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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 17, 1994
STOCKTON, Calif. -- Until a decade ago, women at the Diamond Walnut processing plant were trailblazers. Long allowed only to sort and pack nuts, the women were allowed to vie with men for better jobs, such as running machinery.But today the women of Diamond Walnut are only vying to get their jobs back. A strike that began over wages 2 1/2 years ago has turned into a challenge of the right of employers to hire permanent replacement workers.Diamond says it owes a huge debt to the replacement workers.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
It's been five days since 85-year-old Odra Pickeral has had phone service in her residence. Macular degeneration makes seeing a keypad tough, and her home's phone is programmed for frequently dialed numbers. Pickeral is one of more than 100 residents at Heartlands Senior Living Village in Ellicott City who has had to share community phones for almost a week because of the Verizon Communications Inc. worker strike. "I have to ask someone to dial the phone for me," she said. "My daughter tried to call the other day to see if I needed groceries, medications, and couldn't get through.
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NEWS
By KIM CLARK and KIM CLARK,Kim Clark is a business reporter for The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 1992
The United Auto Workers' decision to send strikers back to their jobs at Caterpillar Inc. last week was the labor equivalent of a Dunkirk operation -- a retreat that saved the union to fight another day.Like Dunkirk, the move was a humiliating education for the retreaters. And like Dunkirk, it will have vast repercussions on people not directly involved in the dispute.Just ask someone like Rodney Dize. Mr. Dize, who drove car-hauling trucks out of Baltimore before he was elected to a local Teamsters office, said he has now realized that strikes, while occasionally necessary, "don't have a chance."
FEATURES
By Lynn Smith | November 14, 2007
When veteran soap opera writers heard ABC's official statement about the post-strike future of its daytime dramas - "We will continue to produce original programming with no repeats and without interruption" - they knew it was bad news. If history repeats itself, it meant they would be replaced, as soon as necessary, by strike-breakers, nonunion writers - or maybe even the producers themselves. "They'll write it however they can get it written," said Marlene Clark Poulter, a 17-year soap opera writer on strike from DirecTV's Passions.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
The company that built the engine involved in a fatal Baltimore police helicopter crash Nov. 4 confirmed yesterday that the motor was assembled by workers who had not been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration.Michael D. Wolf, a vice president of marketing for Pennsylvania-based Textron-Lycoming, said yesterday that the workers -- filling in during a strike -- were qualified, despite their lack of FAA certification.Wolf refused to say which jobs were handled by the uncertified employees, some of whom he described as office workers.
NEWS
By Stacey Evers and Stacey Evers,States News Service | July 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- House Democratic leaders predicted that House members would vote overwhelmingly today in favor of a bill that would prohibit employers from permanently replacing striking workers.Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, Majority Whip William H. Gray of Pennsylvania, House Speaker Thomas S. Foley of Washington and House Democratic Caucus Chairman Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland said the bill would have an easy ride through the House."We will adopt this and turn around a decade of unfairness," Hoyer said yesterday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1998
Federal investigators are trying to determine whether a faulty engine that caused a Baltimore police helicopter to crash, killing its pilot, was shoddily assembled by replacement workers during a strike at a Pennsylvania company.Jim Cain, an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, said he does not know why a connecting rod flew loose and punctured two holes in the engine casing of the Schweizer 300C chopper.But Cain said the four-cylinder engine "was built during the time-frame" of a contentious labor dispute at the Textron-Wycoming plant in Williamsport, Pa. He said investigators "are trying to determine" whether replacement workers built the motor.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
PEORIA, Ill. -- Ten times in 2 1/2 years the United Auto Workers struck Caterpillar Inc., but with no visible effect on the company.Now as the union enters the third week of yet another walkout, many believe the outcome of the 11th will be different.The company and the strikers are in the midst of a battle that could redefine all American workers' speech and strike rights.Although the two sides are deeply divided, they do agree on one point: Whatever the outcome, this latest strike by 14,000 UAW members could set a new tone for labor-management relations nationwide.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Ross Hetrick and Norris P. West and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | August 12, 1991
A union striking a southwest Baltimore beer distributor plans to ask beer drinkers in the Baltimore area to boycott certain brands in reaction to the proposed permanent replacement of 90 truck drivers and warehouse workers.Members of Brewery Workers Local 1010, a Teamsters affiliate, struck the Bond Distributing Co. at 11 o'clock last night, saying that negotiations had not progressed since their contract expired June 30. They said the company's plan to use replacement workers is an attempt to break their union.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | July 15, 1991
Congress is scheduled to vote this week on legislation that state labor experts say could change the balance between unions and management.But union leaders and business representatives disagree on the way the legislation could tilt the scales.The bill, which would make it illegal for employers to permanently replace striking workers, has the support of all but three members of Maryland's congressional delegation. The three lawmakers say they have yet to decide how they will vote.The bill is scheduled to come before the House of Representatives Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 12, 2005
ST. PAUL, Minn. - A week away from what could be the first major airline strike in seven years, Northwest Airlines asserts that it can operate without missing a beat if its unionized mechanics are off the job. The company has worked for 18 months and spent tens of millions of dollars to recruit and train more than 1,000 replacement workers who would be tapped to keep its planes flying if its flight attendants opt to join the mechanics on the picket line....
