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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2000
Another abandoned industrial lot has attracted investors who believe that room with water views and parking spaces are enough to lure residents and businesses to Baltimore's harborfront. A group of investors plans to pitch up to 200 apartments, two parking garages and 150,000 square feet of office space to the city's Design Advisory Panel today. "There's a huge demand for multifamily housing," said developer Larry Silverstein, a principal on the project with CAM Construction Co. Inc. and a family of investors from out of town.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
A group of 40 Havre de Grace landlords has formed an organization to share information, raise the quality of rental units and increase the pool of tenants in this historic waterfront city.The Havre de Grace Rental Housing Coalition is spearheaded by Stanley S. Lewis, property manager of Tranquility Townhouses of Concord Fields, a 250-unit rental complex on the west side of the city a few blocks from Tydings Park."Everybody is extremely enthusiastic about our goals," he said."It just makes so much sense to do this.
NEWS
February 16, 1996
BALTIMORE CITY's rental apartment market is a paradox. While many neighborhoods are depopulating and have an increasing stock of vacant houses, top-end units around the Inner Harbor are in such short supply Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke wistfully talks about converting aging, hard-to-rent downtown offices into apartments.We have grave doubts about whether such a conversion will make economic sense. Downtown is not the Inner Harbor. A key reason why many of those buildings are underutilized today is their lack of convenient parking.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Lead poisoning, once widespread, appears on the way to becoming a rarity among children living in old rental housing in Baltimore and the rest of Maryland. But the problem is growing among youngsters who live in owner-occupied and newer rental homes, and that is prompting state officials to look for new ways to fight the longtime health scourge. State environmental officials reported Tuesday that the number of Maryland children found last year with harmful levels of lead in their blood declined to 531, down by 22 from the year before and less than 0.5 percent of all youngsters tested.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
Community leaders and housing experts are skeptical that a bill that would require the licensing of most rental properties in Baltimore County would help root out zoning and safety violations or slow the transformation of older homes from owner-occupied to apartments. The experiences of officials in other cities and counties where rental registration has been in effect for decades suggest that while the bill - introduced before the County Council last week - could strengthen code enforcement efforts in some cases, it could worsen the divide between landlords and the neighborhoods where they own property.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
Community leaders and housing experts are skeptical that a bill that would require the licensing of most rental properties in Baltimore County would help root out zoning and safety violations or slow the transformation of older homes from owner-occupied to apartments. The experiences of officials in other cities and counties where rental registration has been in effect for decades suggest that while the bill - introduced before the County Council last week - could help strengthen code enforcement efforts in some cases, it could also worsen the divide between landlords and the neighborhoods where they own property.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Eric Siegel contributed to this article | September 5, 1996
Articles in the Sept. 4 and 5 editions reported incorrectly the penalty for failing to register rental properties built before 1950 under Maryland's lead poisoning prevention. The penalty is $10 per day per unit.The Sun regrets the errors.Thousands of people who own older rental homes in Maryland may have failed to register and fix up their properties under the state's new lead-poisoning prevention law, just as City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt did, state officials said yesterday.About 26,000 property owners have registered apartments or homes built before 1978 with the Maryland Department of the Environment, as required by the law.The law, which took effect in February, provides landlords limited protection from tenant lawsuits if they register their properties and make repairs aimed at reducing lead-paint hazards.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and JoAnna Daemmrich and Jim Haner and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Higham also contributed to this article | February 3, 1996
Amid expressions of concern by civic leaders yesterday over disclosures that at least five city housing officials own rundown rental houses, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said last night that he plans to order all housing inspectors to fix their properties or sell them.The mayor also said he is considering barring city employees involved in enforcement duties from owning rental properties.Calling recent revelations in The Sun "very disappointing," the mayor said: "They clearly should have felt a duty as housing officials to keep their property in the best of condition.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | April 18, 1993
Have you ever tried to cross a busy Coastal Highway from your bayside condominium with a toddler tucked under one arm and a sand chair, beach bag and beach umbrella under the other?Do you know how heavy a bike can be when you have to haul it up and down flight after flight of stairs to your fourth-floor apartment because the building has no secure ground-level storage space?Would you be disappointed if you had to lean over the balcony railing so you could get a glimpse of the ocean from your so-called "ocean-view" apartment?
NEWS
By Linda Geeson and Linda Geeson,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 12, 1991
"Where were you in December? That's what I'd like to know," says Jerry Selig, owner of Cleaning Management Services. He's talking to all those hotel and motel managers and condo owners who now are rushing to get their units cleaned and refurbished in time for the summer rental season. Mr. Selig's company does carpet cleaning and dyeing as well as restoration and renovation work, and the preseason push has his staff of 14 working long hours six days a week."People put it off all winter," he says of the touch-ups and scrub-downs required to put Ocean City's 23,220 rental units in shape for the summer season.
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