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By Leslie Cauley | March 14, 1991
For anyone who's lived the nightmare of standing in line for hours at the Motor Vehicle Administration just to renew a car registration, Planning Research Corp. has what you want: a renewal-by-phone system.PRC, a division of Baltimore-based Black & Decker Corp., has developed a system that allows people to instantly renew vehicle registrations by phone. Using a touch-tone phone and a credit card, users can dial a toll-free number 24 hours a day to renew registrations.Once connected to the system, an automated voice greets callers and walks them through the registration process.
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BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
When developing countries need to deepen a canal for irrigation or navigation, they frequently call on Ellicott Dredges, a 129-year-old Baltimore-based maker of dredging equipment. To sell their massive, multimillion-dollar machines abroad, Ellicott Dredges often turns to the U.S. Export-Import Bank — an obscure federal agency that facilitated more than $37 billion in exports last year. The 80-year-old bank, a New Deal-era institution that provides loans and credit guarantees, is now at the center of a debate between conservative Republicans and the rest of Congress.
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NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 1999
COUPLES WILL renew their marriage vows in a Valentine's Day service Sunday at Bethany United Methodist Church in Ellicott City.Senior Pastor Rod Miller planned the celebration when he realized that Valentine's Day fell on a Sunday this year.He had attended a workshop on marriage last summer that stressed the role of the church in helping people keep their marriage vows.In the past, one or two couples a year renewed their vows during the year, and the church sponsored dances on Valentine's Day.But in this year's event, parishioners and other community members are invited to participate in "renewing, reaffirming, remembering, celebrating and giving thanks" for their marriage covenant.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Maryland religious leaders issued a call for families to offer foster care to immigrant children from Central America as part of an effort to see that unaccompanied minors find shelter in homes rather than in barracks. Faith leaders who met with Gov. Martin O'Malley at the State House on Monday said as many as 2,000 children are expected to join more than 2,200 who have already found homes in Maryland, often with relatives, since the beginning of the year. Maryland has already taken in more of the immigrant children than all but a handful of large states.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 22, 1993
Barry Levinson's campaign to keep "Homicide" alive got a boost in the form of an endorsement from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.Benjamin L. Hooks, outgoing executive director of the NAACP, sent a letter last week to NBC President Warren Littlefield praising the series for its "compelling rendering of today's multi-racial and multi-cultural urban society" and urging the network to renew "Homicide" for next season."With so few quality programs being aired on the television networks," Hooks wrote, "we are dismayed to learn that 'Homicide,' which we regard as a truly outstanding series, is going on hiatus and there is some doubt about whether it will return."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
Full of excitement, 6-year-old Danielle Wiseman scooted up and down the pew on Sunday, witnessing something not every child gets to see.Her mom and dad got married."
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | September 9, 1996
THE FOCUS ON President Clinton's colorful train ride and the Democratic convention eclipsed, for most people, his latest proposal to deal with the nation's 400,000 to 600,000 lightly polluted ''brownfield'' sites -- areas below the serious contamination level of Superfund locations.Before a trainside crowd in Kalamazoo, Michigan, Mr. Clinton laid out a new four-year, $300 million program to help states and cities identify brownfield sites, develop plans to clean them up, get businesses involved and set up revolving loan funds to cover costs.
NEWS
November 12, 2006
Louis A. Renew, a beverage company sales and quality control manager, died of a heart attack Thursday at his company's office in Northeast. He was 61 and lived in Glen Arm. Mr. Renew was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated in 1964 from City College. He was an Army intelligence specialist and served in Vietnam from 1966 to 1969, and attended what is now Towson University for several years after being honorably discharged from the service. From 1971 to 1975, he was an account manager for the Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. in Baltimore until becoming manager of the G. Heileman Brewing Co. brewery in Lansdowne.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1998
The city's liquor board decided after a four-hour hearing yesterday to renew the liquor license of Pimlico Discount Liquors at 5142 Pimlico Road despite the owner's guilty pleas this year to charges of possession of drug paraphernalia and selling alcohol to minors.Phillip Minn, who has owned the store since 1989, was fined $500 for possessing drug paraphernalia this year.Stephen George, a Park Heights resident, protested against renewal of the store's license, but he was outnumbered at the hearing by two dozen residents supporting Minn.
