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By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 2007
VIENNA -- Pope Benedict XVI stood silently yesterday before a large stone monument to Austrian Jews slaughtered in the Holocaust, offering a gesture of what he described as "sadness and repentance." The visit was a significant start to a three-day pilgrimage to Austria to lend succor to a Catholic Church still troubled by a series of sexual abuse scandals, plummeting membership and sapped influence. The visit to Austria will allow the pope to emphasize some of his favorite themes, including what he sees as the essential Christian identity of Europe, particularly as it is undermined by secularism and fast-growing Muslim immigration.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Visitors to the Phillips Collection, the exceptional modern art museum near Washington's Dupont Circle, may do a double-take when they stop to admire El Greco's "The Repentant St. Peter. " The bold painting of the apostle, made around 1600, is currently positioned between round archways. Behind them are two blowups of sections in the El Greco work - Peter's hands, a small detail from the corner of the original. These works, large archival inkjet prints of digital photographs by Baltimore-based artist Bernhard Hildebrandt, are blurry, as if seen through the wrong side of thick glasses.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | December 27, 1990
LONDON -- The 22-month-old Islamic death sentence on author Salman Rushdie still stands despite his repentance this week for offending Moslems with his book "The Satanic Verses," according to spiritual leaders in Iran and Britain.They rejected Mr. Rushdie's renewal of his own Islamic faith and his promise not to allow publication of a paperback version of the book as sufficient grounds for lifting the death threat.The author's shift would not change the "divine ruling" that his blasphemy must be punished by death, said Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme religious ruler of Iran.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2013
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African-American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. In none of those things was he unique, so no, his name should ring no bells.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN STAFF Sun photographer Amy Davis contributed to this story | July 31, 1998
Jesus Hi-Way Man" is on the road again in his Chevy 1500, homemade trailer in tow, the whole rig plastered with Bible verses, evangelical aphorisms and admonitions to repent."We have to work because the night is coming," warns Jesus Hi-Way Man, whose off-road identity is the evangelist Allen Fulwood, an elder in the Love of God Apostolic Faith Church, where founder and pastor Bishop Chapell Petersen ordained him as a preacher."God's Word on the Hi-Way" is delivered in black letters on neat white plaques like the nameplates of home improvement contractors."
FEATURES
By Mary Otto and Mary Otto,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 17, 1995
Contrition for the past fills the air.Japan's government fumbles for the right word to express remorse for World War II. Robert McNamara issues a belated mea culpa for his role in prolonging the Vietnam war. The Evangelical Lutheran Church apologizes for the anti-Semitism of its namesake, Martin Luther.Now the Southern Baptists, the country's largest Protestant denomination, are struggling to make amends. Next week, they are going to Atlanta calling for a mass apology for their history of slavery and racism.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
The two highest profile pitchmen for Question 6, Rev. Donte Hickman Sr. and Rev. Delman Coates, who in my opinion are not worthy of the title "Reverend," gave this reason for their support: "Let the church be the church, the state be the state, and God be the judge" ("Voices for marriage freedom," Nov. 11). This is nothing more than the blind leading the blind with both falling into the ditch. We have a very important warning about ministers who come in sheep's clothing. Inwardly, they are ferocious wolves who can be identified by their fruit.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
I write in response to Dan Rodricks ' column, "Same-sex unions: What would Jesus do?" (Oct. 25). I more or less agree with his befuddlement with the "extravagant manifestations" of modern day religious Christianity. Nevertheless, his personal opinion concerning what Jesus would do in regard to homosexual marriage runs counter to Christian doctrine. The Bible preaches repentance, not unconditional love to those in willful rebellion against God. Mr. Rodricks makes the common error of confusing God's unconditional love for those who have repented and turned to him in faith, as manifested in Christ's sacrificial death on the cross, with a generalized, sentimental acceptance of all behaviors that dismissed the evils of sin and the severity of God's response to it. This is a fatal mistake.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2000
Jews begin at sundown tonight the New Year celebration of Rosh Hashana, marking the beginning of the High Holy Days with prayers and rituals handed down through millennia. The prayers might seem dry and repetitive, and the traditions and rituals rote but, Rabbi Nina Beth Cardin says, there's value in going through the motions - the feelings will follow. Cardin, director of Jewish life at the Jewish Community Center and an author of growing acclaim, explores the possibilities offered by Jewish tradition in her new book, "The Tapestry of Jewish Time."
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1998
More than 50 years ago, there was silence. Yesterday, there was dialogue.Returning from a 10-day pilgrimage to Jerusalem and Rome, Cardinal William H. Keeler and Rabbi Joel H. Zaiman stood on a downtown rooftop, shared their interfaith experience and grappled with wounds of the past: the horror of the Holocaust."
