Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRepresentative Democracy
IN THE NEWS

Representative Democracy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 17, 2013
I read with interest the recent article "Carroll conservatives clash with Van Hollen" (Nov. 12). I could readily relate to Carroll County Republican Bill Schroeder's statement - "We have nothing in common with Montgomery County - absolutely nothing" - concerning his representative, Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat who lives in and primarily represents Montgomery Co. And, according to the article, that county "accounts for most of the district's population....
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2014
Dan Rodricks , please have a seat ( "Is popular vote best way to pick a sheriff?" July 8). The general electorate is already only minimally involved, at best, in the process of filling offices, and a vote for a "down ballot" candidate, as Mr. Rodricks dismissively calls them, represents one of the few opportunities to be involved in a representative fashion in local affairs. If ignorance of candidates' qualifications was a deciding criterion, only a few would be qualified to vote for the office of president of the United States or other federal offices.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 21, 2012
Fresh off of his referendum victories, Gov. Martin O'Malley said that throughout Maryland's history the state has been better served by "a representative democracy rather than plebiscites. " I looked up the word plebiscite in the dictionary and found it means "a vote by which the people of an entire country or district express an opinion for or against a proposal especially on a choice of government or ruler. " Put simply, the people have the ability to voice their opinion on a choice made on their behalf by the government.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
What's going on here? First it's the Internal Revenue Service harassing and intimidating minority political organizations. And now it's the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office trying to act as judge and jury regarding the ongoing debate over the use of the Washington Redskins team name ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). This is apparently the brave new world of American democracy. Special interest groups now look to resolve any issue in their favor by raising a strident clamor and then look forward expectantly as a federal bureaucracy, obscure or not, resolves everything in their favor.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
On Tuesday, Dan Rodricks cast Bobby Zirkin as a "secret Republican" for voting against a tax increase aimed at wealthy taxpayers. On the next day, the senator defended his position by noting "our citizens are suffering through a serious economic downturn" ("Zirkin: Why isn't Dan Rodricks disgusted?" March 21). Having represented his district for 20 years, I feel his pain. He's caught between finding money to run the state as a business enterprise and being a representative of the people back home.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
Dan Rodricks , please have a seat ( "Is popular vote best way to pick a sheriff?" July 8). The general electorate is already only minimally involved, at best, in the process of filling offices, and a vote for a "down ballot" candidate, as Mr. Rodricks dismissively calls them, represents one of the few opportunities to be involved in a representative fashion in local affairs. If ignorance of candidates' qualifications was a deciding criterion, only a few would be qualified to vote for the office of president of the United States or other federal offices.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
I was stunned by the contradictions between two recent editorials published by your newspaper. In the first ("Term limits are back," Sept. 2), you bemoaned new calls for legislative term limits in Maryland. You stated that term limits would suck the experience out of the legislature and transfer more power to the governor, staff, lobbyists and political parties. You called it a "formula for machine politics. " You then declared that frustrated voters could overcome the lock entrenched politicians have on their offices by simply voting them out. In a subsequent editorial about redrawing political districts ("Drawing a line," Sept.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
What's going on here? First it's the Internal Revenue Service harassing and intimidating minority political organizations. And now it's the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office trying to act as judge and jury regarding the ongoing debate over the use of the Washington Redskins team name ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). This is apparently the brave new world of American democracy. Special interest groups now look to resolve any issue in their favor by raising a strident clamor and then look forward expectantly as a federal bureaucracy, obscure or not, resolves everything in their favor.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,TPG Communications | June 22, 1992
Ten years after "In Search of Excellence," "a bias for action" still tops my list of business commandments. So you might be surprised to learn that I oppose Ross Perot's undeclared presidential candidacy. Here's why:1. What Constitution? Mr. Perot would strip Congress of its exclusive right to raise revenues. And as for privacy, forget it: It's said he once suggested we cordon off poor neighborhoods, then go on a house-by-house search for guns and drugs. But it's Mr. Perot's teledemocracy scheme that could unleash the darkest forces imaginable.
