Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRendell
IN THE NEWS

Rendell

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | March 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Philadelphia's Mayor Edward Rendell, taking office in the early '90s, was a kind of folk hero to believers in America's cities.Quickly, he moved to shore up finances and save America's founding city from bankruptcy. He scrubbed City Hall (literally down on his knees cleaning one washroom). He brought energy and "reinvented" government to a demoralized bureaucracy. He fought hard to retain private sector jobs and find new ones. People nodded approvingly when Vice President Gore dubbed Ed Rendell "America's Mayor."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Infrastructure could be the least sexy word in the English language, former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell acknowledged to his audience Monday morning, but "it is essential to everything we do. " While roads, rails and the electric grid — just to name a few — made the United States the greatest economic power in the world, those systems are no longer robust, Rendell said. Paltry amounts of money have been targeted for improvements to shipping channels and rail lines. Massive water main breaks have become a common occurrence as maintenance backlogs grow.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | July 31, 2008
Two of Hillary Clinton's strongest Mid-Atlantic region supporters joined forces last night to rally Maryland Democratic activists for Barack Obama. The effort will probably result in Maryland volunteers heading to neighboring states. Pennsylvania Gov. Edward G. Rendell and Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley said they are committed to Obama's election despite their early support for Clinton. The two governors, along with Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin and the six Democratic members of the state congressional delegation, appeared at a $1,000-a-person fundraiser at the Iguana Cantina in Baltimore that raised $100,000 for the state Democratic Party's election-year efforts for president and Congress.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | July 31, 2008
Two of Hillary Clinton's strongest Mid-Atlantic region supporters joined forces last night to rally Maryland Democratic activists for Barack Obama. The effort will probably result in Maryland volunteers heading to neighboring states. Pennsylvania Gov. Edward G. Rendell and Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley said they are committed to Obama's election despite their early support for Clinton. The two governors, along with Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin and the six Democratic members of the state congressional delegation, appeared at a $1,000-a-person fundraiser at the Iguana Cantina in Baltimore that raised $100,000 for the state Democratic Party's election-year efforts for president and Congress.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2002
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Mike Fisher arrived at the Rotary Club luncheon here the other day to find he was only the second of two speakers on the program. So he sat by for 15 or 20 minutes while a "golf property analyst" made a sales pitch for a new course. Fisher is the state attorney general and Republican candidate for governor. But in the priorities of these Rotarians, he was chopped liver. He took it all with equanimity, remarking as he drove away only that he thought it was "a little strange" to have two speakers.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 5, 2005
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Normally, I don't care much for politicians who inject themselves into sports any more than I like athletes or actors lecturing me on politics, but I'm making an exception for Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell. The affable former Philadelphia mayor is a diehard Eagles fan and a true-blue Democrat, and I still can't help but like him, though I have to take issue with his prediction that Donovan McNabb and Co. will squeak out a victory tomorrow in the Super Bowl. Hey, he picked Smarty Jones to win the Belmont and he picked John Kerry to win the presidency, so if he says that the Eagles will win a 24-21 squeaker and finally ease the pain of their long-suffering fans, I say bet the Liberty Bell on the Patriots.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Peter Schmuck and Jim Henneman and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writers | October 20, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Ed Rendell, the mayor of Philadelphia, didn't show much respect for Todd Stottlemyre, who will pitch Game 4 of the World Series for the Toronto Blue Jays here tonight.During a visit to Toronto, Rendell was critical of the Blue Jays' pitching staff, particularly Stottlemyre. "I could envision them [the Phillies] getting swept by a combination of the White Sox's pitching and the Blue Jays' hitting," said Rendell."But not this pitching staff. If Frank Thomas could hit a ball 430 feet off Stottlemyre, I could hit one 270. I'd like to bat against him."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2002
ALLENTOWN, Pa. - The road map says it is 126 miles from Philadelphia to Scranton. But in terms of the culture of the Democratic Party, the distance may be immeasurable. The gulf between the socially conservative old-line regulars and the activist liberals is being demonstrated these days in the race for the Democratic nomination for governor that will be decided in a May 21 primary. On the one hand is state Auditor General Robert P. Casey Jr. of the Scranton Caseys, son of the former governor who captured attention a decade ago by trying to move the Democratic Party to oppose abortion rights but failed to win even a speaking slot at the national convention.
