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March 15, 2013
Maj. Phillip Kasten has been appointed to the position of chief deputy in the Carroll County Sheriff's Office as Sheriff Kenneth Tregoning announced an internal reorganization in the office last week. Sheriff Tregoning also consolidated the Investigative and Field Services bureaus and appointed Maj. Thomas Long as Bureau Chief. Kasten fills a position that has been vacant since the retirement of Col. Robert Keefer on July 9, 2008. The chief deputy will oversee the daily operational and administrative responsibilities for the Departments' of Sheriff Services and Corrections.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
A plan by Anne Arundel County school officials to realign an office that monitors minority achievement prompted tense moments during Wednesday's school board meeting, heightened by a former school board member referring to interim Superintendent Mamie Perkins as "Aunt Jemima. " Last week, Perkins announced plans to reorganize the system's Office of Equity and Human Relations, an office that has been a liaison between the school system and the community on issues related to achievement and discipline gaps for minority students.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Chemical company W.R. Grace & Co. said Tuesday that its reorganization plan could be approved in January — nearly 10 years after it entered bankruptcy protection. The Columbia-based company, which filed for bankruptcy in Delaware because of numerous asbestos lawsuits, said in a statement that Judge Judith K. Fitzgerald revealed in a status conference that she expects to issue a ruling next month. The judge had hoped to do so by the end of this year, according to W.R. Grace.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
Columbia-based W.R. Grace & Co. cleared the last major hurdle Monday to its exit from nearly 13 years of bankruptcy protection, settling the final remaining appeal to its reorganization plan. The chemical maker said in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing that it agreed to pay $129 million to the lenders who hold its pre-bankruptcy bank debt, in addition to the distributions called for in the reorganization plan. If the U.S. Bankruptcy Court approves the settlement, the lenders will withdraw their appeal, Grace said.
NEWS
April 7, 1994
Unlike his numerous, more impulsive predecessors, School Superintendent Walter G. Amprey was able to resist an urge to reorganize the city public school system for nearly three years. But now that he has caught the bug, he is pledging to do a major house-cleaning in the name of improving education. As an opener, he has downgraded his two top deputies. By the time this reorganization is implemented in September, more than 100 administrators may have been transferred, demoted or terminated.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | December 31, 1994
Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. creditors and stockholders yesterday presented the company with a reorganization plan that could allow the Joppa-based clothier to leave bankruptcy protection by the summer.Merry-Go-Round analysts had predicted the retailer's bankruptcy case would drag on for at least another year. Yesterday's proposal, while still tentative and requiring approval the court, also appeared to be blessed by the company."We were reaching a point in the road where things could have become very contentious," said Wilbur L. Ross Jr., senior managing director of Rothschild Inc., a financial adviser to the company's equity holders, of the negotiations between the two sides.
BUSINESS
By By Hanah Cho | June 1, 2010
Baltimore-based CitiFinancial, the consumer lending arm of financial giant Citigroup Inc., said Tuesday that it plans to close 330 branches across the U.S., including six in Maryland, as it reorganizes its business and continues to look for a buyer. The move will result in 500 to 600 job cuts, though it's not known how many employees will be affected in Maryland, according to CitiFinancial. Citigroup has been trying to sell CitiFinancial and other distressed assets since last year amid the financial crisis.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | June 30, 1991
When county office workers return to work tomorrow morning, they'll be part of what Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy Jr. calls a "lean, mean governmental machine."More likely, they'll pretty much return to their jobs.The County Commissioners on Thursday afternoon officially unveiled their much talked about -- and little explained -- governmental reorganization with the promise of improved efficiency.But just how that efficiency is to be measured -- and what it means to Carroll residents -- remained unexplained last week.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
When it comes to governmental reorganization, the do-it-now governor wants to do it later.At the first hearing on one of the reorganization plans advanced by House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., aides to Gov. William Donald Schaefer responded with the threat of a veto and a counterproposal that would delay action on such restructuring until a new governor is sworn in."I never like to talk about vetoes during the legislative session," said David R. Iannucci, the governor's chief legislative aide, when asked about that possibility at a House Appropriations Committee hearing.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
Burdened by a $2.7 million financial deficit, the NAACP has dismissed 10 employees and expects to cut the staff at its Northwest Baltimore headquarters by another 10 over the summer.The Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., the civil rights group's executive director, said the moves were part of a major reorganization of the NAACP. He contended that the "financial situation did not trigger the reorganization."However, Dr. Chavis, who became the NAACP's chief executive in April 1993, said:* The organization's general fund was $900,000 in the red last year, adding to an existing deficit.
