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NEWS
July 16, 2013
I received my commercial property tax bill and cleverly concealed with no explanation was the much anticipated "rain tax" section of the bill. I knew it was going to be ugly, and so it was. I had already familiarized myself with the details. It was ironic that it showed up just a couple of days before the Fourth of July, the anniversary commemorating the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain. I was reminded of the Boston Tea Party, when patriots threw tea into Boston Harbor to protest the king's taxation without representation.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Latinos have for years made up one of the largest and fastest-growing groups in the country. They have also long been one of the most underrepresented minority groups in the federal workplace. Now a new effort is underway - at the highest level of federal hiring - to address that disparity. "There is tremendous growth, as you know, in the Latino community, and we see more and more young people graduating from university, and I really want to tap into those numbers," said Katherine Archuleta, the director of the federal Office of Personnel Management.
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NEWS
By Thomas Goldwasser | October 20, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Like millions of other Americans, I recently performed my civic duty by serving on a jury for a case of murder in the first degree. As a longtime resident of the District of Columbia, I, along with my fellow 572,000 citizens, pay the second highest per capita federal tax burden in the nation after Connecticut. More residents of the District, as Washington is known to locals, have died in our country's military conflicts than residents of 10 states. Reserve units from the nation's capital continue to serve and risk their lives in Iraq.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 28, 2014
Del. Rudolph C. Cane bid farewell Friday to the House of Delegates, saying goodbye to the chamber where he's represented the Eastern Shore as its first African-American representataive for nearly 16 years, an advocate for diversity and the interests of his region. The soft-spoken Democrat from Hebron, 79, had previously declared his intention to retire at the end of his fourth term. But he departed a little more than a week before the 90-day legislative session ends because he's scheduled to have back surgery on Monday.
NEWS
By Karoun Demirjian and Karoun Demirjian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 20, 2007
Taxation Without Representation" - emblazoned on District of Columbia license plates - could be on its way out. The House voted 241-177 yesterday to give the District a voting representative in Congress. "This has been a 206-year labor of love," said Eleanor Holmes Norton, a nonvoting delegate who represents Washington's 550,000 people. However, the fate of the measure is uncertain in the Senate, where Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, a Connecticut Democrat, is expected to introduce a version of the bill soon.
NEWS
By Doug Colbert | April 15, 2013
While the nation celebrated the 50th anniversary of a poor person's constitutional right to a lawyer, Maryland legislators' support for House Bill 153 in the recently concluded General Assembly session threatened to return to the days when an accused person went without a public defender's representation. Without any fanfare or media attention, HB 153 quietly made its way through the House of Delegates. Then, it took just one proponent to convince the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee to approve a bill that prohibited a public defender from continuing to represent clients beyond a bail review hearing, upon the client's release from jail.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Derrick Dunn went to jail recently, charged with driving on a suspended license. Under normal circumstances, he would still be in the Baltimore City Detention Center, trying to figure out how to make bail.But a group of law students from the University of Maryland picked up his case and gave him something that most people accused of crimes in Baltimore and throughout the state rarely receive -- legal advice and representation during bail reviews shortly after they are arrested.Dunn is one of almost a dozen people held on nonserious charges who have been released on bail or on personal recognizance because of the month-old project.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 17, 1991
The secretary of commerce has determined that the 5.3 million people who eluded the Census are not Republican or deserving of representation.People still swim in U.S. coastal waters though the fish, who know better, increasingly don't.Mideast talks are on again, if only to keep Jim Baker busy.
NEWS
April 9, 2005
A March 31 article regarding Baltimore's legal settlement with former Fire Battalion Chief Andrew P. Shows might have left the wrong impression about the actions of the fire officers union leadership. Union President Stephen G. Fugate says that while the union leaders did not agree with the premise of Shows' argument, they provided the required legal representation for Shows through the Civil Service Commission appeal process.
NEWS
July 23, 2001
CENSUS FIGURES and history tell us why the Anne Arundel County NAACP thinks a majority-minority county council district is necessary. Anne Arundel is 13.6 percent black, but only one African-American has served on the county's council since charter government began in 1964. All seven current council members are white. But race can't be the sole factor in determining how to represent communities fairly, and racial gerrymandering is not the answer to unfair representation. Moreover, with the county's dispersed minority population, it would seem impossible to contrive a majority- minority district.
