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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 30, 2008
NASA has delayed plans to launch a repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope next month because a science data computer stopped working over the weekend, officials said yesterday. The mission, planned for launch Oct. 14, will not launch before mid-February, a delay that will cost the Hubble program at least $10 million a month, according to NASA officials. In the meantime, the telescope is unable to transmit any scientific data to the ground. Engineers at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt are working this week to transfer the work of Hubble's malfunctioning science data downlink computer to a backup system so they can resume science operations within a few weeks.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | February 22, 2010
When he applied for the No. 2 job at the Space Telescope Science Institute, John Grunsfeld hit on a way to stand out from other candidates. First, he loaded a cover letter and a resume onto a memory stick. Then he took it with him into space. The astrophysicist, then on his third mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope, waited until the space shuttle's robot arm had grabbed the orbiting observatory before he fired off his note. "He actually used the words, 'I am holding Hubble hostage until you read my application,' " the institute's director, Matt Mountain, recalled.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | October 27, 2006
The future of the Hubble Space Telescope hangs in the balance today in Washington as top NASA managers weigh the feasibility and risks of sending shuttle astronauts on a fifth and final servicing mission to the observatory. Michael Griffin, the agency administrator, is scheduled to announce Tuesday at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt whether he'll order the mission. "There is talk about very little else at the moment. Everybody wants to know what's happening," said Matt Mountain, director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, which manages Hubble science.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
The picture on Adam Riess' computer monitor arrived fresh from the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. It was the fading light from an exploding star, potentially a key piece of evidence in his yearslong investigation of one of the greatest of all cosmological mysteries - dark energy. But as the Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist waited for the next image to arrive, an e-mail message popped onto his screen. In an instant, he tumbled into what he describes as one of those "uh-oh" moments when everything changes.
NEWS
November 1, 2006
NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin's decision yesterday to approve a repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope has the potential to expand and extend the observatory's reach into the universe. But that's not the only reason to applaud. It's a nod toward the importance of generating science and advancing projects with that aim, especially when traveling to Mars has become the latest fascination in Washington. Hubble may have popularized astronomy with its stunning array of images from space.
NEWS
December 11, 1993
With the completion of the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission yesterday, NASA has done more than just fix the orbiting telescope's blurry vision. It has shown a skeptical public it still knows how to get things done, and its apparent success should restore some luster to the space agency's tarnished image.The minutely choreographed telescope repair schedule, which involved 11 separate operations and a record-breaking five spacewalks by two teams of astronauts, was the most complex space repair mission ever undertaken by NASA.
NEWS
January 19, 1994
With proof in hand of a successful Hubble Space Telescope repair mission, NASA has shown that it can still be the "can-do" agency that put men on the moon and sent probes to the farthest planets. Last week's "first light" tests through the refurbished instrument returned razor-sharp pictures that met or exceeded scientists' most sanguine predictions for clarity and resolution.The planning and execution of the complex mission is already being ranked as one of the space age's most spectacular successes to date.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | November 17, 2005
WASHINGTON -- NASA got what it wanted - and more - yesterday when the Senate approved a $16.5 billion annual spending plan for the space agency in an otherwise very tight budget year. The money will pay for the start-up of NASA's new moon-Mars venture, more space shuttle flights, a repair mission to the Hubble telescope and other programs. The spending plan for 2006, which passed 94-5, is a slight increase over the current budget. But the agency is looking at an expensive transition in the next few years as it tries to balance the cost of ending its shuttle program and International Space Station construction with the planned voyages to the moon and Mars.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
THE REASON for NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe's refusal to send astronauts into space to retrofit the Hubble Space Telescope can be summed up in two words: too risky. But a new report by a panel of experts has undercut his argument, finding that a manned repair mission is only slightly more risky than planned flights to the International Space Station. The panel also raised significant doubts that an unmanned robotics mission could do the job. Fixing Hubble so it can continue to inform and enhance our knowledge of stars, planets and deep space is the objective here, and Mr. O'Keefe should put his money on astronauts, not machines.