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 16, 2013
When Lance Armstrong met last month with his own personal Javert , Travis Tygart of the anti-doping agency, he said after the frustrating meeting, "You don't hold the keys to my redemption. "Only one person holds the keys to my redemption, and that's me," he said, according to reporting in The Wall Street Journal. Mr. Armstrong was vacationing in Hawaii over Christmas, where Oprah Winfrey has a home, and it was then that she reached out to him. They met for lunch, and he agreed to a come-clean interview with her. Upon reflection, it appears, Mr. Armstrong decided that Oprah holds the key to his redemption.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
The two highest profile pitchmen for Question 6, Rev. Donte Hickman Sr. and Rev. Delman Coates, who in my opinion are not worthy of the title "Reverend," gave this reason for their support: "Let the church be the church, the state be the state, and God be the judge" ("Voices for marriage freedom," Nov. 11). This is nothing more than the blind leading the blind with both falling into the ditch. We have a very important warning about ministers who come in sheep's clothing. Inwardly, they are ferocious wolves who can be identified by their fruit.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
I write in response to Dan Rodricks ' column, "Same-sex unions: What would Jesus do?" (Oct. 25). I more or less agree with his befuddlement with the "extravagant manifestations" of modern day religious Christianity. Nevertheless, his personal opinion concerning what Jesus would do in regard to homosexual marriage runs counter to Christian doctrine. The Bible preaches repentance, not unconditional love to those in willful rebellion against God. Mr. Rodricks makes the common error of confusing God's unconditional love for those who have repented and turned to him in faith, as manifested in Christ's sacrificial death on the cross, with a generalized, sentimental acceptance of all behaviors that dismissed the evils of sin and the severity of God's response to it. This is a fatal mistake.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Arin Gencer and Dan Connolly and Arin Gencer,dan.connolly@baltsun.com and Arin.Gencer@baltsun.com | September 2, 2009
New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez made an unexpected visit to 500 students at a Baltimore County school to deliver an anti-steroid message Tuesday, months after admitting publicly that he used performance-enhancing drugs earlier in his career. At the time of his admission, Rodriguez vowed to turn his past transgressions into a positive lesson for young athletes, and he appears to be attempting to uphold that promise by discreetly speaking to select students this season. It's part of the agreement, however, that the talks not be covered by the news media.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 2007
VIENNA -- Pope Benedict XVI stood silently yesterday before a large stone monument to Austrian Jews slaughtered in the Holocaust, offering a gesture of what he described as "sadness and repentance." The visit was a significant start to a three-day pilgrimage to Austria to lend succor to a Catholic Church still troubled by a series of sexual abuse scandals, plummeting membership and sapped influence. The visit to Austria will allow the pope to emphasize some of his favorite themes, including what he sees as the essential Christian identity of Europe, particularly as it is undermined by secularism and fast-growing Muslim immigration.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 29, 2006
GALWAY, Ireland -- As an unsupervised young chief trader in Singapore in 1995, Nicholas W. Leeson lost $1.3 billion in frenzied trades in Japanese stock futures and bonds, destroying his employer, the 233-year-old Barings Bank, which had Queen Elizabeth II as a customer. Now, Leeson, having served four years in prison and survived a bout with colon cancer, has managed to turn those money-losing bets into a money-making enterprise - warning bankers of their continuing vulnerability to rogue traders.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Although some leaders of Baltimore's Jewish community praised yesterday's Vatican statement on the Holocaust as a step forward in interfaith relations, others expressed disappointment that the Roman Catholic Church did not go further.The statement, which expressed deep regret for the "errors and failures" of Catholics during the Holocaust, nonetheless defended the role of Pope Pius XII, who has been accused of staying silent in the face of the deportation of Jews and their extermination in Nazi death camps.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | February 13, 1991
Millions of Americans will mark the beginning of Lent by dabbing ashes on their foreheads today. But for many more, the Lenten disciplines of prayer and reflection have been a daily routine for the past month."
BUSINESS
By Joanne Cleaver | July 11, 2004
Educators call them "teachable moments." Parents call them "getting common sense." Cops call them "scared straight." There are plenty of terms for the moment of truth when you realize that things have got to change right here, right now. Accountants, financial advisers and credit counselors don't have a snappy label for the moments when their clients sit up in shock, but they witness these revelations all the time. Sometimes it's a five-figure credit-card bill. For others, it's the sickening realization that they owe the IRS an awful lot of money.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2003
Drawing on some of the most troubling events around the world of recent months -- war, terrorist attacks, scandals and a hurricane -- several Columbia rabbis will urge congregants to better themselves and the world around them as they embark on the Jewish new year. "Rosh Hashana is a time of introspection, of reconnecting," said Rabbi Susan Grossman of Beth Shalom Synagogue. "The questions I will ask are, `What is our role and responsibilities as Jews and our role in reaching out to others?"
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