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Replacement Therapy

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 19, 2002
Last month, the federal government halted a major study of hormone replacement therapy in healthy women, saying the treatment under study seemed to do more harm than good. But while that action generated headlines and alarm, few people noticed just a few weeks earlier when the government decided not to go ahead with a different study of hormone replacement - in older men. The hormone is testosterone, and its use is soaring. Doctors wrote 1.5 million prescriptions for testosterone and drugs like it in 2001, up from 806,000 in 1997.
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NEWS
By Kathe Lebeau | October 8, 2012
On Tuesday, I'm lucky to be speaking at Home Dialyzors United's third-annual meet up and conference in Baltimore. As an end stage renal disease patient currently doing home hemodialysis treatment, this is an issue I am passionate about. And, mostly because I'm an actual home dialysis patient, I'm able to attend the conference — since my dialysis travels with me — to speak firsthand about the benefits of home dialysis and help spread the word. It's an important conversation that I don't think happens nearly enough.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2002
Women who recently learned that hormone therapy can raise their risk of heart disease and other ailments might someday have to consider a potential benefit: that hormones protect against Alzheimer's disease. Scientists studying elderly women in a Utah county found that those who took the hormones had lower risk of developing the brain disease, which wipes out memory and the ability to carry out simple tasks. The findings "provide new evidence to suggest a protective effect" of hormone replacement therapy, according to researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health whose study appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | February 27, 2008
For doctors at Anne Arundel Medical Center, the common-sense idea was too good to pass up: offer habitual smokers a low-cost CT scan to see if cancer has taken root in their lungs. CT scans can spot lung nodules as small as a grain of rice. Lung cancer, the deadliest of all cancers, is often caught too late to be cured, long after the first symptoms have appeared. "If you find [lung cancer] earlier and smaller, you have a better chance of curing it," said Dr. Kenneth Adam Lee, the hospital's chief of thoracic surgery.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | August 5, 2001
This summer one of the most prescribed group of drugs in the U.S. has become one of the most controversial. Two weeks ago, the American Heart Association issued new guidelines recommending that women not go on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) solely to prevent heart attacks and stroke, a change from its former position. Earlier this summer, an editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Association made national news by questioning whether estrogen helps prevent fractures caused by osteoporosis in older women.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | December 14, 1993
Physicians may prescribe a course of estrogen replacement therapy, or sometimes a low-dose oral contraceptive, for women who are troubled by perimenopausal symptoms.Many researchers believe that hormone replacement therapy can also help protect women against heart disease and osteoporosis, conditions which estrogen helps control.(Women who have had cancer or such conditions as heart, liver and gallbladder disease are often advised not to try HRT.)The most commonly prescribed form of treatment uses both estrogen and progestin, a synthetic hormone similar to the natural female hormone progesterone.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | February 19, 1991
Q: I just turned 50 and have begun to have mild menopausal symptoms. I am confused by the many pros and cons about the use of estrogen replacement therapy after menopause. What is your opinion?A: Two unquestioned benefits of estrogen replacement therapare easing or eliminating menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, and reducing the risk of developing osteoporosis. Although the evidence is not yet conclusive, most studies have shown estrogen therapy also improves the levels of certain blood lipids and reduces the risk of a heart attack.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 1997
In the largest such study to date, federal researchers have found that estrogen replacement therapy among postmenopausal women decreases the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease by more than 50 percent.Experts said the new study out of Baltimore -- which included 472 women monitored for 16 years -- is important because it is the first long-term analysis of estrogen's effects on this disease that affects more than 4 million Americans.Earlier studies had hinted at such a beneficial effect but were much smaller and covered periods of up to only a few months.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 1996
About 25 percent of postmenopausal women in the United States take estrogen replacement therapy because of evidence that it protects against osteoporosis and heart disease. Even more of these women feel free to have a drink now and then because of research showing that it, too, may protect against heart disease.But a new study raises a host of questions about the long-term health consequences of drinking even small amounts of alcohol while taking the hormone therapy.The study found that when postmenopausal women on oral estrogen drank the equivalent of just half a glass of wine, the levels of estrogen circulating in their blood nearly doubled, on average.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 27, 1995
The top-selling drug in America is Premarin, a combination of estrogens refined from pregnant mares' urine. This formulation has been on the market for more than 50 years. Few drugs have experienced such phenomenal success for such a long time.Initially, Premarin was prescribed to relieve hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause. In the 1960s and early 1970s this drug became extremely popular. Many women were led to believe that hormones could keep them looking young indefinitely. The book "Feminine Forever" endorsed estrogen replacement therapy.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | July 12, 2007
Several years ago, I noticed that gum irritations healed more quickly after I used Listerine. I decided to try it on facial blemishes. If it is applied as soon as a blemish begins, the spot fades quickly. You are the second person who has told us that Listerine mouthwash can speed blemish healing. We cannot explain why it might work, but it seems like a benign approach. Months ago, I heard about a new prescription drug for weight loss that also lowered cholesterol and blood sugar levels.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | June 23, 2006
I just read the question posed about removing petroleum jelly from hair and I have a solution. As a child, my mom and her best friend convinced me to let them put huge quantities of Vaseline in my hair. After all, I was being a monster for Halloween, and I'd be scarier with crazy hair! I spent the next two days in tears while they shampooed my hair with everything from dish soap to Boraxo. Finally, someone suggested Goop, the garage mechanic's hand soap. It finally broke through the inch-thick layer of grease!
