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By FRED RASMUSSEN and FRED RASMUSSEN,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1996
Weldon Wallace, who during his 38-year career as a critic and reporter for The Sun could nimbly write about the complexities of a Bach fugue or the tempestuous nature of politics in Italy, died Sunday of arteriosclerosis at his Homeland residence. He was 83.He began his career in 1933 as a reporter for the Daily Ardmoreite in Ardmore, Okla., and, after working as program director for a radio station there, joined The Sun in 1940 as music critic.He enlisted in the Army in 1942 and was assigned to Special Services, where he edited the Report newsletter from a bombed-out high-rise in downtown Manila, the Philippines.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 27, 2008
Stuart McIver Sr., a newspaper reporter whose assignments included early Baltimore Colts coverage, died Thursday of complications from surgery at North Broward Medical Center in Pompano Beach, Fla. He was 86 and lived in Lighthouse Point, Fla. Born in Sanford, N.C., he earned a journalism degree at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and worked on Greensboro and Charlotte newspapers before moving to Baltimore and joining the The Sun's staff...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 17, 2003
SO HERE IT IS: the inevitable and obligatory Jayson Blair column from a newspaper columnist. Blair is the New York Times reporter who is the latest in what (we journalist types hope) is a short line of gifted fiction writers who, for some odd reason, choose to work as reporters at newspapers or magazines. He resigned May 1. His series of miscues, fanciful inventions and plagiarism has prompted yet another round of angst from those in the business and inspired a call for truth in journalism.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | January 30, 1995
The two young women were standing outside the courthouse entrance, pancake makeup on their pretty faces, microphones in their hands and the gleam of the huntress in their eyes.They were flanked by several of the large trade-school dropouts who make their living aiming TV cameras at anything that might make a bleeding blip on the nightly news. As I approached, the young women smiled and moved toward me. One of them tried her best to shove the microphone up my left nostril, while asking one of the most amazingly stupid questions I have heard in 40 years in the news business.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
Wilson "Buck" Auld Jr., who as a determined reporter grabbed the nation's attention when he broke the Pumpkin Papers story and the lurid details of the Dorothy Grammer murder case, died March 17 of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Hillendale resident was 84.Mr. Auld, who began his newspaper career in 1929 as a copy boy for the old , was promoted in the late 1930s to police reporter and happily took to the streets of Baltimore.Respected in the news business for his vast knowledge of the city, Mr. Auld possessed all the credentials that would serve him well in his career as a reporter and later as assistant city editor before he retired in 1978.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
The Supreme Court refused yesterday to review a ruling against a Baltimore journalist who sued the city's former Police Department spokesman over access to governmental information.The court rejected an appeal by Terrie Snyder without comment and refused to revive her 1995 suit against Samuel Ringgold, the department's former public affairs director.Snyder, a free-lance reporter for the City Paper, called the decision "outrageous and truly frightening.""By refusing to consider this case, the court has said that it's all right for government officials to discriminate and turn down requests for information from reporters who don't report what's to their liking," Snyder said.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | January 11, 2007
The leader of a local group that wants to buy The Sun denied yesterday a published report that it is in "serious negotiations" to buy the daily newspaper, though he says he still hopes to eventually get a chance to bid for the publication. Theodore G. Venetoulis, a publisher and former Baltimore County executive who is leading the Baltimore Media Group that hopes to buy the newspaper, said an article in yesterday's Examiner is "totally untrue." "There are no negotiations going on," said Venetoulis, who says he has been unable to get The Sun's parent, Tribune Co., to disclose financial information about the newspaper for his investors to study.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Fred Rasmussen and Dan Morse and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
John Woodruff, a longtime Sun reporter whose assignments ranged from Baltimore zoning issues to the opening of China, died of cancer Sunday at his Cockeysville home. He was 57.He was described by colleagues and people he covered as a tough, fair and enthusiastic reporter."He honestly believed that journalists could make things better for people," said Gerald P. Merrell, The Sun's business editor. "He threw himself into any story, large or small."Richard O'Mara, former foreign editor and now a reporter for The Sun, recalled Mr. Woodruff saying, " 'Getting on the front page is like heroin.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 7, 2003
David Bloom, a 39-year-old NBC News correspondent whose boyish enthusiasm and energetic style of presentation made him a rising star in network news, died yesterday in Iraq while covering the war. Mr. Bloom, whose war coverage was showcased on NBC and cable channel MSNBC, died of an apparent blood clot in his lungs early yesterday morning, according to NBC. He was in camp outside of Baghdad with the U.S. Army's 3rd Infantry, the division with which he...
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Murray Kempton, who died the other day at 79, graced the New York newspaper scene for half a century with his elegantly written column, and for nearly as long informed and beguiled generations of reporters on the national political campaign trail.In a world of grubby little men (and only later women) chasing political candidates around the country scribbling in their notebooks while puffing on dangling cigarettes, the sartorially proper Mr. Kempton more often than not hovered above, taking in the panorama.
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