NEWS
By VICKI WELLFORD | June 7, 1994
St. Joseph's Church of Odenton will join other churches in the Archdiocese of Baltimore in RENEW, an international spiritual program.This 2 1/2 -year program will give Christians of all denominations an opportunity to evaluate the spiritual aspects of their lives and become more aware of their gifts and talents, said the Rev. John Harrison.Participants in RENEW will take part in five six-week sessions in the fall and during Lent, with each session having a comprehensive theme.Leaders of RENEW hope to foster a vibrant spiritual community and become more involved in social action.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
Comedy Central today renewed "Drunk History" for a third season. The series, which features drunken performers recounting stories from our national past, is created by Lutherville native Derek Waters. This past week's epsiode featured three tales from Baltimore's past. Through the first four epsiodes of Season 2, the series' viewership is up 26 percent among adults 18-49. It's up 17 percent among all viewers. In its timeslot, Tuesdays at 10 p.m., it is the highest-rated original series in TV with men 18-34 years of age. Last season, "Drunk History" averaged one million viewers a week.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
It's a pretty safe bet that the year and month a vehicle registration is due for renewal is unknown to the average car owner living in Maryland or anywhere else for that matter. Most of us probably can't recall our tag number (even though it's a useful bit of information when registering at a hotel) let alone when it's time to get new stickers. So it's understandable that the latest misstep by the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration - a delay in sending out registration renewal notices by mail - caught some drivers off-guard.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
When Jim Maguire returned to his Pikesville home recently after a week out of town, he found a reminder from the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration to renew the registration on his car waiting in the pile of mail. "I was just going to set it aside and look at it in another month," the longtime Marylander said. "I just assumed it didn't apply to me immediately. " Luckily he didn't, because it did. Maguire, 53, was one of thousands of Marylanders who were sent notices to renew their vehicle registrations days before their tags were due to expire.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
The Baltimore County Board of Education needs to restore sibling priority for kindergarten admission to magnet elementary schools. While the intentions of revoking sibling priority may have been good, the impact on Baltimore County families and on the school system itself will be overwhelmingly negative. The previous Baltimore County Public Schools superintendent revoked sibling priority for kindergarten applications to elementary magnet schools in order to make access to magnet schools more equitable for all families.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
On one side are technologists, preaching that open access to unlimited Internet bandwidth is the bedrock of innovation for a 21st-century economy - and is under threat. On the other are telecommunications giants that say they are equally committed to an unrestricted Internet but face the challenge of squeezing more and more streamed movies and cable show binges through networks they constantly must beef up. In the middle, regulators are refereeing a debate that could come to yet another tipping point this month.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A plan aimed at fixing a large number of failing household septic systems on Kent Island is stirring debate, as Queen Anne's County looks to permit roughly 600 new homes on the low-lying gateway to the Eastern Shore while hooking existing homes up to its sewer system. County officials say the $53 million state-financed sewer project, made possible by legislation passed this year, would resolve a long-standing public health and environmental problem while limiting how much new development can take place in an area virtually surrounded by the Chesapeake Bay. But opponents say the project flies in the face of Maryland's Smart Growth policies and rewards real estate speculators who've been sitting on unbuildable housing lots there for years.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Michael A. Fletcher and Mark Bomster and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke today said he has asked the school board not to renew the contract of embattled city school Superintendent Richard C. Hunter."For me, what's at issue is not just where the school system is now, but the direction it will be taking in the future," Schmoke said today during a news conference."
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
Two years ago, Richard Daniels, a 60-year-old engineer, was ready to leave St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church in Columbia, a parish of more than 2,700 families."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Christoph Eschenbach has extended his contract as National Symphony Orchestra music director for two years, which keeps him on the podium through 2016-2017. That will be his seventh season.  This is his second contract extension since his tenure started in 2010. "I am very happy that management and the board agreed in a rather enthusiastic way to the extension, and same with the orchestra," Eschenbach said in a phone interview. "We are sailing the same ship, so to say, and that ship is called quality, great music-making and a passion for what we do. The orchestra has come to the point where every note they play and prepare -- and, by the way, they are always wondefully prepared -- is played for their lives and and the lives of the audience.
NEWS
By Cheryl Casciani | March 14, 2014
So, how about this weather? This question is often just small talk, but conversation about the recent weather has not been simple idle chatter. While Baltimore was bundled up against the frigid "polar vortex," Alaska saw record high temperatures. While Atlanta was virtually shut down in an unusual winter storm, California experienced a severe drought. Scientists predict climate change will mean more extreme weather - longer droughts, bigger storms and more extreme hot and cold temperatures.
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