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SPORTS
January 3, 2010
The worst home record in the NHL led to the end of Andy Murray's tenure as Blues coach. The franchise replaced the 58-year-old Murray on Saturday, hoping a younger man can better motivate a youthful roster that's underachieved. Davis Payne , 40, coach of the Blues' AHL affiliate in Peoria, was appointed interim head coach and was to coach St. Louis at home Saturday. "We really need to get our young people to be better players," team president John Davidson said.
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NEWS
October 2, 2014
We don't have enough evidence to declare the process for selecting a candidate to replace new Baltimore Development Corp. head William Cole a "travesty," as nine of the passed-over hopefuls did in a letter to the City Council. But we can certainly declare it disgraceful and most definitely not in keeping with recently enacted reforms that promised a transparent, community led process for filling council vacancies. Fourteen candidates, including many with strong records of public service, spent four hours explaining their qualifications to a panel of community leaders, business owners and two council members, all of whom were selected by Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young under a new protocol for filling council vacancies.
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NEWS
December 17, 2013
In response to the article "Replace city jail, lawmakers urge" (Dec. 12), are they serious? Half a billion dollars to replace the jail? The jail is not the problem. The jailers are the problem. And the "state legislative commission" is planning to rob every Maryland taxpayer instead of correcting the corrections officers. Ludicrous! Jim Nealey, Severna Park - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
When Orioles first baseman Steve Pearce was sidelined for five games last week, his absence left a big hole in the lineup. Nobody realized it more than manager Buck Showalter. "He's in a little bit different stage of his career where people are counting on him, and he's kind of become a guy that we're leaning on," Showalter said. "That's what I've tried to relay to him, that you're a valuable part of this club. " Pearce, who was released by the Orioles earlier this season - and for the first six years of his career was the definition of a replacement player - has been one of several unlikely contributors for a team that won the American League East crown and is preparing to start the postseason on Thursday at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | February 3, 2010
The Maryland GreenHawks of the Premier Basketball League promoted Chad Warren to head coach, replacing Otis Hailey , who died of kidney failure Saturday. "This opportunity is bittersweet," Warren said. "No one wants to get a chance from an injury or even more serious a death. My prayers are with Otis and his family. However, I'm going to make the best of this situation and continue where Otis left off." Capitals: The Washington Capitals recalled defenseman Karl Alzner from the Hershey Bears of the American Hockey League.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | December 14, 1992
The State Highway Administration has replaced more than half of the 520 acres of woodland it cleared within the Severn River watershed for new roads and interchanges.Charles Adams, director for environmental design for the SHA, said the agency is to reforest and landscape another 250 acres within the next year.But are the trees being planted in the right place? And should mature forests be replaced with seedlings?Lina Vlavianos, a member of the Severn River Commission, is not so sure. She wants the commission, an advisory panel appointed by the county executive and Annapolis mayor, to review SHA policies and the 1989 law that requires state agencies to reforest.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | October 29, 1993
Parents and teachers concerned about student drinking will have a voice on Carroll County's liquor board with the appointment of John P. Buchheister Jr., county commissioners said this week."
BUSINESS
By Carrie Masen-Draffen | January 11, 2004
I work for a major heating and air-conditioning company. I had to buy $3,000 worth of tools, including drills and torches, to perform my job. The tools were stolen, and the company refuses to replace them. Is this legal? This answer's going to hurt. The company can legally refuse to replace the tools. On the flip side, if the tools had belonged to the company, and you lost them or they were stolen, the company couldn't legally ask you for replacement money. It's not unheard of for companies to require employees to have their own tools, especially if they are common ones.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
Here's the deal for Glen Burnie homeowners whose sidewalks look like gravel pits: You pay one-fourth of the bill, you get a new sidewalk.People whose homes fall within the Glen Burnie Improvement Association boundaries will be eligible for sidewalk replacements under a pilot program the county is eyeing as a potential model for other areas.The program will repave $50,000 worth, about 1,600 to 2,000 linear feet, of broken sidewalks in Glen Burnie. The county will pay half, the community group one-quarter and the homeowner the remaining quarter.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO and VITO STELLINO,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1996
NEW YORK -- Jeff Lewis, an obscure quarterback from Northern Arizona, one day could be thrust into one of the toughest situations in sports: trying to replace a legend.As the NFL wrapped up the final four rounds of its draft yesterday, Lewis was a most intriguing pick.Lewis, who passed for 2,426 yards before breaking his right collarbone last year, was selected on the fourth round by the Denver Broncos and will be groomed to replace John Elway.Elway, 35, who recently signed a record five-year, $29.5 million deal, may only play three more years, and the Broncos must begin to think about replacing him.Nobody suggests Lewis is another Elway.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Campaigns on Baltimore County's east side are still in full swing, but one outcome is already certain: For the first time in nearly half a century, voters get a new state senator. Democratic Sen. Norman Stone, who took office in 1967, is retiring from the General Assembly. Fellow Democrat John Olszewski Jr., currently a state delegate; Republican Johnny Ray Salling, a steelworker; and unaffiliated candidate Scott Collier are competing to replace him. Stone, who entered the Senate the year Spiro Agnew became governor, is its longest-serving member.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Days after Ravens left tackle Eugene Monroe was barely able to hobble back to the huddle against the Cleveland Browns, he underwent arthroscopic knee surgery to address the issue. Although Monroe isn't expected to be sidelined for an extended period of time, Ravens head coach John Harbaugh said on Wednesday Monroe won't play on Sunday against the Carolina Panthers and could miss additional games. With the left tackle situation having reached emergency status, Monroe will be replaced in the starting lineup by undrafted rookie James Hurst.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The acting executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore has dropped her bid to become the organization's permanent head, even as the search to fill the spot continues. Kelly Neel's announced departure from the GLCCB, effective Oct. 3, surprised the group's board of directors, which had short-listed her as a finalist among a narrowing pool of contenders for the permanent job, said Mike McCarthy, the board's president. McCarthy said there were "points of contention" between the board and Neel, but he didn't think "it was at the level that she felt her value was questioned.