NEWS
March 24, 1995
Thomas G. Davis, 67, formerly a top executive of SmithKline Beckman Corp., died Saturday of leukemia in Radnor, Pa. As vice president and medical director from 1977 to 1989, he saw the drug company's anti-ulcer medication Tagamet become thefirst drug with more than $1 billion in annual sales.Emma Sloat Rendell, 86, mother of Philadelphia Mayor Edward G. Rendell, died Tuesday of a lung infection. She taughtelementary school and later designed clothing.The Rev. WIlliam Francis Hogan, 64, procurator general of the Congregation of Holy Cross, a religious order, died March 15 at a hospital in Rome.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,Sun Staff | January 11, 1998
"A Prayer for The City: The True Story of a Mayor and Five Heroes in a Race Against Time," by Buzz Bissinger. 402 pages. $24.95.The Philadelphia that Mayor Edward G. Rendell inherits in January 1992 is coming apart at the seams. Actually, there are no seams, only great gushing wounds. Mortal wounds, it is feared.The city has just enough money left in its piggybank to pay the bills for about a week and a half, and the budget deficit is headed toward an astounding $1.246 billion in five years if nothing is done.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2006
Bringing a fledgling privatization trend from the Midwest to Maryland's doorstep, Pennsylvania Gov. Edward G. Rendell is seeking offers for the sale or long-term lease of the Pennsylvania Turnpike - a nearly 70-year-old icon of innovative American engineering. Rendell's objective is to raise billions of dollars for Pennsylvania transportation projects that otherwise might require increased taxes. His model: Indiana, where an Australian-Spanish conglomerate owns a toll road. The turnpike was the first major U.S. toll road of the automobile era and a prototype for the Interstate Highway System.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 20, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- And now for the definition-impaired, the meaning of the word naive: "deficient in worldly wisdom or informed judgment." There was plenty of that on display last week in Pittsburgh and Washington. At the annual National Conference of Editorial Writers Convention in Pittsburgh, Edward G. Rendell, Pennsylvania governor and former general chairman of the Democratic National Committee, addressed a group of pundits on the subject, "Will the Real Democratic Party Please Stand Up?"
SPORTS
October 16, 2005
THEY SAID IT "I'm still going to be playing hard, out of control, just wild like an animal. I need to be caged in and I will let the referees handle it." Ron Artest Indiana Pacers forward (above), on whether he plans on changing his game "I'm a broadcaster who wants to be governor, not a governor who wants to be a broadcaster." Lynn Swann ABC sideline reporter and former NFL star, who might challenge Ed Rendell as a gubernatorial candidate in Pennsylvania Good morning --Trent Dilfer--We'll completely understand it if you come in today screaming like a banshee.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 5, 2005
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Normally, I don't care much for politicians who inject themselves into sports any more than I like athletes or actors lecturing me on politics, but I'm making an exception for Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell. The affable former Philadelphia mayor is a diehard Eagles fan and a true-blue Democrat, and I still can't help but like him, though I have to take issue with his prediction that Donovan McNabb and Co. will squeak out a victory tomorrow in the Super Bowl. Hey, he picked Smarty Jones to win the Belmont and he picked John Kerry to win the presidency, so if he says that the Eagles will win a 24-21 squeaker and finally ease the pain of their long-suffering fans, I say bet the Liberty Bell on the Patriots.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 20, 2005
ED RENDELL, the governor of Pennsylvania, is a serious pro football fan - serious enough to take part in a weekly roundtable discussion that airs on a Philadelphia cable TV station after Eagles games. With both of his state's teams hosting playoff games last weekend, Rendell lived out a fan's dream and attended both. On Saturday, he watched the Pittsburgh Steelers barely survive the New York Jets in overtime. On Sunday, he watched the Eagles - his beloved hometown team - knock out the Minnesota Vikings.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 12, 2004
YOU CAN tell who's losing the Pennsylvania-Delaware-New Jersey jobs war: the one yelling loudest for a truce. "One of the biggest problems we have is that we have competed against each other for jobs," Pennsylvania Gov. Edward G. Rendell told his neighboring governors at an extraordinary, tri-state economic summit a few days ago, according to news accounts. Rendell, nudged by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, wants the three states to formally agree not to raid one another for companies by waving tax discounts and other bribes.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | August 31, 1992
Washington -- Public worker strikes in big American cities are no joke. With sanitation crews off the job, huge mounds of garbage bags accumulate along the sidewalks. Critical street repairs grind to a halt. Housing services break down. Tax collections and safety inspections stall.But Philadelphia seems poised to bear a strike this fall by two blue- and white-collar public worker unions representing its 16,000 non-uniformed employees.Bargaining is still under way between the unions and the administration of Edward Rendell, the ex-district attorney elected mayor last fall on a platform of Spartan, efficient government to rescue a city teetering on the edge of bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2006
Bringing a fledgling privatization trend from the Midwest to Maryland's doorstep, Pennsylvania Gov. Edward G. Rendell is seeking offers for the sale or long-term lease of the Pennsylvania Turnpike - a nearly 70-year-old icon of innovative American engineering. Rendell's objective is to raise billions of dollars for Pennsylvania transportation projects that otherwise might require increased taxes. His model: Indiana, where an Australian-Spanish conglomerate owns a toll road. The turnpike was the first major U.S. toll road of the automobile era and a prototype for the Interstate Highway System.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2004
The Rottweiler By Ruth Rendell. Crown publishing. 336 pages. $25. Ask any crime fiction aficionado for a list of the genre's best writers and chances are high that Ruth Rendell's name will appear near the top. The London-based psychological suspense author has been writing steadily for 40 years, beginning with 1964's A Doon with Death. The number of awards to her name would fill an entire living room and a large part of the next room over. I'd go on, but you get my drift: Rendell's considered to be one of the genre's greats, someone whose influence will be felt many years after her passing.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2002
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Mike Fisher arrived at the Rotary Club luncheon here the other day to find he was only the second of two speakers on the program. So he sat by for 15 or 20 minutes while a "golf property analyst" made a sales pitch for a new course. Fisher is the state attorney general and Republican candidate for governor. But in the priorities of these Rotarians, he was chopped liver. He took it all with equanimity, remarking as he drove away only that he thought it was "a little strange" to have two speakers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.