NEWS
January 16, 2005
THERE MAY BE virtues associated with allowing politicians in Maryland and most other states to draw the legislative districts from which they run. But merits of the practice don't spring easily to mind. Far more obvious are its ill effects: gerrymandered districts that decimate communities; seats so safe any nincompoop can win re-election; the rapid disappearance of moderates in both parties, leaving behind extremists unable to reach consensus; and a growing distance between the representative and the represented.
NEWS
November 17, 2013
I read with interest the recent article "Carroll conservatives clash with Van Hollen" (Nov. 12). I could readily relate to Carroll County Republican Bill Schroeder's statement - "We have nothing in common with Montgomery County - absolutely nothing" - concerning his representative, Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat who lives in and primarily represents Montgomery Co. And, according to the article, that county "accounts for most of the district's population....
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | February 5, 2013
Last week, top Maryland Democrats announced their intention to make it more difficult to put statewide policy referenda on the ballot. The move is a clear response to Republicans' success last year in putting to referendum policy questions in the hope of achieving victories the GOP couldn't win in the legislature. The Republicans' ballot plans backfired, most notably the surprising approval by voters of same-sex marriage. But the Democrats, who dominate state politics thanks to large legislative majorities, took notice of the potential threat to their legislative monopoly.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
Fresh off of his referendum victories, Gov. Martin O'Malley said that throughout Maryland's history the state has been better served by "a representative democracy rather than plebiscites. " I looked up the word plebiscite in the dictionary and found it means "a vote by which the people of an entire country or district express an opinion for or against a proposal especially on a choice of government or ruler. " Put simply, the people have the ability to voice their opinion on a choice made on their behalf by the government.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
On Tuesday, Dan Rodricks cast Bobby Zirkin as a "secret Republican" for voting against a tax increase aimed at wealthy taxpayers. On the next day, the senator defended his position by noting "our citizens are suffering through a serious economic downturn" ("Zirkin: Why isn't Dan Rodricks disgusted?" March 21). Having represented his district for 20 years, I feel his pain. He's caught between finding money to run the state as a business enterprise and being a representative of the people back home.
EXPLORE
February 9, 2012
One of the first solutions suggested when the subject of government being out of touch with the voters comes up is term limits. By limiting the number of years in office someone can serve, so goes the logic, it is assured new people who are closer to the issues are always entering elected office and making decisions. Presumably, such well-intentioned sentiments are behind a proposed change to Harford County's charter to limit county council members to two consecutive four-year terms, the same limit imposed on the office of county executive.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
I was stunned by the contradictions between two recent editorials published by your newspaper. In the first ("Term limits are back," Sept. 2), you bemoaned new calls for legislative term limits in Maryland. You stated that term limits would suck the experience out of the legislature and transfer more power to the governor, staff, lobbyists and political parties. You called it a "formula for machine politics. " You then declared that frustrated voters could overcome the lock entrenched politicians have on their offices by simply voting them out. In a subsequent editorial about redrawing political districts ("Drawing a line," Sept.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer Aglaia Pikounis contributed to this article | June 11, 1993
Don't call them flower children, they said, because that's not what they are."And I'm not a hippie, or whatever you want to call me, either. I'm just here because I see injustice being done and I want my voice heard," said protester Andrew Williams of Rockville."
EXPLORE
February 9, 2012
One of the first solutions suggested when the subject of government being out of touch with the voters comes up is term limits. By limiting the number of years in office someone can serve, so goes the logic, it is assured new people who are closer to the issues are always entering elected office and making decisions. Presumably, such well-intentioned sentiments are behind a proposed change to Harford County's charter to limit county council members to two consecutive four-year terms, the same limit imposed on the office of county executive.
NEWS
January 16, 2005
THERE MAY BE virtues associated with allowing politicians in Maryland and most other states to draw the legislative districts from which they run. But merits of the practice don't spring easily to mind. Far more obvious are its ill effects: gerrymandered districts that decimate communities; seats so safe any nincompoop can win re-election; the rapid disappearance of moderates in both parties, leaving behind extremists unable to reach consensus; and a growing distance between the representative and the represented.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer Aglaia Pikounis contributed to this article | June 11, 1993
Don't call them flower children, they said, because that's not what they are."And I'm not a hippie, or whatever you want to call me, either. I'm just here because I see injustice being done and I want my voice heard," said protester Andrew Williams of Rockville."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.