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By Ellen O. Moyer | January 20, 2008
I am amazed that Alderman Richard Israel, who has spent most of his career as a lawyer in the office of the attorney general, would begin 2008 with an assault on representative government as he does with Charter Amendment CA-01-08. Article IV, Section 2A and Article 5, Section 1 of the proposed amendment muzzle the aldermen and mayor by making any direction to city employees relative to policy an action of misconduct subject to recall. This is a gag rule that renders null and void the vote of the public for representative government.
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NEWS
By Ellen O. Moyer | January 20, 2008
I am amazed that Alderman Richard Israel, who has spent most of his career as a lawyer in the office of the attorney general, would begin 2008 with an assault on representative government as he does with Charter Amendment CA-01-08. Article IV, Section 2A and Article 5, Section 1 of the proposed amendment muzzle the aldermen and mayor by making any direction to city employees relative to policy an action of misconduct subject to recall. This is a gag rule that renders null and void the vote of the public for representative government.
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NEWS
November 7, 1996
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY voters thumbed their noses at representative government on Election Day, stripping leaders of their most important power -- the ability to levy taxes. Voters not only refused to repeal a restrictive property tax cap that, after 18 years, is making it impossible for P.G. government to keep up with demands for basic services; they approved a measure forcing any tax or fee increase to referendum.This is government by plebiscite, not representative democracy as defined by the Founders.
NEWS
May 16, 2000
AFTER MONTHS of embarrassing turmoil, Columbians may now engage in a period of creative statecraft. The task could be easy or onerous -- the heavy lifting of incorporation or a few minor adjustments, bylaw changes and the like. Ideally, the city would have a leader in place to guide this process and then to assume control of it. But the Columbia Association's former president, Deborah O. McCarty, departed recently in a cloud of controversy. The newly elected Columbia Council must therefore assume leadership in this endeavor.
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | June 5, 1991
KUWAIT'S ruling al Sabah family was notably generous with its political promises after it was driven into exile last August by Iraq's invasion. The assurances were virtually non-stop that the emir and other top leaders would assure that post-liberation Kuwait could look forward to a new political order based on more representative government.Now, after the tremendously costly U.N.-led intervention to free Kuwait from the invading Iraqis, that pledge so far remains unredeemed.Now the emir says merely that new parliamentary elections are indeed planned, but not for another 16 months.
NEWS
May 16, 2000
AFTER MONTHS of embarrassing turmoil, Columbians may now engage in a period of creative statecraft. The task could be easy or onerous -- the heavy lifting of incorporation or a few minor adjustments, bylaw changes and the like. Ideally, the city would have a leader in place to guide this process and then to assume control of it. But the Columbia Association's former president, Deborah O. McCarty, departed recently in a cloud of controversy. The newly elected Columbia Council must therefore assume leadership in this endeavor.
NEWS
By Joseph N. Ingolia | November 3, 1990
VOTERS in Baltimore County will have the opportunity Tuesday to vote on whether there should be a 2 percent yearly limitation on property-tax increases. While the question appears to be a purely local issue, nothing could be further from the truth. The issue springs from the same country-wide dissatisfaction that threatens incumbents and a non-responsive political system.The history of Question T is a script for a book on how not to represent people. The question is sponsored by Citizens For Representative Government, a group that at first was more interested in people being properly represented than in protesting taxes.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer could hardly do a better job of inviting the legislature to undermine the powers of his office. By preventing senior officials from testifying before legislative committees, he is starting a battle he can't win.It was bad enough that he prohibited state employees from talking to reporters without first clearing the queries through his office. That was silly and self-defeating, since he and his staff would soon be doing nothing else. Now he is striking at the heart of representative government, and he will inevitably come up the loser.
NEWS
April 12, 1994
As expressed in this space previously, the Columbia Association suffers from a major-league identity crisis. Often, Columbia representatives seem to like it that way, casting CA in whatever light seems most convenient at the moment. CA is the ginsu knife of homeowner associations: It's a private business. It's a non-profit. It's a government body. It's a civic association.In fairness, there does seem to be some genuine concern about defining Columbia and encouraging greater resident participation in its affairs.
