, businesses and natural resources, and more than half of them support state initiatives to address the problem. Now, with elections less than two months away, it's time to ensure we continue to move forward. Maryland is highly vulnerable, with more than 3,000 miles of coastline.
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NEWS
August 5, 2011
In her book, "Ratification, The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788," Pauline Maier notes that during the debate for ratification of the United States constitution in Massachusetts (as reported in the American Herald during the convention), the good people of Massachusetts elected "perhaps one of the compleatest representations of interests and sentiments of their constituents that ever were assembled. " One heated debate arose over the two-year term length for representatives, some feeling it was too long for them to be in office "without going back to the people for reelection.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Now that the NFL and the NFL Players Association have implemented human growth hormone testing as part of a revised performance-enhancing drug policy, Ravens veteran defensive end Chris Canty is hoping that ensures a level playing field. As the Ravens' player union representative, Canty voted in favor of the policy. The changes include a suspension of four games without pay for a first violation, a 10-game suspension without pay for a second violation and a minimum two-year ban for a third violation.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
The Orioles remain interested in free-agent relief pitcher John Axford as the potential replacement for closer Jim Johnson. The team met with Axford's representatives at Major League Baseball's winter meetings in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., this week, according to a source. Axford, 30, split the 2013 season between the Milwaukee Brewers and St. Louis Cardinals. He was 7-7 with a 4.02 ERA in 75 games overall. Previously, he was the closer for the Brewers and had 105 saves between 2010 and 2012.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment on his blog, You Don't Say, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: RODOMONTADE As the deliberations of the Senate and House of Representatives of the 111th Congress begin to face, mercifully, from memory, you will probably retain some sense of having listened to rodomontade.
NEWS
February 7, 2011
Our Congress passed a law in 2010 called "Healthy, Hungry Kids Act. " This act was to pay for food for children who were not receiving sufficient nutrition to be healthy. It was so popular and apparently worthy that it passed in the Senate by a unanimous vote. Yet in the House of Representatives, 157 members voted against it. Obviously some representatives would vote against the best of legislation to avoid cooperating with the other party. This is a major sign of the failure of our Congress.
BUSINESS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2001
The Maryland attorney general issued a cease and desist order Wednesday to shut down an Internet site that advertises itself as a "shopping mall" but which officials say is an illegal pyramid scheme. The order, filed with the Maryland securities commissioner, seeks to shut down Powercard International Inc. of Daphne, Ala., which does business under the name ECB4U. Powercard International can contest the order before an administrative law judge within 15 days, officials said. Gerald P. Nehra, a Michigan lawyer representing the company, said Powercard's business "is legal under Maryland and U.S. laws."
NEWS
March 9, 2011
The Sun's recent article on the dollar coin ("Dollar for dollar, a big savings," March 8), documents a prime example of where our government has taken a wrong turn. As pointed out in the article, the savings accrued from eliminating the paper dollar bill and replacing it with a more durable dollar coin is significant. Budget-conscious representatives of the people should consider this a "no-brainer. " What could be stopping them? Lobbyists from the paper and ink providers have consistently influenced representatives to drop the subject.
