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NEWS
By Kathryn Miller Goldman | February 8, 1993
IT IS no surprise to the homeless man at the intersection of Loch Raven and Taylor avenues begging food for work. It is no surprise to the mother and her two children living in the emergency shelter downtown.We have a housing crisis.The problem is not just in the city; it's in the affluent suburbs and the rural communities of the Eastern Shore. The problem is not just in public housing. It's not just the vacant high-rise apartments at Lexington Terrace, not only the 26,000 families on the housing authority's waiting list.
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NEWS
By Mike Schaefer | November 15, 2009
Each day, the District Court at 700 E. Patapsco St. has a roomful of parking ticket culprits who feel they are not guilty, or cannot afford the fines and penalties, or are gambling on the officer not showing up (so they win by default). About a dozen enforcement officers spend one to two hours to see that justice is done. The judge (with a $127,252 salary) is supported by two clerks and two bailiffs (the latter costing $35,000 a year each). Some judges are in good moods, some not; this is generally the least-desired of judicial assignments.
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NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 25, 2007
There were husbands sent to prison, sudden ailments and lost jobs. Roommates who vanished, promises that were broken. Spend a day in rent court, where landlords go to evict tenants, and the miseries pile up like missed payments and late fees. Spend a day in rent court and you realize how close to the edge some people live, a lost paycheck, a bad decision or a string of misfortune away from their stuff being dumped on the sidewalk and nowhere to live. Unless, that is, they have a relative or friend to take them in. If you wondered, as I did, how at least 13 people ended up living in the two-story Cecil Avenue rowhouse that burned Tuesday, killing six of them, you could find some answers in rent court.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 25, 2007
There were husbands sent to prison, sudden ailments and lost jobs. Roommates who vanished, promises that were broken. Spend a day in rent court, where landlords go to evict tenants, and the miseries pile up like missed payments and late fees. Spend a day in rent court and you realize how close to the edge some people live, a lost paycheck, a bad decision or a string of misfortune away from their stuff being dumped on the sidewalk and nowhere to live. Unless, that is, they have a relative or friend to take them in. If you wondered, as I did, how at least 13 people ended up living in the two-story Cecil Avenue rowhouse that burned Tuesday, killing six of them, you could find some answers in rent court.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | February 20, 1992
I spent a few hours this week watching Judge Robert Gerstung preside over the city's Rent Court and, frankly, he didn't seem so horrible.Once, he snapped at a woman who had interrupted him."That's what I've been saying," said the woman."No, it isn't," said Gerstung, pointing his finger at her and raising his voice. "That's not what you've been saying. You keep saying, 'That's what I'm saying' right after I say it, and it's not what you've been saying at all."Another time, Gerstung seemed exasperated with a tenant who expressed surprise that she owed more than $1,000 in back rent.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | November 26, 1991
A few hundred tenants pack into Essex rent court and spill into the hallway, hoping to stave off eviction for one more month.They come with infants and toddlers, empty pockets and sad stories of lost jobs.Richard Schofield has just been laid off as manager of Tony's Pizza.He's come with his wife, Dawn, and one of their three children.Hugh Painter Jr. has been out of work as a laborer for a year.His unemployment benefits ran out this summer.Susan Kay Fritze, who seems especially worried in a room full of worried people, lost her job a year ago when Levenson and Klein closed.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
The case of Henry John "Jack" Reed III vs. Goldie Sanders is on the docket this morning in city Rent Court on North Avenue. It pits a senior housing inspector against a 33-year-old mother of two who is renting a crumbling rowhouse from him in East Baltimore.Mr. Reed wants to evict his tenant. But actually on trial are the policies of the city's Department of Housing and Community Development and a housing code that is supposed to protect renters.LTC Mr. Reed, 55, a superintendent of housing inspection for almost three decades, was allowed to amass a portfolio of 13 troubled rental properties on the city's east side with the knowledge of his immediate superiors.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
"Judgment for landlord. Next case.""Judgment for landlord. Next case.""Judgment for landlord. Next case."The sound you hear is Baltimore tenants -- usually poor, black women -- being shoved ever closer to eviction. It is uttered in Rent Court with numbing regularity by a Baltimore judge every workday of every week. Scores of times. Hundreds on busy days."Judgment for landlord. Next case."In the end, the vast majority of tenants who appear in Rent Court are able to stave off eviction, but first, tens of thousands of them, year after year, must endure this warning: Pay up or expect to hit the road.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1991
Gilbert and Catherine Miller are nomads of the times.Too poor to pay the rent after Gilbert lost his job two years ago, they moved with their 15-year-old son from a home in Middle River to another in Highlandtown, to friends in White Marsh and ** to his parents in White Hall.And then, for two months last summer, they lived out of the back of their pickup truck."It was like a nightmare," said Catherine, recalling the summer.After that, they lived with her mother in Reisterstown before moving to a homeless shelter in Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By George B. Laurent | January 16, 1994
Poor maintenance is probably the major problem for tenants. Almost as bad is the way tenants are often treated when they complain about needed repairs -- with indifference approaching hostility.Therefore, many tenants feel that they have the right to withhold rent -- to put it in escrow -- by keeping it or putting it in their own bank account until the repairs are made. That is not the legal way to establish rent escrow.Rent escrow, a procedure established by a judge, involves paying rent to the court until repairs are made.