NEWS
By ANDREW CIOFALO | April 3, 1992
A cynical mood pervades the country. The electorate, having failed a major test in lip reading last time around, is not prepared to listen to renewed blandishments from candidates. The safest and wisest course may be not to choose at all, as Ralph Nader would have us do.His proposal for a ''none of the above'' option on all ballots reflects a general frustration with a political process that regularly serves up lip-service establishment candidates. However, the negative option vote could create a rolling blockade of disaffected voters who would in effect reject all government as unsafe at any speed.
NEWS
November 7, 1996
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY voters thumbed their noses at representative government on Election Day, stripping leaders of their most important power -- the ability to levy taxes. Voters not only refused to repeal a restrictive property tax cap that, after 18 years, is making it impossible for P.G. government to keep up with demands for basic services; they approved a measure forcing any tax or fee increase to referendum.This is government by plebiscite, not representative democracy as defined by the Founders.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Congress struggled for months and months to pass two welfare-reform bills. The president vetoed both. Then, after strife and controversy, as well as compromise on both sides, the Congress passed and the president signed a welfare-reform bill.Historic, everyone intoned. For the first time since the 1930s, a federal entitlement had been eliminated. A new era in American history had begun, right?Not so fast. Just because 75 percent of the population wants welfare reform, and their elected representatives have enacted it, does not mean it happens.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 18, 1994
Washington.--Peter Edelman is for President Clinton one debacle that need not happen. The 1994 elections made inevitable many 1995 conflicts with Capitol Hill, but the elections also will have prevented one if because of them Clinton decides not to nominate Mr. Edelman, a Georgetown University law professor, to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. That is the court from which one-third of today's Supreme Court (Justices Scalia, Thomas and Ginsburg) came.President Clinton purportedly was startled to learn, rather late, the contents of Lani Guinier's writings.
NEWS
April 12, 1994
As expressed in this space previously, the Columbia Association suffers from a major-league identity crisis. Often, Columbia representatives seem to like it that way, casting CA in whatever light seems most convenient at the moment. CA is the ginsu knife of homeowner associations: It's a private business. It's a non-profit. It's a government body. It's a civic association.In fairness, there does seem to be some genuine concern about defining Columbia and encouraging greater resident participation in its affairs.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer could hardly do a better job of inviting the legislature to undermine the powers of his office. By preventing senior officials from testifying before legislative committees, he is starting a battle he can't win.It was bad enough that he prohibited state employees from talking to reporters without first clearing the queries through his office. That was silly and self-defeating, since he and his staff would soon be doing nothing else. Now he is striking at the heart of representative government, and he will inevitably come up the loser.
NEWS
By ANDREW CIOFALO | April 3, 1992
A cynical mood pervades the country. The electorate, having failed a major test in lip reading last time around, is not prepared to listen to renewed blandishments from candidates. The safest and wisest course may be not to choose at all, as Ralph Nader would have us do.His proposal for a ''none of the above'' option on all ballots reflects a general frustration with a political process that regularly serves up lip-service establishment candidates. However, the negative option vote could create a rolling blockade of disaffected voters who would in effect reject all government as unsafe at any speed.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 18, 1994
Washington.--Peter Edelman is for President Clinton one debacle that need not happen. The 1994 elections made inevitable many 1995 conflicts with Capitol Hill, but the elections also will have prevented one if because of them Clinton decides not to nominate Mr. Edelman, a Georgetown University law professor, to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. That is the court from which one-third of today's Supreme Court (Justices Scalia, Thomas and Ginsburg) came.President Clinton purportedly was startled to learn, rather late, the contents of Lani Guinier's writings.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | March 15, 1991
To establish a "town meeting for the Third District," county Councilman Carl "Dutch" Holland, R-Pasadena, is calling together the presidents of community associations he represents to form an umbrella organization.Holland says he has had a positive response from "more than 60" of the 80 active community associations in his district, "and the responses are still trickling in."The first meeting of the "Community Council Committee" will be 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 20, in the Long Point Community Hall.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 4, 1991
MOSCOW -- Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin tried to kick a balky Congress of People's Deputies into action yesterday before time runs out on their plan to remake the government."
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | June 5, 1991
KUWAIT'S ruling al Sabah family was notably generous with its political promises after it was driven into exile last August by Iraq's invasion. The assurances were virtually non-stop that the emir and other top leaders would assure that post-liberation Kuwait could look forward to a new political order based on more representative government.Now, after the tremendously costly U.N.-led intervention to free Kuwait from the invading Iraqis, that pledge so far remains unredeemed.Now the emir says merely that new parliamentary elections are indeed planned, but not for another 16 months.
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