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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
Declaring there's "reason to be optimistic" about neighborhood revitalization, Baltimore's top housing official said yesterday that nearly 1,300 new housing units were "moving toward production" and vowed to make the city's discredited Section 8 rental program an asset to communities. Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano told a news conference that financing was in place or being sought for a dozen projects funded in part by the city and containing a total of 1,289 new and renovated mixed-income units, about half of them on the sites of demolished public housing projects Murphy Homes and Flag House Courts.
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
Baltimore City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt said yesterday that she will get out of the landlord business -- just two weeks after a 3-year-old child who lived in one of her rental units was reported suffering from lead poisoning.Though she gave no time when she would divest herself of ownership of her city rental properties, Pratt said that her attorneys are working out the final details."I think because I am a city official, I will have to get out of the real estate business," Pratt said. She added that questions surrounding her rental properties "distract me from doing what the citizens elected me to do."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2000
Another abandoned industrial lot has attracted investors who believe that room with water views and parking spaces are enough to lure residents and businesses to Baltimore's harborfront. A group of investors plans to pitch up to 200 apartments, two parking garages and 150,000 square feet of office space to the city's Design Advisory Panel today. "There's a huge demand for multifamily housing," said developer Larry Silverstein, a principal on the project with CAM Construction Co. Inc. and a family of investors from out of town.
NEWS
February 16, 1996
BALTIMORE CITY's rental apartment market is a paradox. While many neighborhoods are depopulating and have an increasing stock of vacant houses, top-end units around the Inner Harbor are in such short supply Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke wistfully talks about converting aging, hard-to-rent downtown offices into apartments.We have grave doubts about whether such a conversion will make economic sense. Downtown is not the Inner Harbor. A key reason why many of those buildings are underutilized today is their lack of convenient parking.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Eric Siegel contributed to this article | September 5, 1996
Articles in the Sept. 4 and 5 editions reported incorrectly the penalty for failing to register rental properties built before 1950 under Maryland's lead poisoning prevention. The penalty is $10 per day per unit.The Sun regrets the errors.Thousands of people who own older rental homes in Maryland may have failed to register and fix up their properties under the state's new lead-poisoning prevention law, just as City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt did, state officials said yesterday.About 26,000 property owners have registered apartments or homes built before 1978 with the Maryland Department of the Environment, as required by the law.The law, which took effect in February, provides landlords limited protection from tenant lawsuits if they register their properties and make repairs aimed at reducing lead-paint hazards.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
Community leaders and housing experts are skeptical that a bill that would require the licensing of most rental properties in Baltimore County would help root out zoning and safety violations or slow the transformation of older homes from owner-occupied to apartments. The experiences of officials in other cities and counties where rental registration has been in effect for decades suggest that while the bill - introduced before the County Council last week - could strengthen code enforcement efforts in some cases, it could worsen the divide between landlords and the neighborhoods where they own property.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
Community leaders and housing experts are skeptical that a bill that would require the licensing of most rental properties in Baltimore County would help root out zoning and safety violations or slow the transformation of older homes from owner-occupied to apartments. The experiences of officials in other cities and counties where rental registration has been in effect for decades suggest that while the bill - introduced before the County Council last week - could help strengthen code enforcement efforts in some cases, it could also worsen the divide between landlords and the neighborhoods where they own property.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
With a glowing report from code inspectors about their first attempts to systematically catalog and inspect rental properties in Baltimore County, one county councilman said he will propose extending the pilot program to include several Towson-area neighborhoods. Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, a Towson-Perry Hall Democrat, said he would like to see the owners of rental properties in Loch Raven Village, Ridgely Manor and possibly several areas near Towson University be required to register their units with the county and have them inspected.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and JoAnna Daemmrich and Jim Haner and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Higham also contributed to this article | February 3, 1996
Amid expressions of concern by civic leaders yesterday over disclosures that at least five city housing officials own rundown rental houses, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said last night that he plans to order all housing inspectors to fix their properties or sell them.The mayor also said he is considering barring city employees involved in enforcement duties from owning rental properties.Calling recent revelations in The Sun "very disappointing," the mayor said: "They clearly should have felt a duty as housing officials to keep their property in the best of condition.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | April 18, 1993
Have you ever tried to cross a busy Coastal Highway from your bayside condominium with a toddler tucked under one arm and a sand chair, beach bag and beach umbrella under the other?Do you know how heavy a bike can be when you have to haul it up and down flight after flight of stairs to your fourth-floor apartment because the building has no secure ground-level storage space?Would you be disappointed if you had to lean over the balcony railing so you could get a glimpse of the ocean from your so-called "ocean-view" apartment?
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