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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Left-hander Troy Patton -- who has allowed runs in five of his last six relief outings -- has started throwing bullpen sessions, hoping that the patterned repetitions can help refine his mechanics. Relievers usually don't throw regular side sessions because they're on call on a daily basis, but Patton said he wanted to start after struggling with his fastball command. “I'm just trying to get back to what made me good,” Patton said. “I really just wanted to it to work on duplicating mechanics because my missed haven't been smaller than last year.
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SPORTS
By Pete Barrett and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Jamion Christian and his Mount St. Mary's team spent time together over the summer reading about basketball. One day the Mountaineers read that if you want to be very good at a skill you need to repeat it 10,000 times. "And so our guys all made the commitment to make 10,000 shots on their own each month," Christian said.  The work has paid off.  Over the past 11 games, the Mount (9-12, 5-3 NEC) is shooting 41.3 percent from 3-point range while averaging 10.6 3-pointers made per game.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tess Lewis and By Tess Lewis,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
Repetition, by Alain Robbe-Grillet. Translated by Richard Howard. Grove Press. 168 pages. $23. Alain Robbe-Grillet's latest novel, Repetition, is just that: a repetition, with variations, of his best-known novels, The Erasers (1953), Jealousy (1955) and The Voyeur (1957). The characteristics of his fiction -- intersecting and overlapping stories, a fluid sense of narrative time, crimes that may or may not have been committed, an atmosphere of dread, and clever literary and mythological allusions -- lay at the heart of the French literary movement he fathered, the nouveau roman, or the new novel.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Left-hander Troy Patton -- who has allowed runs in five of his last six relief outings -- has started throwing bullpen sessions, hoping that the patterned repetitions can help refine his mechanics. Relievers usually don't throw regular side sessions because they're on call on a daily basis, but Patton said he wanted to start after struggling with his fastball command. “I'm just trying to get back to what made me good,” Patton said. “I really just wanted to it to work on duplicating mechanics because my missed haven't been smaller than last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | May 21, 1998
The title of the 14th annual resident artists' exhibition at the Howard County Center for the Arts is "Repetition with Variation," and it has more than one application. All of the show's artists use repetition and variation as a design principle in one way or another. Repetition applies to the show as an annual resident artist exhibit. And variation applies since this year's show includes eight nonresident artists connected in some way with the center, either as Howard County Arts Council board members or members of the council's administrative team.
NEWS
By Robert H. Deluty | January 18, 1994
Over time, he and his brother,Sole survivors of unspeakable trauma,Replaced closeness, support, laughterWith anger, envy, bitterness.Unforgotten, unforgiven sibling sinsKept them distant, aloneUntil the elder died.His grown sons witnessed as childrenThis relentless brotherly erosion, andNow appear incapable of haltingA pride-driven repetition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester | December 20, 2007
Nellie McKay comes to Rams Head Tavern at 8 tonight. The performer-singer-songwriter-raconteur is known for her witty comments between songs and vows that she will never repeat the way in which she performs a song, claiming that she forgets her own lyrics. All jokes aside, the comedic artist takes pride in the absence of repetition at her shows. The Mills Family Band will also perform. Rams Head Tavern is at 33 West St., Annapolis. Tickets are $25. Call 410-268-4545 or go to tickets.ramsheadon stage.
NEWS
December 1, 1992
The Anne Arundel County school board doesn't hold meetings. It stages marathons.The board's daytime sessions, which start at 9, routinely drone on for 10 hours. The evening meetings begin at 7:30 and do not end until the wee hours of the morning.It would be one thing if the meetings were packed with riveting discussions of critical issues. But usually the lengthiest debates are deadly dull and insignificant.Should it really take an hour to approve a simple purchase order? Or two hours to talk about property easements?
NEWS
December 1, 1992
The Anne Arundel County school board doesn't hold meetings. It stages marathons.The board's daytime sessions, which start at 9, routinely drone on for 10 hours. The evening meetings begin at 7:30 and do not end until the wee hours of the morning. It would be one thing if the meetings were packed with riveting discussions of critical issues. But usually the lengthiest debates are deadly dull and insignificant. Should it really take an hour to approve a simple purchase order? Or two hours to talk about property easements?
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 8, 1994
It was in 1953, more than a TV generation ago, that the first lady of TV comedy, Lucille Ball, "gave birth" to Little Ricky on "I Love Lucy." Tonight, this generation's first lady of sitcoms, Roseanne Arnold, features an eagerly awaited birth on HER show, "Roseanne." However, it isn't her baby. It's her sister's.* "CBS Schoolbreak Special" (4-5 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Missy Crider and Tom Everett Scott star as young lovers whose sexual activity is encumbered by her discovery that he's given her a sexually transmitted disease.