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 2005
Nearly two-thirds of women who use hormone supplements to control menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats and depression suffer a recurrence or a worsening of symptoms once they stop the therapy, according to a study published yesterday. But many of the 63 percent who had a recurrence were able to ease symptoms with "lifestyle changes, such as drinking more fluids, starting or increasing exercise [and] practicing yoga," said Dr. Jennifer Hays of Houston's Baylor College of Medicine, one of the study's authors.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | January 30, 2005
My grandson has behavior problems and has been on Prozac since age 4. Because he is still disruptive in class, the doctor recently added Adderall. His concentration is somewhat improved, but he is still disruptive. Is the combination of Prozac and Adderall safe for a 7-year-old? The Food and Drug Administration has recently asked makers of serotonin-type antidepressants like Prozac to add new warnings. The agency cautions prescribers that some children may experience anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, irritability, hostility, impulsivity and restlessness.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2004
Estrogen therapy not only does not protect women age 65 and older against Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia, as scientists once hoped, but it might slightly hasten senility, according to the results of a study of women's health. These results, reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, could end scientists' hopes for estrogen replacement therapy in older women. The treatment, once thought to reduce many of the ravages of age, such as strokes and dementia, seems to enhance those problems.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 2, 2004
Why isn't more attention given to the best sunburn preventive, aspirin? Before a heart attack in 1978, I suffered from sunburn with blisters every year. Starting in 1978, I have taken a coated aspirin daily to prevent another heart attack. I have not had a sunburn since then. My skin temporarily reddens, without pain or blistering, and eventually tans. A study on aspirin several years back revealed that aspirin increases the skin's resistance to sunburn. Nothing can really prevent a bad burn if someone spends too much time in direct sunlight.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2004
Estrogen therapy not only does not protect women age 65 and older against Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia, as scientists once hoped, but it might slightly hasten senility, according to the results of a study of women's health. These results, reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, could end scientists' hopes for estrogen replacement therapy in older women. The treatment, once thought to reduce many of the ravages of age, such as strokes and dementia, seems to enhance those problems.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 30, 2000
A new medication that arrived in pharmacies last month is raising the possibility of widespread hormone replacement therapy for men -- much like for post-menopausal women -- even as it raises fears about misuse. The product, a gel form of testosterone called AndroGel, is approved for use in men with abnormally low levels of testosterone. Currently, only about 150,000 to 200,000 men are being treated for low testosterone, although the advent of AndroGel could boost that number to 5 million.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2004
For older women, estrogen was a wonder drug. The hormone not only relieved menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and mood swings, but also prevented bone loss, heart disease and memory problems. Better yet, it endowed many of those who took it with youth and vigor. At least, that's what everybody thought. Over the past two years, estrogen's reputation has plummeted. Two large-scale clinical studies by the National Institutes of Health were called off early when researchers decided that hormone replacement therapy increased the risk of stroke and heart disease -- the very ailments it was thought to prevent.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2002
Women who recently learned that hormone therapy can raise their risk of heart disease and other ailments might someday have to consider a potential benefit: that hormones protect against Alzheimer's disease. Scientists studying elderly women in a Utah county found that those who took the hormones had lower risk of developing the brain disease, which wipes out memory and the ability to carry out simple tasks. The findings "provide new evidence to suggest a protective effect" of hormone replacement therapy, according to researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health whose study appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
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