NEWS
By Ruth Ann Norton | October 30, 2013
What if there was a completely preventable disease that affected one in 38 American children under the age of six and Congress effectively eliminated the funding that supports efforts to eradicate the cause of the disease? There is such a disease - lead poisoning - and Congress did slash funding for lead poisoning prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the most recent federal budget. Every year more than half a million children are poisoned by lead in their homes, leaving them with irreversible brain damage that will affect them for the rest of their lives.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Baltimore-based money manager Legg Mason Inc. will incur charges of $10 million in each of the last two quarters of this year for paying severance and other expenses related to streamlining its business, according to a Wednesday filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. These include shutting down its London-based emerging markets boutique, Esemplia Emerging Markets, as well as reducing the size of a sales office in Canada, said spokeswoman Mary Athridge. These moves are expected to save Legg about $2.5 million per quarter, starting next year, the company said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Members of the state university system's Board of Regents unanimously approved a plan to revitalize Coppin State University at their meeting Friday, setting in motion what is expected to be a comprehensive overhaul of the historically black institution. The board also heard a report on the system's efforts to close the achievement gap between certain groups on each campus, including white males and black males, low-income and high-income students, and "underrepresented minority students" and the majority.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Nearly three dozen workers at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development office in Baltimore - roughly a third of the agency's workforce in Maryland - are being forced to transfer out of state or take a buyout. The choice, which will affect 32 employees at the agency's South Howard Street field office, comes as part of a national reorganization aimed at saving about $45 million a year. The department is consolidating workers in 50 offices nationwide who facilitate the construction and rehabilitation of multifamily housing into 10 offices, HUD spokesman Jerry Brown said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
Bethesda-based Marriott International warned the state that it will lay off 35 employees in June, and potentially several hundred others later in the year, the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Friday. The company's layoff warning notice said it is reorganizing and outsourcing some "information resources" operations. The initial cuts are planned for June 28 in Bethesda, Frederick and Gaithersburg. Marriott said several hundred more employees could be laid off between July and December.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
Maj. Phillip Kasten has been appointed to the position of chief deputy in the Carroll County Sheriff's Office as Sheriff Kenneth Tregoning announced an internal reorganization in the office last week. Sheriff Tregoning also consolidated the Investigative and Field Services bureaus and appointed Maj. Thomas Long as Bureau Chief. Kasten fills a position that has been vacant since the retirement of Col. Robert Keefer on July 9, 2008. The chief deputy will oversee the daily operational and administrative responsibilities for the Departments' of Sheriff Services and Corrections.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Marina Sarris and Timothy J. Mullaney and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Jay Hancock contributed to this article | June 16, 1995
A restructuring of the state Department of Economic and Employment Development turned into a small-scale purge this week, as 16 officials were dismissed and the agency's international division was set to lose its status as a separate division.The largest single move in the reorganization is a shift of the department's division of employment and training, along with 1,200 workers, to the Department of Licensing and Regulation. The new Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation will take over running unemployment insurance programs as well as research functions studying the state's economy.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 6, 1996
Lockheed Martin Corp. yesterday announced a corporate reorganization brought about by the acquisition earlier this year of the the bulk of Loral Corp.On another front, the Bethesda-based defense and aerospace company said it is holding talks with a private defense company in Australia concerning the establishment of a new company.Under the reorganization, Lockheed Martin will retain six business sectors, with three of them reconstituted to incorporate the technical and operational efficiencies of the Lockheed Martin and Loral units.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Baltimore-based Vertis Holdings Inc., at one time the largest U.S. producer of advertising inserts in newspapers, plans to sell itself to a Wisconsin printing company for $258.5 million through an auction in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Vertis filed for Chapter 11 protection in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware Wednesday. It also sought court approval to sell its assets to Quad/Graphics, which produces retail advertising inserts and direct marketing and in-store marketing campaigns. It is the third bankruptcy-law filing in five years for Vertis, which also sought the court's protection to reorganize its finances in 2008 and 2010.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Cosmetics firm Revlon Inc. says it is ending manufacturing operations in Maryland as part of a global reorganization that will eliminate about 250 jobs. The company refused to say Friday where its local facility is located or how many of the layoffs will hit there. The operation is not likely large — the Regional Manufacturing Institute of Maryland hadn't heard of it and state economic development officials could find no record of it. Revlon has not sent state regulators a layoff-warning notice, the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said.
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