SPORTS
By Dr. Milford Marchant Jr., Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
The rules of lacrosse allow for both player-to-player and stick-to-player contact, leaving players susceptible to acute traumatic injuries like those commonly seen in football and ice hockey. However, as lacrosse continues to become a year-round game, chronic repetitive injuries like those typical in baseball, tennis and swimming may begin to surface. Lacrosse has grown rapidly in the past 10 years. According to a recent survey by US Lacrosse, the sport's national governing body, participation has risen by an average of 10 percent a year since 2002, with more than 600,000 people now playing at various levels.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Sam Koch is master of the mundane. Give the Ravens punter a tedious chore and he will excel at it. Give him a boring, repetitive task and he will turn it into his own form of artwork. Whether it's maintaining his back yard in Westminster, playing corn hole in the team's spacious locker room, or dropping the perfect pooch punt in enemy territory, Koch wants to be the best. In order to be the best, he pays an inordinate amount of attention to detail. Ever the perfectionist, it was not uncommon for Koch to keep Morgan Cox, his long snapper, late after four-hour practices in training camp to address their timing on snaps or his own drop technique on punts.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
This is the face of Jewish vengeance!" cries the heroine of "Inglourious Basterds" to a cinema filled with horrified Nazis. If someone had photographed me at that moment, they would have seen the face of Jewish boredom. Quentin Tarantino's Second World War extravaganza about a band of Jewish-American commandos bedeviling the German army and a French Jew seeking justice for the Nazi slaughter of her family upsets expectations because it is soporific. By now it's a given that Tarantino's films are invitations to the Dark Continent of Quentin, a cinema-fed fantasyland in which various tour guides offer self-consciously colorful chatter interrupted by abrupt blasts of action.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | August 8, 2008
Spilling out sports media notes while making sure I have enough coasters so that I don't leave five rings on the coffee table during the Olympics: *Here is perhaps the best way to appreciate just how many hours of the Beijing Olympics NBC is televising: The 3,600 hours carried on its six networks and Web site nbcolympics.com are 1,000 more than the number of hours televised in the United States in all previous Summer Games combined. NBC said 2,900 hours will be live, even with the 12-hour time difference between Beijing and the eastern U.S. That means some prime events have been scheduled for the benefit of Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester | December 20, 2007
Nellie McKay comes to Rams Head Tavern at 8 tonight. The performer-singer-songwriter-raconteur is known for her witty comments between songs and vows that she will never repeat the way in which she performs a song, claiming that she forgets her own lyrics. All jokes aside, the comedic artist takes pride in the absence of repetition at her shows. The Mills Family Band will also perform. Rams Head Tavern is at 33 West St., Annapolis. Tickets are $25. Call 410-268-4545 or go to tickets.ramsheadon stage.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | September 2, 2007
One artist painstakingly glues strands of her hair into the shapes of cylinders and circles. Another dabs tens of thousands of individual dots of pigment across her canvas in neat rows. A third spends months collecting rare four-leaf clovers to paste onto her elaborate enameled collages. Not only are the materials unusual, the very willingness to endure the kind of mind-numbing repetitiveness and tedium required to turn them into art may seem like a kind of madness, akin to the obsessive-compulsive disorders studied by psychiatrists.
SPORTS
By Mary Beth Kozak | August 17, 2002
Position: Fullback College: Alabama Who he is: This rookie free agent played in 31 of 33 games in three seasons at Alabama. In 10 games his senior year, he carried 97 times. In the weight room, he set a record by squatting 575 pounds, and had an incline press of 405 pounds. He went to high school at DeMatha in Hyattsville. What he does in his free time: "Watch movies. I'm a movie guy. Scarface is my favorite." What he has learned at camp: "You must keep your focus and every repetition counts and no matter what you're doing, somebody's watching.
NEWS
January 27, 1998
Shinichi Suzuki,99, who pioneered a method for teaching toddlers to play musical instruments the same way they learn to speak -- through imitation and constant repetition -- died yesterday in Matsumoto, Japan.Since it was introduced in the 1950s, hundreds of thousands of young musicians have learned to play using the Suzuki method, performing on miniature violins and other instruments with remarkable precision.Hilla Limann,64, a former Ghana president who was ousted in a 1981 coup after a brief rule and tried to reclaim the post in elections 11 years later, died Friday in Accra, Ghana.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | July 11, 2007
Shepherdstown, W.Va -- Right here, right now, in a small theater nestled in the Appalachian mountains of West Virginia, Big Brother is watching us. But, there's a trade-off: We're also watching him. If you go The Contemporary American Theater Festival runs through July 29 in Shepherdstown, W.Va. Single tickets cost $26 to $36; subscriptions cost $81 to $120. Call 800-999-2283 or go to catf.org.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | May 23, 2007
Because she is a woman, Madeleine Keesing's meticulously executed paintings composed of thousands of individual drops of paint sometimes have been described as "feminist" works. Because she adheres to a rigorously simple technique, her art has been analyzed in terms of "minimalist" practice. Neither of these ways of talking about Keesing's work really gets to the heart of the matter, however. Her newest paintings, on view at Goya Contemporary, fairly shout their main reason for being. It is color, color, color!
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