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 20, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Major labor strikes that erupted last week against grocery stores and the public transit agency here suggest that workers are increasingly willing to stop work over the spiraling cost of health care. Negotiations broke down over employers' attempts to pass on part of the double-digit increases in health insurance premiums. And with costs showing no sign of retreating, more strife is expected across the nation. "It is the single most vexatious bargaining issue now," said Peter J. Hurtgen, head of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Services.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 7, 2001
SUMMER JOBS are good for kids; they teach them responsibility. That is what I kept telling myself this week as the burglar alarm in a friend's house screeched, as the police car rolled up, and as I punched the telephone frantically trying to reach someone who could tell me how to stop the earsplitting noise. This was a summer job gone awry, a dad fumbling as he tried to perform his kid's duties. It began when friends who live near us left town for a few days. They hired one of our sons to pick up the mail and keep an eye on their house.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2001
As the strike at General Ship Repair Corp. in Locust Point dragged into its second month, the union and company said yesterday that they are no closer to reaching an agreement and ending the dispute. Two dozen workers walked off the job May 1 after the two sides failed to reach agreements on wages and working conditions. The company has brought in replacement workers and is still doing ship repairs. "We haven't talked to management for three weeks," said Lonnie Vick, a representative for the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
The company that built the engine involved in a fatal Baltimore police helicopter crash Nov. 4 confirmed yesterday that the motor was assembled by workers who had not been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration.Michael D. Wolf, a vice president of marketing for Pennsylvania-based Textron-Lycoming, said yesterday that the workers -- filling in during a strike -- were qualified, despite their lack of FAA certification.Wolf refused to say which jobs were handled by the uncertified employees, some of whom he described as office workers.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1998
Federal investigators are trying to determine whether a faulty engine that caused a Baltimore police helicopter to crash, killing its pilot, was shoddily assembled by replacement workers during a strike at a Pennsylvania company.Jim Cain, an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board, said he does not know why a connecting rod flew loose and punctured two holes in the engine casing of the Schweizer 300C chopper.But Cain said the four-cylinder engine "was built during the time-frame" of a contentious labor dispute at the Textron-Wycoming plant in Williamsport, Pa. He said investigators "are trying to determine" whether replacement workers built the motor.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1994
Striking workers at Poly-Seal Corp., a Baltimore-based maker of plastic bottle caps and other container seals, will vote Wednesday on a proposed contract that changes work schedules and revamps health benefits.But the president of the local union has already refused to endorse the proposal, and he doubted whether the rest of the union negotiating committee would recommend it to the rank and file."They haven't put anything on the table. To me they are not bargaining in good faith," said Robert S. Meyers, president of Local 6967 of the United Steelworkers of America, which represents the 380 workers who have been on strike for five weeks.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
About 150 union members, Baltimore residents and environmentalists rallied outside a Hawkins Point medical incinerator yesterday to protest a stalemate in contract negotiations that has left 70 workers unemployed since the company locked them out in June.The protesters began gathering outside the incinerator at 3200 Hawkins Point Road, owned by Phoenix Services Inc., about 4: 30 p.m. The incinerator is on the southern edge of the city, just north of the Anne Arundel County line.The rally, organized by the Metropolitan Baltimore Council AFL-CIO Unions, drew supporters from the United Auto Workers, the Communications Workers of America and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, among other unions.
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