NEWS
By Michael Schatzow and Mitchell Y. Mirviss | March 28, 2014
"A poor man accused of a crime has no lobby," Robert F. Kennedy said 51 years ago, when, as U.S. Attorney General, he demanded legislation requiring counsel for federal criminal defendants. The legislation passed, much to Kennedy's credit, and, for the last half-century, counsel has been present at federal bail hearings. But not in Maryland. No Bobby Kennedy has taken leadership to fix our broken criminal justice system. And there is no lobby to oppose the vested economic interests (bail bondsmen and some criminal defense lawyers)
NEWS
January 19, 2014
Judge Alfred Nance's recent order requiring the assistance of legal counsel to defendants at pre-trial hearings hopefully will serve as a wake-up call for Maryland's criminal justice system ( "Court order could push state to send lawyers to bail hearings," Jan. 15). Plaintiffs' attorney Michael Schatzhow called it correctly when he asserts that the courts, local and state funding entities and the entire legal community need to look ahead at what's around the corner. The issue of re-expanding rights to representation has been bubbling up for the past year or two in Maryland.
NEWS
By Rob Richie | November 13, 2013
We are a year away from the 2014 elections, but the early returns are already in: FairVote's "Monopoly Politics 2014" projects winners and their victory margins in 373 of 435 congressional districts. That means more than 85 percent of "races" are so safe for incumbents that nothing in the upcoming year of governing and campaigning will change the outcome. For Maryland, it's even more of a blowout: Seven Democrats and one Republican are all secure in their districts in 2014. Last year, every race was won by a landslide margin of at least 20 percent.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
I received my commercial property tax bill and cleverly concealed with no explanation was the much anticipated "rain tax" section of the bill. I knew it was going to be ugly, and so it was. I had already familiarized myself with the details. It was ironic that it showed up just a couple of days before the Fourth of July, the anniversary commemorating the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain. I was reminded of the Boston Tea Party, when patriots threw tea into Boston Harbor to protest the king's taxation without representation.
NEWS
By Michael Wein | July 11, 2013
This month, Kimberly Perry, the new head of D.C. Vote, acknowledged the fatigue of past efforts to gain federal voting rights for the residents of Washington, D.C., and told The Washington Post, "there's always been the discussion of retrocession [to Maryland] as a possible solution. " The possibility of "retrocession" has not gotten much attention, but a carefully crafted bill that permits a "legalistic" and "technical" return of the District to the state from which it was carved, for federal voting purposes alone, is made possible by a recent and largely overlooked Supreme Court case.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
It's unfortunate that reality and Trey Kovacs' recent commentary ("Unions business on taxpayers' dime," April 19) seem to bear little relation to one another. As the president of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County, I can say that he's way off on the two topics he attempts to tackle in his recent article: Fair Share and union release time. The Fair Share legislation will create an environment of fairness and equity among all of our educators, who all contribute to the negotiated benefits and legally required representation that they all enjoy.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
At-large elections don't represent all Far from being "the more democratic system" as described by many Harford County residents, at-large representation should be denounced as the instrument of racism that it clearly is in a county with such stark ethnic dividing lines. Uncritical support of such is shameful in this day and age. My observations aren't expressed to endorse any political position, but rather to address a fundamental issue of fairness and respect. The equitable solution to the issues of conflicted boundaries for police, fire companies and rec councils is to adjust the boundaries, not institute the de facto disenfranchisement of a portion of our diverse citizenry.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
Nickolaus Mueller writes that "Tax cuts across the board [i.e., for the very wealthiest as well as the other 98 percent of U.S. taxpayers] make sense because the government doesn't have any right to spend individuals' earnings on any public project they choose in the first place. " (Readers respond, Sept. 15.) Excuse me, that "first place" is the U.S. Constitution, and it gives just the right you claim is nonexistent. I suggest you read Article 1, Section 8, the first paragraph, as well as the Sixteenth Amendment, which give the federal government the power "to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare" and "to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived.
NEWS
By Doug Colbert | April 15, 2013
While the nation celebrated the 50th anniversary of a poor person's constitutional right to a lawyer, Maryland legislators' support for House Bill 153 in the recently concluded General Assembly session threatened to return to the days when an accused person went without a public defender's representation. Without any fanfare or media attention, HB 153 quietly made its way through the House of Delegates. Then, it took just one proponent to convince the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee to approve a bill that prohibited a public defender from continuing to represent clients beyond a bail review hearing, upon the client's release from jail.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
The Maryland General Assembly passed bills this month that effectively reverse a Court of Appeals ruling that would have required public defenders for indigent defendants at thousands of initial bail hearings held before court commissioners each year. The legislation instead requires lawyers for poor people at reviews of those hearings, which occur less frequently and take place in front of a judge — sometimes days later. That means some of those arrested and denied bail or unable to afford it could spend a weekend or longer in jail awaiting representation.
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