NEWS
December 17, 2011
I am a small business owner. I employ 18 people, all of whom live in and support our local communities. I have always paid their health insurance, which was up 14 percent in 2010 and 22 percent in 2011, but I cannot continue this for much longer. I create jobs. I do not have tax loopholes provided by our representatives, and I certainly don't take jobs out of the country. If I fail, after 60 years, nobody will bail me out with your tax dollars. I have no funds for lobbyists to pressure representatives into special advantages for my business.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A law professor who is teaching Maryland's public defenders to better serve their poor clients amid "crushing" caseloads is among the winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grants. As founder of the Atlanta-based organization Gideon's Promise, Jonathan Rapping works to train public defenders and help reform what he considers civil rights abuses in the criminal justice system. He arrived in Baltimore in May for a year-long stint at the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, his first attempt at changing a statewide system.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
- In the heart of this town on the old U.S. National Road in Western Maryland, a woman leans on the front desk of an 1890s-era hotel, her face a study in mixed emotions. Tina Storey loves her work as office manager of Failinger's Hotel Gunter, the grande dame of lodging in Frostburg with its polished oak staircase, Victorian settees and zillions of artifacts and displays that evoke the history of the so-called "Mountain Side of Maryland. " But she's still grieving the woman who revived the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore children's book author Elisabeth Dahl used to walk two or three miles just so she could hang out at the Library of Congress, reveling in the Paris Opera House style-architecture, the 23-karat gold-plated dome and the breathtakingly extensive archives that includes the personal papers of Thomas Jefferson. Dahl married a librarian who works now at Towson University, and the couple celebrated their wedding in the Enoch Pratt Free Library . So 45-year-old writer couldn't be more thrilled that her first published book, a children's novel called "Genie Wishes," was chosen to represent the State of Maryland at the 14 t h annual Library of Congress National Book Festival on Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
At the Target in Baltimore's Mondawmin Mall, megaphone-shaped "college" signs hang over aisles stocked with must-haves for students living on their own, such as mini-refrigerators, desk lamps and six-packs of ramen noodles. "Back to College" is a well-stocked department at Target and many other stores this time of year. It's no wonder. The college market represents the biggest chunk of back-to-school shopping, which itself is the second-biggest season for retailers after the holiday season.
NEWS
By Anne Colt Leitess | August 19, 2014
Editor's note: This article has been updated from an earlier version Criminal trials typically end once the jury returns its verdict. The attorneys move on to their next cases, unless appeal is pursued, and the debate ends. Unfortunately, that has not been the case after the recent trial of State v. Joseph Walker in Anne Arundel County. An Anne Arundel County grand jury indicted the defendant in this case for murder and other offenses after a Maryland State Police investigation revealed strong evidence that the defendant shot and killed an unarmed man during a road rage incident.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
IRVINE, Calif. - Though he has swum four meets since his return to competition, Michael Phelps will gain a truer gauge of his form this week at U.S. Nationals. The event, which begins Wednesday and runs through Sunday, will bring together the nation's best swimmers as they vie for spots in the 2015 FINA World Championships in Kazan, Russia. Analysts will have their eyes on Phelps, not only to see how he fares against world-class competition but to glean a hint of which events he hopes to swim at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
NEWS
November 23, 1990
Phil M. Landrum, a Georgian who served in Congress for a quarter-century and helped write landmark legislation intended to curb union corruption, died Monday of congestive heart failure at a hospital in Jasper, Ga. He was 83 and lived in Jasper. A Democrat, Mr. Landrum was elected to the House of Representatives from Georgia's 9th Congressional District in 1952 and served until he retired in 1977.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 30, 2013
Personal representatives of estates watch out! The Maryland comptroller is warning that a business calling itself IRFS in Annapolis is claiming to be collecting debts on behalf of the state. The business is sending out notices to personal representatives, saying the estate is delinquent on taxes. The comptroller said the business asks for unpaid taxes and interest, plus it sends a payment coupon for the alleged tax liability. Not only that, the notice tells representatives to take out a loan to pay off the debt or otherwise face a lien on the bank account or a garnishment of wages.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
I have read many articles about Michael Peroutka, the Anne Arundel County Council candidate for District 5 ( "Hogan, GOP concerned about Arundel candidate's ties to secessionist group," July 25). These articles are mostly made up of name-calling, rumors and other allegations without any evidence or sources other than the Southern Poverty Law Center, which is a tainted source at best. Where are the articles that actually include facts? Where are the supposed exposes on the other candidates?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Atholton High School's Miles Walker recently captured the state's top prize in an American Legion national government instruction program, an accomplishment that for the 16-year-old rising senior was nearly a lifetime in the making. The Columbia resident was an infant when his mother, Lisa Walker Woodyard, first read about the Boys State program in the memoir of President Bill Clinton, who attended as a 16-year-old himself. The regimented instruction program was launched by the American Legion in 1935 to counter the Soviet Union's Young Pioneer camps and according to the American Legion strives to teach civic duty via role playing as state and local politicians.
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