NEWS
March 15, 2004
HUBBLE SPACE Telescope fans, enjoy those glorious pictures from the great beyond while you can. The photos shared with the public last week were beauties -- a kaleidoscope of competing galaxies and nascent stars. U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski of Maryland is valiantly trying to extend the Hubble's working life, despite a NASA decision to the contrary. And we can't help but cheer her on. Ms. Mikulski is waging an uphill fight, notwithstanding Hubble's stellar scientific contributions, popularity worldwide and continued slam-dunk performances.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 4, 2009
Seven astronauts are stranded in orbit after their shuttle is damaged during launch. Unable to repair the ship, they hunker down with dwindling supplies while four more astronauts board a second spacecraft and blast off on a daring rescue mission. NASA executives would like to keep this scenario in the realm of science fiction. But they're preparing for it just the same on the slim chance the shuttle Atlantis is crippled during the May 11 repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. A second shuttle - Endeavour - is poised for liftoff from Cape Canaveral if there's a call for help from Atlantis.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 30, 2008
NASA has delayed plans to launch a repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope next month because a science data computer stopped working over the weekend, officials said yesterday. The mission, planned for launch Oct. 14, will not launch before mid-February, a delay that will cost the Hubble program at least $10 million a month, according to NASA officials. In the meantime, the telescope is unable to transmit any scientific data to the ground. Engineers at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt are working this week to transfer the work of Hubble's malfunctioning science data downlink computer to a backup system so they can resume science operations within a few weeks.
NEWS
November 1, 2006
NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin's decision yesterday to approve a repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope has the potential to expand and extend the observatory's reach into the universe. But that's not the only reason to applaud. It's a nod toward the importance of generating science and advancing projects with that aim, especially when traveling to Mars has become the latest fascination in Washington. Hubble may have popularized astronomy with its stunning array of images from space.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | October 27, 2006
The future of the Hubble Space Telescope hangs in the balance today in Washington as top NASA managers weigh the feasibility and risks of sending shuttle astronauts on a fifth and final servicing mission to the observatory. Michael Griffin, the agency administrator, is scheduled to announce Tuesday at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt whether he'll order the mission. "There is talk about very little else at the moment. Everybody wants to know what's happening," said Matt Mountain, director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, which manages Hubble science.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | November 17, 2005
WASHINGTON -- NASA got what it wanted - and more - yesterday when the Senate approved a $16.5 billion annual spending plan for the space agency in an otherwise very tight budget year. The money will pay for the start-up of NASA's new moon-Mars venture, more space shuttle flights, a repair mission to the Hubble telescope and other programs. The spending plan for 2006, which passed 94-5, is a slight increase over the current budget. But the agency is looking at an expensive transition in the next few years as it tries to balance the cost of ending its shuttle program and International Space Station construction with the planned voyages to the moon and Mars.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
Space scientists are peering into a future without the Hubble telescope, and they don't like what they see. If NASA lets the renowned observatory die in orbit, they say, it would prematurely slam the shutters on a unique and vital window on the heavens that might not open again for decades. Other instruments - the orbiting Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope, powerful mountaintop observatories like the mighty Keck II in Hawaii and others less well-known - will continue to make important discoveries.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
IT HAS BEEN our eye on the universe, peering farther into space than had ever been done before. A billion times more! With its cameras clicking and spectrographs turning, the Hubble Space Telescope offers stargazers and scientists a view once only imagined. And what a razzle-dazzle, nerve-firing view - the largest volcano in the solar system, a roiling storm on Saturn, black holes, dying stars, galaxies in the making. This bus-sized telescope in the sky has popularized the science of astronomy in a palpable way for those of us who can't define spectroscopy.
NEWS
October 8, 1993
Perkins-Elmer, the Hughes Aircraft Co. subsidiary that manufactured the nearsighted Hubble Space Telescope mirror, has agreed to pay the government part of the cost of repairing the faulty spacecraft. The Justice Department has reached a $25 million settlement that a NASA official called "fair and reasonable."That judgment may be premature. It will cost the government about $150 million to fix the Hubble telescope now that it's already in orbit, a figure that doesn't even include the cost of the shuttle repair mission itself or any unforeseen problems.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
THE REASON for NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe's refusal to send astronauts into space to retrofit the Hubble Space Telescope can be summed up in two words: too risky. But a new report by a panel of experts has undercut his argument, finding that a manned repair mission is only slightly more risky than planned flights to the International Space Station. The panel also raised significant doubts that an unmanned robotics mission could do the job. Fixing Hubble so it can continue to inform and enhance our knowledge of stars, planets and deep space is the objective here, and Mr. O'Keefe should put his money on astronauts, not machines.
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