NEWS
By JENNIFER GROW | February 28, 2001
I HAD A conversation once with a woman from a nearby neighborhood association who dismissed my opinion of my neighborhood when she learned that I was a renter and didn't actually own my home. She was intolerant of renters because she was more interested in raising property values on her block. I have a friend nearby -- he owns his home -- who believes that some in his neighborhood association have unrealistic expectations for their neighborhood and are therefore unsympathetic to renters.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
A court will open next month to hear cases of illegal gun possession, which Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy hopes will mean tougher punishment for gun-toting criminals. Jessamy said yesterday that the so-called "gun court" will operate one day a week in the city's two District Courthouses on North and Wabash avenues. The court is expected to begin May 2. "I hope that we get better sentences in gun cases," Jessamy said yesterday. In the past, "sometimes things fell through the cracks.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1996
Baltimore real estate officials say Morris A. Iles owes the city $270,206 for 14 years of back rent and taxes. Iles counters by saying they're wrong.In a court battle symbolic of the problems surrounding management of the city's $3.2 billion real estate portfolio, no one seems to know who is right.Even though the real estate department filed suit against Iles for back rent, another city agency, the law department, had a judge dismiss the case in rent court Tuesday, apparently wiping the rent slate clean for Iles.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mike Preston contributed to this article | March 1, 1996
Despite lawsuits, ultimatums from politicians and threats of eviction, Baltimore Stallions owner Jim Speros refused yesterday to move his team out of Memorial Stadium and asked state officials for more than $1 million he claims belongs to him.Constables taped a "failure to pay rent" notice on Mr. Speros' corporate office door at the stadium yesterday, and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke offered to drop several lawsuits the city has pending against the...
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Eager to give Baltimore's new football franchise a home of its own, city officials are telling Stallions owner Jim Speros to get out of Memorial Stadium before they throw his team's belongings in the street.Miffed by his failure to move his property out of the stadium's corporate offices, city attorneys took the first step Tuesday in evicting Mr. Speros, filing suit for $73,000 he owes in back rent and ordering him to attend a hearing next week in rent court.While city officials want the rent -- Mr. Speros is also the target of two other city lawsuits seeking a total of $575,000 -- the office space is of primary concern since Art Modell and his NFL team are clamoring to get up and running.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1996
Standing red-faced before a judge in Rent Court yesterday, a senior city housing inspector gave up almost $3,000 in back rent he said he was owed by an East Baltimore tenant after being confronted with evidence that he allowed his property to deteriorate for years."
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
Fed up with unsafe and unhealthy living conditions, 67 residents of Lexington Terrace placed their February rents in escrow accounts yesterday, holding back $6,800 from their landlord -- the Housing Authority of Baltimore City.About 370 Lexington Terrace residents, who pay rents that range from $36 to $500 a month, did not participate in the strike.By their action, the strikers hope to prod management to make long-needed repairs or relocate them from the complex's five high-rises into generally safer low-rise public housing units, said Marla Hollandsworth, a University of Baltimore law professor who directs a group of UB law students who are representing the tenants.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
A court will open next month to hear cases of illegal gun possession, which Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy hopes will mean tougher punishment for gun-toting criminals. Jessamy said yesterday that the so-called "gun court" will operate one day a week in the city's two District Courthouses on North and Wabash avenues. The court is expected to begin May 2. "I hope that we get better sentences in gun cases," Jessamy said yesterday. In the past, "sometimes things fell through the cracks.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
The case of Henry John "Jack" Reed III vs. Goldie Sanders is on the docket this morning in city Rent Court on North Avenue. It pits a senior housing inspector against a 33-year-old mother of two who is renting a crumbling rowhouse from him in East Baltimore.Mr. Reed wants to evict his tenant. But actually on trial are the policies of the city's Department of Housing and Community Development and a housing code that is supposed to protect renters.LTC Mr. Reed, 55, a superintendent of housing inspection for almost three decades, was allowed to amass a portfolio of 13 troubled rental properties on the city's east side with the knowledge of his immediate superiors.
BUSINESS
By George B. Laurent | January 16, 1994
Poor maintenance is probably the major problem for tenants. Almost as bad is the way tenants are often treated when they complain about needed repairs -- with indifference approaching hostility.Therefore, many tenants feel that they have the right to withhold rent -- to put it in escrow -- by keeping it or putting it in their own bank account until the repairs are made. That is not the legal way to establish rent escrow.Rent escrow, a procedure established by a judge, involves paying rent to the court until repairs are made.
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