NEWS
By Allison Pendell Jones | September 22, 2014
Big changes are afoot in city and state government, changes that could affect Baltimore's families for a long time to come. Parents who want strong schools, safe streets, green spaces and walkable neighborhoods need to step up and make their voices heard so we don't lose momentum in the effort to make Baltimore a more family-friendly city. On Tuesday, a committee selected by Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young will interview candidates for the City Council seat vacated by Bill Cole, who recently resigned to lead the Baltimore Development Corporation.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 21, 2014
The man-made catastrophe known as the "Affordable Care Act" and "Obamacare" still lurks. And nobody should interpret the absence of daily negative headlines as a sign the law's myriad problems have been rectified, or that there is substance to Harry Reid's claim of "untrue" horror stories following the law's implementation. So, how much damage has been inflicted now that gross ineptitude in foreign policy has replaced gross ineptitude in health care policy? Let me count the ways … and lies.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The news that Chris Davis had been suspended 25 games for a violation of Major League Baseball's drug policy was still fresh Friday morning, as was the reality that the Orioles likely will be without one of their power bats for the rest of the year. But with the first game of the club's split doubleheader against the New York Yankees hours away, Orioles manager Buck Showalter had to quickly turn his focus to his lineup card. A club closing in on its first division title since 1997 already has overcome several obstacles, including season-ending injuries to cornerstone players Matt Wieters and Manny Machado, but now the Orioles' postseason dreams will have to be realized without Davis, whose suspension would end, at the earliest, late in the American League Championship Series.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1997
A replacement for Maryland's top prison official likely will be named within a week from within the state's law enforcement community, Gov. Parris N. Glendening said yesterday.While the governor refused to discuss specific candidates to replace Secretary of Public Safety and Correctional Services Bishop L. Robinson, speculation among legislative leaders and others familiar with the state prison system yesterday focused on Col. David B. Mitchell, superintendent of Maryland State Police.Other possible replacements mentioned yesterday include Stuart O. Simms, state secretary of juvenile justice; Richard A. Lanham Sr., commissioner of the state Division of Correction; LaMont W. Flanagan, commissioner of the state Division of Pretrial Detention and Services; and Patricia Kushwa, chairwoman of the Maryland Parole Commission.
NEWS
By Garrett Epps | April 21, 2010
"This was a tale, old soldier, so well told!" These lines, from Homer's Odyssey, might have been written of Justice John Paul Stevens, who recently announced his impending retirement from the Supreme Court. He served 35 years, and for at least the past two decades he has been the court's strongest voice of reason. Now President Barack Obama must replace the irreplaceable; his choice will powerfully shape America's story for decades to come. Commentators describe Justice Stevens, who turned 90 on Tuesday, as the court's leading judicial liberal, but this is nonsense.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is expected Tuesday to formally begin the process of finding a replacement for former Councilman William H. Cole IV, who resigned to become head of the Baltimore Development Corporation. Much is at stake for Mr. Cole's district, which encompasses a diverse array of neighborhoods and the city's central business district, but much is also at stake for the council itself to show that it has learned from the debacle that ensued last time it had a vacancy.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Baltimore non-profit organization that works to reduce infant mortality in the city lost its federal funding and may shut its doors, the group said Monday. Baltimore Healthy Start Inc. reported the nearly $2.5 million was most of the annual budget, used for programs in Rosemont, Edmondson Village, Sandtown/Winchester, Middle East and Highlandtown. The largely African American communities have higher infant mortality rates. For the first time this year grants were awarded as part of a competitive process that considered evidence-based approaches to improving women's health and access to care and improving and tracking the quality of services provided, among other areas, Health Resources and Services Administration spokesman Martin Kramer said.
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